Results

Enrollment and waitlist data for current and upcoming courses refresh every 10 minutes; all other information as of 6:00 AM.


Refine Search Results

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

101-D01
The Search for Happiness
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
E. Kidd
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 40761
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
55S 207

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 40761

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

  Erika Kidd

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

4 Credits

101-D02
The Search for Happiness
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Kidd
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/17/0
Lecture
CRN 40829
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 40829

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

  Erika Kidd

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

4 Credits

101-D03
The Search for Happiness
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
A. Litke
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/7/0
Lecture
CRN 41390
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41390

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

  Austin Dominic Litke

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

4 Credits

205-01
Crisis and Development
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
R. Kennedy
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/17/0
Lecture
CRN 41931
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 204

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 204

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41931

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

4 Credits

205-02
Crisis and Development
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Kennedy
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/15/0
Lecture
CRN 41091
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41091

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

4 Credits

222-L01
Catholic Literary Tradition
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
10/8/0
Lecture
CRN 42380
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 209

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 209

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 42380

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

What makes a text a work of Catholic literature? How do Catholic writers struggle with the existential questions of meaning, purpose, or suffering in a unique fashion? How do the themes they engage—such as forgiveness, redemption, or the power of grace in the world—place them within the Catholic tradition? Is there a sacramental imagination or incarnational theology at the root of a work of Catholic literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Catholic literature in both English and translation from the medieval era through the present. This course satisfies an Integration in the Humanities requirement and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement; it also satisfies a Traditions 200-level course requirement for Catholic Studies majors and a Historical Perspectives requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. NOTE: This is a cross-listed class with English, with 10 seats available on the CATH 222 side and 10 seats available on the ENGL 222 side.

4 Credits

295-01
Life of Christ in the Arts
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
K. Wehr
 
09/04 - 10/23
25/12/0
Lecture
CRN 42881
2 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 10/23
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 42881

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Kathryn Wehr

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

2 Credits

301-01
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 40686
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 203

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 203

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 203

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 40686

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

301-02
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/5/1
Lecture
CRN 41435
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 203

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 203

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 203

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41435

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

301-03
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 41933
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 203

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 203

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 203

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41933

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

301-04
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/5/0
Lecture
CRN 41934
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 203

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 203

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 203

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41934

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

CSMA: Catholic Studies (Grad)

500-1
Cath Thought & Culture I
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
J. Boyle
 
09/04 - 12/20
15/17/0
Lecture
CRN 41452
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

         

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 41452

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  John Boyle

This interdisciplinary course begins exploration of the relations between [Catholic Christian] faith and culture exhibited through works of imagination and intellect drawn from the New Testament through medieval periods. As part of the M.A. program core curriculum, the course focuses on the multifaceted Catholic tradition but includes perspectives from Christians of other denominations and non-Christians selected to show the dialogue between Catholic thought and other cultural views and accomplishments. Primary attention will be given to works of literature, music, and art, with some attention to philosophical and theological works selected especially for their contributions to articulating insights concerning the relationship between faith and culture.

3 Credits

500-2
Cath Thought & Culture I
 
TBD
J. Boyle
 
09/04 - 12/20
15/11/0
Lecture
CRN 42441
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 42441

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  John Boyle

This interdisciplinary course begins exploration of the relations between [Catholic Christian] faith and culture exhibited through works of imagination and intellect drawn from the New Testament through medieval periods. As part of the M.A. program core curriculum, the course focuses on the multifaceted Catholic tradition but includes perspectives from Christians of other denominations and non-Christians selected to show the dialogue between Catholic thought and other cultural views and accomplishments. Primary attention will be given to works of literature, music, and art, with some attention to philosophical and theological works selected especially for their contributions to articulating insights concerning the relationship between faith and culture.

3 Credits

521-1
Augustine's Confessions
 
W 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
E. Kidd
 
09/04 - 12/20
15/17/2
Lecture
CRN 42935
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 2
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
8:00 pm
55S 207

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 42935

CoFlex:In Person&Online Sync | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Erika Kidd

St. Augustine’s Confessions is one of the most enduring and influential works of Christian literature, one that speaks about the relation between God and man in an unprecedented way. Augustine makes his confession to God by telling the story of his life, and he casts the mysteries of theology in terms of his own experience. As we explore the philosophical, theological, and literary dimensions of this remarkable work, we will consider the particulars of Augustine’s story and the way those particulars set the stage for Augustine’s reflection on creatures and their Creator, memory and time, and sin and grace.

3 Credits

536-1
Story of Catholic Education
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
M. Naughton
 
09/04 - 12/20
15/19/1
Lecture
CRN 42426
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

           

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 42426

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Michael Naughton

The heart of any culture, as well as its continuity, can be found in its educational tradition, the distillation for the next generation of its highest ideals and most important truths. For the West this began with the Greeks, who set in place, some five centuries before Christ, the main aspects of a tradition that lasted, with significant developments, up until very recent times. This course will trace that tradition, using both primary and secondary source material, and will include: its origins in fifth-century BC Greece; its universalization during the Hellenistic period; its encounter with Christianity in the Patristic era; its Christian instantiation under the Carolingian Empire; the great Medieval educational synthesis and the rise of the University; the development of Renaissance humanism and the Ratio Studiorum of the Jesuits; Newman’s classic expression of the tradition in The Idea of a University; and the great challenge to that tradition and change that has taken place during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

3 Credits

539-1
Early Christians in the Church
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
A. Litke
 
09/04 - 12/20
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 42439
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 42439

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Austin Dominic Litke

“What has Athens to do with Jerusalem?” The third-century Christian writer Tertullian asked this in a sort of exasperation as he saw the root of all erroneous doctrine lying in the over-reliance of Christians on pagan doctrines. How is a Christian supposed to approach classical Greek and Roman culture? How did the Church react to the various movements of pagan thought which she encountered in the earliest centuries of the Church? This course will take up these questions in a largely chronological manner, beginning with the Apologists of the second century and ending with the Christian response to the Greek Renaissance in Byzantium of the sixth and seventh centuries, to gain a sense of how the Church, ever a good steward, is able to bring out both “the new and the old” in allowing the Incarnation not to abolish the good things of the ancient world but transform it into something new.

3 Credits

544-1
Nature & Grace in Shakespeare
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
B. Junker
 
09/04 - 12/20
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 42430
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
OEC 208

           

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 42430

CoFlex:In Person&Online Sync | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 208

  Billy Junker

This course examines the relationship between the natural and supernatural orders as imagined in the drama of Shakespeare. Some questions we will ask include: What is the relationship between good (and bad) human acts and the broader order of creation? What effect, if any, does the supernatural gift of grace play in transforming human action? How does such grace find representation within Shakespeare's plays? Does Shakespeare offer a consistent picture of how God relates to the world of nature and human action? We will pursue these questions through a close reading of a number of Shakespeare's plays.

3 Credits

DVDT: Dogmatic Theology (Div.)

501-01
Fundamental Theology
 
TF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
B. Stevenson
 
09/05 - 12/20
25/10/0
Lecture
CRN 40395
3 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
In Person

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
In Person

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 40395

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Bill Stevenson

This course examines the principles and foundations of Catholic theology regarding its nature and method, the relationship between philosophy and theology, theology as the science of ecclesial faith, and its sources in Sacred Scripture, Tradition, and the Magisterium of the Church.

3 Credits

502-01
Ecclesiology
 
MR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
B. Wanless
 
09/05 - 12/20
21/19/0
Lecture
CRN 40396
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 105

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 105

     

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 40396

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Brandon Wanless

This course explores the origin, nature, and mission of the Church in Scripture and Tradition, especially the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, Lumen Gentium. The course addresses the Church as sacrament and mystery, the marks of the Church and ecumenism, the concept and meaning of the People of God, and the relationship between the laity and the ordained ministry. The course includes a special focus on the Blessed Virgin Mary as a type of the Church. Prerequisite: DVDT 501 or permission of instructor.

3 Credits

503-01
Theological Anthropology
 
T 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
A. Hippler
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 42966
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 105

         

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 42966

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Arthur Hippler

This course examines the principles that inform a Catholic understanding of the human person including: the revealed truths of creation, sin, grace, justification, merit, and final glory. It also addresses questions regarding the relationship between natural and supernatural ends, and between the human person’s supernatural vocation and role in the world. Special attention is given to how such content informs lay pastoral leadership and effective ministry.

3 Credits

700-01
Grace and Eschatology
 
TF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
E. Koop
 
09/05 - 12/20
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41029
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 41029

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Evan Koop

This course examines the mystery of divine grace as the self-gift of God to the human person and the means by which fallen humanity is restored and elevated to friendship with God. It explores the nature of grace and its anthropological and ecclesiological effects. Among the fundamental questions considered are the relationship between grace and human freedom, the notion of merit, and the Catholic understanding of predestination.

3 Credits

706-01
Theology of the Trinity
 
TF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
J. Froula
 
09/05 - 12/20
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 40512
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 101

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 101

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 40512

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  John Froula

Consideration is given to the nature, attributes, and activity of God; as well as the natural knowledge of God and language about God. The course also considers how the understanding of God shapes the Christian life. Prerequisites: DVDT 501 and DVDT 504; dual-degree students may substitute for DVDT 661.

3 Credits

733-01
Rdgs Aquin: Sum Theo Sec Secun
 
TR 1:15 pm - 2:45 pm
B. Wanless
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/8/0
Lecture
CRN 42959
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 108

 

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 108

     

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 42959

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Brandon Wanless

The course will examine the method, thought, and personality of Aquinas as well as the historical context and contemporary relvance of his work. This course emphasizes careful reading of selected texts of the Secunda secundae of the Summa Theologiae.

3 Credits

800-02
Readings in Patristic Theology
 
TR 1:15 pm - 2:45 pm
E. Koop
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/16/1
Lecture
CRN 42961
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 1
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 101

 

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 101

     

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 42961

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

901-90
Continuous Enrollment/Research
 
See Instructor
K. Snyder
 
09/05 - 12/20
50/0/0
Dissertation/Thesis
CRN 40773
0 Cr.
Size: 50
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 40773

Dissertation/Thesis

St Paul: No Room

DVHS: Historical Studies (Div.)

501-01
CH1: Patristic & Medieval Eras
 
TF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
K. Snyder
 
09/05 - 12/20
25/10/0
Lecture
CRN 40397
3 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

   

Subject: Historical Studies (Div.) (DVHS)

CRN: 40397

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Kenneth Snyder

This course studies the history of Christianity from its origins to the late Middle Ages of the fifteenth century. It requires a critical analysis of primary source documents, examining the historical origins of church institutions, practices, and doctrines. Attention is given to the interaction of social, political, cultural, and theological factors that shaped and influenced the Christian tradition throughout the Patristic and Medieval eras.

3 Credits

DVLS: Language Studies (Div.)

505-01
Basic Ecclesiastical Latin I
 
MF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
F. Gallas
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 43109
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

     

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

   

Subject: Language Studies (Div.) (DVLS)

CRN: 43109

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Fr. John Gallas

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of Ecclesiastical Latin, that is, the Latin language as it developed within the context of the liturgical, legal, and intellectual life of the Western Church. It emphasizes the essentials of grammar and syntax and develops the vocabulary necessary for praying in the language of the Church and for thoughtful engagement of her intellectual tradition in preparation for the Catholic priesthood.

3 Credits

507-01
Intermediate Eccl. Latin I
 
MF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
A. Thomas
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/7/0
Lecture
CRN 43116
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

     

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

   

Subject: Language Studies (Div.) (DVLS)

CRN: 43116

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Anthony Thomas

This course focuses on the Latin of the Vulgate, as well as Roman Catholic liturgical texts.  Additionally, it will introduce students to original texts of the Catholic theological and doctrinal tradition. Students will continue to broaden their vocabulary and reading skills of ecclesiastical Latin.  It emphasizes the essentials of grammar and syntax and develops the vocabulary necessary for praying in the language of the Church and for thoughtful engagement of her intellectual tradition in preparation for the Catholic priesthood.

3 Credits

DVMT: Moral Theology (Div.)

601-01
Fundamental Moral Theology
 
TF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
B. Wanless
 
09/05 - 12/20
21/19/0
Lecture
CRN 40920
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 105

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 105

   

Subject: Moral Theology (Div.) (DVMT)

CRN: 40920

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Brandon Wanless

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles of Catholic moral theology. Special attention is given to the sources of morality, moral decision-making, the natural law tradition in conscience formation, and Catholic social thought. In M.Div. sections, the course includes the assessment of human actions especially in light of the sacrament of Reconciliation.

3 Credits

725-01
Catholic Social Teaching
 
TF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
R. Kennedy
 
09/05 - 12/20
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41030
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

   

Subject: Moral Theology (Div.) (DVMT)

CRN: 41030

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Robert Kennedy

This course provides an overview of the Church’s social teaching as found in Scripture and ecclesial documents. It promotes the vision of the common good that unites the principles of Catholic social thought and their implications for contemporary issues and life in community. Finally, it explores ways to integrate the vision and principles in the preparation of homilies. Prerequisite: DVMT 601 or permission by instructor.

3 Credits

DVPH: Philosophy (Div.)

510-01
Logic for Theology
 
TR 10:00 am - 11:30 am
E. Pedersen
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 43111
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC LL19

 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC LL19

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 43111

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19

  Erik Pedersen

This course introduces students to philosophical logic and the basic forms of reasoning necessary for theological studies and priestly ministry. It also aims to show examples of these patterns of reasoning, with a special emphasis on the work of Thomas Aquinas. The course familiarizes students with the lexicon, distinctions, and intellectual habits necessary to approach existential questions of perennial importance. Students learn to apply principles of logic to reading and writing for future theological studies in preparation for the Catholic priesthood.

3 Credits

511-01
Philosophical Anthropology
 
TR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
B. Evans
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 43113
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 43113

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19

  Bryce Evans

This course introduces students to the fundamental question: “What does it mean to be human?”  Special attention is given to this question in the work of Thomas Aquinas, whose philosophical anthropology provides the normative foundation for the Church’s intellectual, doctrinal, and moral reflection.  It also addresses contemporary challenges to Christian anthropology.  This course is offered as preparation for the Catholic priesthood. 

3 Credits

514-01
Epistemology
 
MF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
E. Pedersen
 
09/05 - 12/20
10/7/0
Lecture
CRN 43122
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

     

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

   

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 43122

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19

  Erik Pedersen

This course treats epistemology within the larger context of both a phenomenology of the knowing subject and a psychology of the soul, especially as these are rooted in the philosophical tradition of metaphysical realism.  The course focuses principally on the contributions of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas to the question of the intellect’s relation to the order of being.

3 Credits

515-01
Metaphysics
 
TR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
W. Grant
 
09/05 - 12/20
10/7/0
Lecture
CRN 43123
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 43123

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  W. Matthews Grant

This course is an examination of what Aristotle called “First Philosophy.”  That is, it is an inquiry into the nature of being as such.  Special attention will be paid to questions of essence and existence, substance and accidents, form and matter, potency and act, and causality, as well as the analogy of being and the transcendental attributes of being.

3 Credits

520-01
Ancient Philosophy
 
MF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
C. Toner
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 43115
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC LL19

     

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC LL19

   

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 43115

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19

  Chris Toner

This course provides an introductory survey of the sources of philosophical inquiry in the Ancient Greek, Roman and/or Judeo-Christian sources. Special attention will be given to the works of the Pre-Socratics, Plato and Aristotle. In addition, some attention will be given to philosophical principles considered in the Hebrew Bible and the Christian New Testament where appropriate. This course is offered as preparation for the Catholic priesthood.

3 Credits

522-01
Modern Philosophy
 
TR 10:00 am - 11:30 am
D. Clemenson
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/7/0
Lecture
CRN 43117
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 43117

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  David Clemenson

This course provides an introductory survey of the major philosophical figures from the sixteen to the twentieth century. Special attention will also be given to how those figures and their respective philosophical views intersect with the main outlines of Roman Catholic intellectual tradition of the same period. This course is offered as preparation for the Catholic priesthood.

3 Credits

DVPT: Pastoral Theology (Div.)

500-01
Teaching Parish I.A
 
R 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
TBD
 
09/05 - 12/20
25/10/0
Lecture
CRN 40592
1 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 40592

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Instructor: TBD

This course provides foundational theological principles derived from a variety of ecclesial documents for the formation of a pastor’s heart in the pattern of the Good Shepherd and with the love Christ has for the Church. Seminarians begin to observe pastoral practice in their teaching parishes, reflecting on how God is calling them to be shepherds of souls. Through frequent interactions with parish staff, the formation of and meetings with a teaching parish committee, and regular attendance at church events and liturgies, students become acquainted with the history and distinctive characteristics of their respective parishes.

1 Credits

512-01
Community Leadership
 
See Details
S. Gideon
 
09/05 - 12/20
25/10/0
Lecture
CRN 40902
2 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:30 am
9:30 am
In Person

   

8:30 am
9:30 am
In Person

     

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 40902

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Stephen Gideon, Elena Zolnick

The course provides an introduction to the basic skills of community leadership necessary for priestly ministry. It presents principles and practices necessary for public speaking, leadership, and teaching in diverse settings. The course includes acquiring skills to build community and to provide effective catechetical formation in multicultural parish contexts.

2 Credits

600-01
Teaching Parish II.A
 
W 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
TBD
 
09/05 - 12/20
21/19/0
Lecture
CRN 40593
1 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
BEC 105

       

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 40593

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

Instructor: TBD

This course provides an introduction to how a parish passes on the “Good News of Jesus Christ” through educational and catechetical programs. Seminarians learn effective pastoral planning as an outgrowth of lesson planning. As they learn to apply various educational principles, students engage in teaching activities with young parishioners who participate in sacramental preparation sessions, faith formation/religious education classes, and/or school programs. Theological reflection continues with the pastor and teaching parish committee, along with a review of the seminarian’s teaching experiences. Prerequisite: DVPT 501

1 Credits

602-01
Gen Principles Ch Law
 
TF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
F. Johnson
 
09/05 - 12/20
21/19/0
Lecture
CRN 40555
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 105

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 105

   

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 40555

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Fr. Michael Johnson

This course treats briefly the history and status of Canon Law and the norms governing its interpretation. It focuses on the first four books of the 1983 Code of Canon Law: General Norms, the People of God, the Teaching Office of the Church, and the Sacraments. The course serves as a foundation for addressing canonical issues and questions arising in pastoral ministry.

3 Credits

609-01
Cath Schools & School Law
 
Online
TBD
 
09/05 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41241
3 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 41241

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Instructor: TBD

This course equips students with the necessary practical tools for Catholic school leaders to navigate the complexities of the law as it applies to both private and Catholic schools. From the Code of Canon Law to local, state, and federal statutes and regulations, this course includes instruction on all levels of the law while maintaining a core focus on employment law and school-related law for the distinct mission and ministry of Catholic education. Beginning with a broad understanding of law as articulated by St. Thomas Aquinas, and then moving on to practical implications of underlying principles and practices, the course applies legal reasoning and Catholic moral teaching as it examines student-handbooks, hiring practices, employee-handbooks, and legal issues in light of specific cases that typically arise in Catholic schools.

3 Credits

612-01
Found Personal & Eccl Prayer
 
M 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
J. Vander Ploeg
 
09/05 - 12/20
12/5/0
Lecture
CRN 42968
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 105

           

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 42968

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Jon Vander Ploeg

This course introduces students to the theological foundations and spiritual practices that serve as the basis of both personal and ecclesial prayer in the Catholic tradition. It provides students with the knowledge and tools they need to develop a personal habit of prayer, including exposure to the classical forms of Catholic devotional prayer. It then prepares students to lead the ecclesial community in prayer for rites other than the Eucharist including ministry to the sick, presiding and preaching the Liturgy of the Hours, catechumenate rites, wake and graveside services, and services of Word and Communion.

3 Credits

620-01
Intro to Homiletics
 
See Details
F. Monshau
 
09/05 - 12/20
21/19/0
Lecture
CRN 41028
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 105

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 105

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 105

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 105

     

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 41028

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Father Michael Monshau

This course introduces the theory and practice of homiletics, surveying homiletic history and recent Church documents. It focuses on the integration of Scripture and liturgy with congregational needs and the preacher’s character. The course equips students with methods of homiletic preparation and delivery that encourage on-going development in the art of preaching. Prerequisite: DVPT 512.

3 Credits

670-01
Applied Cath School Leadership
 
Online
K. Ferdinandt
 
09/05 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41242
1 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 41242

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

  Kevin Ferdinandt

In this course, each student is paired with an experienced Catholic school leader who will provide on-site mentorship to the student at a Catholic school throughout the academic year. This course allows students to apply the theoretical principles and strategies of Catholic school leadership presented in their coursework to real situations in the Catholic school in order to increase the effectiveness of their practice as a Catholic school leader. Students are able to gain valuable experience in the Catholic school and immediate support for this demanding role. Periodic online class meetings provide an opportunity for students to reflect on their experiences, challenges, and goals in light of the mentorship experience. Prerequisite: DVPT 575

1 Credits

713-01
Pastoral Counseling
 
M 8:15 am - 10:30 am
TBD
 
09/05 - 12/20
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 41086
2 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
10:30 am
BEC 101

           

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 41086

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

Instructor: TBD

This course develops the skills and perspective needed for the priest in his role as pastoral counselor. Drawing upon the contributions of psychology and Catholic anthropology, it develops skills needed for effective counseling interactions with attention given to the issues of appropriate boundaries and resources for referral. Prior field experience is presumed.

2 Credits

740-01
Teaching Parish III.A
 
M 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
TBD
 
09/05 - 12/20
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 40613
1 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
BEC 108

           

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 40613

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

Instructor: TBD

This course provides seminarians with experience in building relationships with diverse cultural groups in the parish and local community. Participants learn about the needs of the local community and apply principles of Catholic social teaching to the pastoral context, developing sensitivity for cultural differences and promoting a charitable attitude towards other religious traditions. Seminarians also engage in critical self-reflection to discern the differences between personal preferences, cultural practices, and matters of Catholic faith. Prerequisite: DVPT 500

1 Credits

795-01
Teaching Parish IV.A
 
W 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
TBD
 
09/05 - 12/20
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 42077
0 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
BEC 101

       

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 42077

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

Instructor: TBD

This supervised ministry course provides fourth-year seminarians with opportunities to gain a greater understanding of the pastoral care given in a parish setting through participation in the Teaching Parish Program as they progress through the diaconate toward ordination to the priesthood. By completing the tasks outlined in the Teaching Parish Program Manual for Theology IV Fall Semester, seminarians gain valuable experience in the work of pastoral care with a particular emphasis on the continued improvement of preaching. Prerequisite: DVPT 790

0 Credits

DVSS: Sacred Scripture (Div.)

511-01
Pentateuch & Historical Books
 
MR 10:00 am - 11:30 am
J. Cavins
 
09/05 - 12/20
25/10/0
Lecture
CRN 40513
3 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

     

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 40513

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Jeff Cavins

This course studies the Pentateuch and Historical Books using the principles of Catholic hermeneutics. It examines and critiques a plurality of approaches available to the interpreter and addresses texts dealing with theological themes such as promise, election, covenant, and fidelity.

3 Credits

525-01
Survey/ Old Test Literature
 
M 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
P. Niskanen
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/8/0
Lecture
CRN 42962
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 108

           

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 42962

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Paul Niskanen

Surveys the major genre within the Old Testament canon and examines the principles of interpretation employed in the analysis of the texts. Stresses a plurality of approaches available to the interpreter while teaching the classical methods of biblical interpretation. The course also introduces Catholic views of canon, inspiration, and interpretation.

3 Credits

707-01
Johannine Lit. & Cath. Letters
 
MR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
F. Carl
 
09/05 - 12/20
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 40398
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

     

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 40398

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Fr. Scott Carl

This course presents the literary composition, structure, and theology of the Fourth Gospel, stressing its unique and complementary aspects relative to the Synoptic Gospels in revealing the person of Jesus Christ. Moreover, this course also examines the Catholic Letters and the Book of Revelation. Special attention is given to methods of interpretation and to issues that pertain to modern concerns. Prerequisite: DVSS 521 or DVSS 530.

3 Credits

741-01
Wisdom & Deuterocanonical Lit.
 
R 8:15 am - 11:15 am
S. Hoffmann
 
09/05 - 12/20
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 41088
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

8:15 am
11:15 am
BEC 101

     

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 41088

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Sr. Mary Micaela Hoffmann

This course examines Old Testament wisdom literature and the deuterocanonical books, focusing on their composition, structure, theology, and implications for ecumenical dialogue. In addition, it treats how Second Temple Judaism influences the development of the New Testament.

3 Credits

741-02
Wisdom & Deuterocanonical Lit.
 
W 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
S. Hoffmann
 
09/05 - 12/20
12/6/0
Lecture
CRN 42965
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 108

       

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 42965

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Sr. Mary Micaela Hoffmann

This course examines Old Testament wisdom literature and the deuterocanonical books, focusing on their composition, structure, theology, and implications for ecumenical dialogue. In addition, it treats how Second Temple Judaism influences the development of the New Testament.

3 Credits

DVST: Sacred Theology (Div.)

601-01
Eucharist
 
TF 1:15 pm - 2:45 pm
F. Gallas
 
09/05 - 12/20
21/19/0
Lecture
CRN 40399
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 105

   

1:15 pm
2:45 pm
BEC 105

   

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 40399

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Fr. John Gallas

Through the study of Scripture, patristic sources, and magisterial documents, this course explores the meaning of the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist, the sacramental and sacrificial nature of the Mass, and the effects of the Eucharist. Special attention is given to the relationship between the Eucharist and Christology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology. Prerequisite: DVDT 504; DVST 501 is recommended.

3 Credits

605-01
Liturgy and Sacraments
 
TBD
TBD
 
TBD
12/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41901
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 41901

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Instructor: TBD

This course presents the revelatory, sacramental, and ecclesial principles of Catholic liturgical worship.The course examines the theology of the seven sacraments with special attention to the Eucharist, including an analysis of the sacraments in terms of sign, matter, form, cause, effects, minister, and recipient. The ecclesiological and spiritual implications of the Church’s liturgy are also addressed.

3 Credits

608-01
Sacramental Theology
 
R 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
J. Froula
 
09/05 - 12/20
15/7/0
Lecture
CRN 42964
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 108

     

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 42964

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  John Froula

This course examines the principles of sacramental theology with emphasis on the Eucharist and its celebration. It addresses the Sacraments as efficacious signs and participation in the Christian Mysteries. The subject is approached from the perspective of Scripture and the theological tradition as informed by Church teaching.

3 Credits

701-01
Christian Marriage
 
See Details
J. Floeder
 
09/05 - 12/20
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41031
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/05 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

     

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 41031

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  John Floeder, Joseph Taphorn

This course examines the theology and praxis of Christian sacramental marriage, including an overview of the rite, Roman Catholic Canon Law concerning marriage, and proper pastoral preparation of engaged couples. It treats the ends of marriage and how they are morally fulfilled, the natural complementarity of man and woman as the basis of the marriage bond, and the family as the domestic Church. Prerequisite: DVPT 602 and DVST 501.

3 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

222-L01
Catholic Literary Tradition
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
10/6/0
Lecture
CRN 42206
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 209

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 209

       

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 42206

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

What makes a text a work of Catholic literature? How do Catholic writers struggle with the existential questions of meaning, purpose, or suffering in a unique fashion? How do the themes they engage—such as forgiveness, redemption, or the power of grace in the world—place them within the Catholic tradition? Is there a sacramental imagination or incarnational theology at the root of a work of Catholic literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Catholic literature in both English and translation from the medieval era through the present. This course satisfies an Integration in the Humanities requirement and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement; it also satisfies a Historical Perspectives requirement for English majors and a a Traditions 200-level course requirement for Catholic Studies majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. NOTE: This is a cross-listed class with Catholic Studies, with 10 seats available on the ENGL 222 side and 10 seats available on the CATH 222 side.

4 Credits

337-L01
Reading for Abolition
 
See Details
K. Chowdhury
ENGL*Core 
09/04 - 12/20
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 42210
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 301

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 301

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 42210

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Context and Convergences
     Narrative Medicine Minor Appr
     English Diversity Req.
     Writing to learn

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity
     UG Core Literature/Writing

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Kanishka Chowdhury, Amy Finnegan

This course traces the genealogies of abolition from the efforts to end slavery in this country through contemporary calls to abolish the prison industrial complex. Briefly, in its contemporary incarnation, Abolition is a political method and practice that calls into question existing punishment systems and political and economic formations that perpetuate violence. In this course, we will explore the work of those who practice this philosophy, extending their invitation to dream boldly and lead with care and accountability in how we respond to harm and violence. We will engage literature that helps us understand the essence of abolition and why people across generations have found it useful. We will also familiarize ourselves with contemporary abolitionist practices in the world and invite our learning community to interrogate collectively root causes of violence and imagine a world we long for. We will read essays by Gloria Anzaldúa, W.E.B. DuBois, Angela Davis, Nick Estes, Fred Moten, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Mariame Kaba, and David Walker, and fiction, poetry, and plays by Octavia Butler, Natalie Diaz, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, and August Wilson, among others. This course satisfies an Integration in the Humanities requirement; the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and major/minor requirements for English and Justice and Peace Studies students. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with JPST 298-L01; there are 12 seats on the ENGL 337-L01 side and 8 seats on the JPST 298-L01 side.

4 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

250-01
Intro to Justice & Peace
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
TBD
CGLCFAPXSUSTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
25/25/1
Lecture
CRN 40447
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 40447

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Major aspects of world and local conflict, theories of social science relating to conflict and violence, and various proposals for solutions. Among the aspects of conflict studied are cultural differences, scarcity of resources, economic and social structures, international trade, the arms race, corruption, oppression and war. Proposed solutions assessed include development, structural changes, world governance, multinational agencies, military power, civilian-based defense, active nonviolence for social change, conflict resolution, disarmament, cultural exchange, religious revival and prayer. These topics are considered in the light of theory, history, and literature. Students apply these concepts by investigating one country or geographic area in depth through a semester long research project. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

250-02
Intro to Justice & Peace
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
TBD
CGLCFAPXSUSTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
25/25/0
Lecture
CRN 41439
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 202

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 202

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 41439

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Major aspects of world and local conflict, theories of social science relating to conflict and violence, and various proposals for solutions. Among the aspects of conflict studied are cultural differences, scarcity of resources, economic and social structures, international trade, the arms race, corruption, oppression and war. Proposed solutions assessed include development, structural changes, world governance, multinational agencies, military power, civilian-based defense, active nonviolence for social change, conflict resolution, disarmament, cultural exchange, religious revival and prayer. These topics are considered in the light of theory, history, and literature. Students apply these concepts by investigating one country or geographic area in depth through a semester long research project. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W01
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Finnegan
AMCDCGLCFAPXCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/20/4
Lecture
CRN 40575
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 4
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OSS 313

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OSS 313

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 40575

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 313

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W02
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Finnegan
AMCDCGLCFAPXCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/19/1
Lecture
CRN 41954
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 222

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 222

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 41954

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W03
Active Nonviolence
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
O. Okoi
AMCDCGLCFAPXCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/20/1
Lecture
CRN 41955
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 308

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 308

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 41955

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 308

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Obasesam Okoi

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W04
Active Nonviolence
 
MW 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
TBD
AMCDCGLCFAPXCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 42044
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
LIB LL21

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
LIB LL21

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 42044

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Library LL21

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

296-01
Making Art for Social Justice
 
W 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
CGoodCore 
09/04 - 12/20
25/14/0
Lecture
CRN 43054
2 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 305

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 43054

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 305

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

Students will explore the intersections of art and social justice with a focus on visual arts and social movements in the Twin Cities. Topics of study will include public art, protest art, expression and censorship, issues of art access and accessibility, social movement theory, aesthetic theory, and the Twin Cities as a unique space for social practice art. The class will collaborate with Nikki McComb who uses art to push for social change. In 2016, she launched her #Enough campaign — an artistic effort to end gun violence in Minneapolis and surrounding areas through #ArtIsMyWeapon exhibitions and projects.

2 Credits

297-01
Soc Policy In A Changing World
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
O. Okoi
SUSTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42548
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305K

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305K

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 42548

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305K

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Obasesam Okoi

This course provides an overview of the concepts, debates and theories of global social policy, the key actors and policy-making processes, and the different approaches to social policy within different global contexts. It examines the major trends and challenges facing social policy in today’s rapidly changing world and the values on which they are based as well as key critiques of those trends. Locating social policy within the context of globalization processes, this course explores a deeper understanding of the major challenges facing the global community, including poverty, inequality, education, health care, unemployment, population, migration, refugee resettlement, human trafficking, climate change, environmental governance, the growing influence of digital technologies, and the changing nature of work. The course also explores the roles of international organizations, such as the United Nations, the World Bank, the World Health Organization, transnational corporations, international non-governmental organizations, and transnational advocacy networks in shaping global social policy. This course will equip students with the knowledge and skills to analyze global social policy issues and to be policy leaders in this context.

4 Credits

298-L01
Topic: Reading for Abolition
 
See Details
A. Finnegan
ENGL*FAPXCore 
09/04 - 12/20
5/1/0
Lecture
CRN 42847
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 301

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 301

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 42847

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Narrative Medicine Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan, Kanishka Chowdhury

This course traces the genealogies of abolition from the efforts to end slavery in this country through contemporary calls to abolish the prison industrial complex. Briefly, in its contemporary incarnation, Abolition is a political method and practice that calls into question existing punishment systems and political and economic formations that perpetuate violence. In this course, we will explore the work of those who practice this philosophy, extending their invitation to dream boldly and lead with care and accountability in how we respond to harm and violence. We will engage literature that helps us understand the essence of abolition and why people across generations have found it useful. We will also familiarize ourselves with contemporary abolitionist practices in the world and invite our learning community to interrogate collectively root causes of violence and imagine a world we long for. We will read essays by Gloria Anzaldúa, W.E.B. DuBois, Angela Davis, Nick Estes, Fred Moten, Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Mariame Kaba, and David Walker, and fiction, poetry, and plays by Octavia Butler, Natalie Diaz, Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Colson Whitehead, and August Wilson, among others. This course satisfies an Integration in the Humanities requirement; the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and major/minor requirements for English and Justice and Peace Studies students. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with JENGL 337-L01; there are 8 seats on the JPST 298-L01 side and 12 seats on the ENGL 337-L01 side.

4 Credits

365-D01
Leadership for Social Justice
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
AMCDFAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/9/0
Lecture
CRN 40760
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 211

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 211

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 40760

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 211

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

Leadership for Social Justice examines the arc of leadership through the process of creating, sustaining, then institutionalizing positive social change. The course examines models and case studies of authoritative, positional, influential and situational leadership in diverse settings such as community organizing, social movements, social entrepreneurship and nonprofit management. The course also explores approaches to ethical leadership and provides opportunities for students to develop the skills and vision needed to become ethical leaders for social justice. Students will analyze the role of leadership in the tensions between preserving order and promoting transformation. They will develop a critical approach to the dynamics of power in order to effect systemic change. Prerequisites: 80 completed credits

4 Credits

473-01
Vocational Internship Seminar
 
M 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
O. Okoi
 
09/04 - 12/20
15/6/0
Lecture
CRN 40554
0 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:00 pm
MHC 211

           

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 40554

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 211

  Obasesam Okoi

Students are required to take this seminar during the semester they are doing an internship of 7-10 hrs/wk. The seminar meets three times (at the beginning, middle, and end of the semester), to provide opportunities for those engaged in individual placements to get peer support for their discernment process. At its core is a reflective process designed to lead students to: a deeper understanding of the practical means of working for social change; an evaluation of their internship experience (both in terms of gaining a deeper understanding of their own vocation and a better understanding of the type of institutions they are working with); and applying these insights to future course work and career planning.

0 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

110-01
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
M. Kent
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/5
Lecture
CRN 41136
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 5
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 209

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 209

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 209

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41136

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Matthew Kent

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-04
The Person and the Good
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Kent
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/5
Lecture
CRN 42419
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 5
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL01

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42419

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Matthew Kent

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-05
The Person and the Good
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
E. Jerndal
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 42420
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42420

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Emma Jerndal

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-06
The Person and the Good
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
E. Jerndal
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 42421
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 203

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 203

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42421

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Emma Jerndal

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-07
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
J. Stuchlik
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 40206
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 40206

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-08
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
J. Stuchlik
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 40207
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 205

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 205

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 205

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 40207

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-09
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
R. Lemmons
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 40208
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 40208

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Rose Mary Lemmons

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-11
The Person and the Good
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
J. Kronen
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 41133
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 247

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 247

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41133

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-12
The Person and the Good
 
TR 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
J. Kronen
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/20/0
Lecture
CRN 40217
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
JRC 247

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
JRC 247

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 40217

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-13
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
C. Toner
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 40210
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL62

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL62

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL62

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 40210

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Toner

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-14
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
C. Toner
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 41137
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41137

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Toner

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-15
The Person and the Good
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Rota
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 41138
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41138

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-17
The Person and the Good
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
TBD
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 41140
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 247

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 247

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41140

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-19
The Person and the Good
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
TBD
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 41141
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41141

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-20
The Person and the Good
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
TBD
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 41142
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 206

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 206

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41142

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-21
The Person and the Good
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
TBD
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/17/0
Lecture
CRN 41143
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41143

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-22
The Person and the Good
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
TBD
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 42061
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42061

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-23
The Person and the Good
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
TBD
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/21/0
Lecture
CRN 41144
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41144

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-24
The Person and the Good
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
H. Giebel
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/1
Lecture
CRN 41523
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41523

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-27
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. Rota
CGLCCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 42075
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 203

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 203

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 203

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42075

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE CommGood/Learning Comm

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-30
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
TBD
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
30/5/0
Lecture
CRN 43309
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 234

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 234

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 234

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 43309

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 234

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

210-01
Chinese Philosophy
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Laumakis
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/12/0
Lecture
CRN 42427
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42427

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

Chinese philosophy embodies three ancient traditions: Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Both Confucianism and Daoism are indigenous to China while Buddhism was imported from India. This course will explore each of these three traditions as well as their interactions and influences on major periods of Chinese history. It will also consider the similarities and differences between “Chinese” and “Western” conceptions of philosophy. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-13
Sig.Work: Chinese Philosophy
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Laumakis
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42490
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42490

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

Chinese philosophy embodies three ancient traditions: Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism. Both Confucianism and Daoism are indigenous to China while Buddhism was imported from India. This course will explore each of these three traditions as well as their interactions and influences on major periods of Chinese history. It will also consider the similarities and differences between “Chinese” and “Western” conceptions of philosophy. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

218-W01
Philosophy of Sport
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
S. Laumakis
BizCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/20/5
Lecture
CRN 41799
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 5
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 222

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 222

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41799

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Sports Management Minor
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

An in-depth philosophical examination of conceptual, moral, cultural, and legal issues surrounding regulating, watching, and participating in sports. Possible topics include: the definition of sport; the nature of competition; sportsmanship; being a fan; performance-enhancing drugs; gender; race; and the relationships among athletics, moral education, the law, and social responsibility in high school, collegiate, and professional sports. The course will integrate various disciplinary perspectives on the nature and practice of sport, especially perspectives from philosophical ethics, law, and sociology. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 218 and the less in-depth 2-credit version of the course, PHIL 219. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

218-W02
Philosophy of Sport
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
S. Laumakis
BizCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/20/8
Lecture
CRN 42428
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 8
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 222

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 222

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42428

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Sports Management Minor
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

An in-depth philosophical examination of conceptual, moral, cultural, and legal issues surrounding regulating, watching, and participating in sports. Possible topics include: the definition of sport; the nature of competition; sportsmanship; being a fan; performance-enhancing drugs; gender; race; and the relationships among athletics, moral education, the law, and social responsibility in high school, collegiate, and professional sports. The course will integrate various disciplinary perspectives on the nature and practice of sport, especially perspectives from philosophical ethics, law, and sociology. Students cannot receive credit for both PHIL 218 and the less in-depth 2-credit version of the course, PHIL 219. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

220-01
Logic
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Distelzweig
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
21/18/0
Lecture
CRN 41800
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 454

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 454

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41800

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

220-02
Logic
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
P. Distelzweig
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/12/0
Lecture
CRN 42429
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305J

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305J

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42429

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305J

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/20/29
Lecture
CRN 41892
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 29
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41892

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-01
Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
10/10/3
Lecture
CRN 41802
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 3
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41802

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This Signature Work section of Disability and Human Dignity is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

230-02
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/27
Lecture
CRN 42431
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 27
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42431

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

231-W01
Philosophies of Social Justice
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
T. Feeney
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
18/18/5
Lecture
CRN 42432
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 5
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 222

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 222

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 222

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42432

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-W03
Sig.Wk: Phil.of Social Justice
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
T. Feeney
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
2/2/1
Lecture
CRN 42485
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 222

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 222

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 222

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42485

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

234-01
Love, Sex, & Friendship
 
Online
C. Deavel
FASTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
23/23/17
Lecture
CRN 42433
4 Cr.
Size: 23
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 17
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42433

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

This course examines the nature of human love, particularly within marriages and families. Possible topics include: romantic love, sex, dating, and marriage; true friends and friendships of selfish pleasure or advantage; love of family, strangers, and those one doesn’t like; the nature of love (is it a feeling? Is it an act of will?); reciprocity, permanence, and fidelity; love within families, especially spousal and parent/child bonds. Attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-04
Sig.Wk: Love,Sex,& Friendship
 
Online
C. Deavel
FASTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
7/7/2
Lecture
CRN 42484
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 2
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42484

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

This course examines the nature of human love, particularly within marriages and families. Possible topics include: romantic love, sex, dating, and marriage; true friends and friendships of selfish pleasure or advantage; love of family, strangers, and those one doesn’t like; the nature of love (is it a feeling? Is it an act of will?); reciprocity, permanence, and fidelity; love within families, especially spousal and parent/child bonds. Attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

234-02
Love, Sex, & Friendship
 
Online
C. Deavel
FASTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/30/22
Lecture
CRN 42434
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 22
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42434

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

This course examines the nature of human love, particularly within marriages and families. Possible topics include: romantic love, sex, dating, and marriage; true friends and friendships of selfish pleasure or advantage; love of family, strangers, and those one doesn’t like; the nature of love (is it a feeling? Is it an act of will?); reciprocity, permanence, and fidelity; love within families, especially spousal and parent/child bonds. Attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

235-01
Politics, Law, and Common Good
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. Stuchlik
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
30/22/0
Lecture
CRN 41873
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41873

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-06
Sig.Wk:Politics,Law&CommonGood
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. Stuchlik
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
0/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41875
4 Cr.
Size: 0
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41875

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

240-01
Faith and Doubt
 
Online
M. Lu
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
28/28/11
Lecture
CRN 41803
4 Cr.
Size: 28
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 11
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41803

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mathew Lu

This course focuses on Natural Theology and the capacity of natural reason to know God. We will explore some of the most important ways that philosophers have argued for the existence of God and various divine properties through natural reason alone. We will also consider some important critiques of Natural Theology. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-07
Sig.Work: Faith and Doubt
 
Online
M. Lu
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
2/2/0
Lecture
CRN 41804
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41804

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mathew Lu

This course focuses on Natural Theology and the capacity of natural reason to know God. We will explore some of the most important ways that philosophers have argued for the existence of God and various divine properties through natural reason alone. We will also consider some important critiques of Natural Theology. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

245-01
Philosophy of Art and Beauty
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/16/0
Lecture
CRN 41878
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 126

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 126

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41878

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

What does it mean for something to be beautiful? Is beauty an objective property of things or is it entirely in the eye of the beholder? Are perceiving beauty, making beautiful things, and being beautiful essential to a flourishing human life? Should beauty be any more important to us than other aesthetic qualities like elegance, ugliness, horror, or being cool? What does it take for something to be a work of art? Do the answers to any of these questions have anything to do with God? In this class, we’ll talk about these questions and about some ways that philosophers have answered them. We’ll spend time discussing views from the ancient and medieval Catholic philosophical tradition. But we’ll spend most of the class discussing modern views, and some views on beauty and art from Indian and Japanese philosophy. Along the way, we’ll listen to some musical pieces, watch some films, and view some paintings that will help us better think about beauty and art. Our goal will be to come to a deeper appreciation of beauty and of its central role in a happy human life. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-08
Sig.Wk: Phil.of Art and Beauty
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41879
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 126

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 126

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41879

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

What does it mean for something to be beautiful? Is beauty an objective property of things or is it entirely in the eye of the beholder? Are perceiving beauty, making beautiful things, and being beautiful essential to a flourishing human life? Should beauty be any more important to us than other aesthetic qualities like elegance, ugliness, horror, or being cool? What does it take for something to be a work of art? Do the answers to any of these questions have anything to do with God? In this class, we’ll talk about these questions and about some ways that philosophers have answered them. We’ll spend time discussing views from the ancient and medieval Catholic philosophical tradition. But we’ll spend most of the class discussing modern views, and some views on beauty and art from Indian and Japanese philosophy. Along the way, we’ll listen to some musical pieces, watch some films, and view some paintings that will help us better think about beauty and art. Our goal will be to come to a deeper appreciation of beauty and of its central role in a happy human life. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

254-01
Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
BizSMMNCore 
09/04 - 12/20
27/26/0
Lecture
CRN 41880
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 247

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41880

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Busn Healthcare Minor Approved
     Sci, Med, Soc (SMDS) Minor

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Explore and analyze ethical issues related to clinical and social aspects of medicine—both from the perspective of Catholic intellectual tradition and from other philosophical perspectives. For example, what is the primary role of a medical practitioner: to give the “customer” what s/he wants, or to promote a more objective standard of health? Under what conditions should a physician or nurse be allowed to opt out of doing work that violates his or her conscience? Is euthanasia ethically acceptable, and should it be legally permitted? And (how) should we provide medical care to those who cannot afford to pay for it? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-09
Sig.Work: Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
BizSMMNCore 
09/04 - 12/20
3/3/0
Lecture
CRN 42482
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 247

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42482

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Busn Healthcare Minor Approved
     Sci, Med, Soc (SMDS) Minor
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Explore and analyze ethical issues related to clinical and social aspects of medicine—both from the perspective of Catholic intellectual tradition and from other philosophical perspectives. For example, what is the primary role of a medical practitioner: to give the “customer” what s/he wants, or to promote a more objective standard of health? Under what conditions should a physician or nurse be allowed to opt out of doing work that violates his or her conscience? Is euthanasia ethically acceptable, and should it be legally permitted? And (how) should we provide medical care to those who cannot afford to pay for it? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

254-02
Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
H. Giebel
BizSMMNCore 
09/04 - 12/20
30/24/0
Lecture
CRN 42435
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305K

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305K

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42435

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305K

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Busn Healthcare Minor Approved
     Sci, Med, Soc (SMDS) Minor

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Explore and analyze ethical issues related to clinical and social aspects of medicine—both from the perspective of Catholic intellectual tradition and from other philosophical perspectives. For example, what is the primary role of a medical practitioner: to give the “customer” what s/he wants, or to promote a more objective standard of health? Under what conditions should a physician or nurse be allowed to opt out of doing work that violates his or her conscience? Is euthanasia ethically acceptable, and should it be legally permitted? And (how) should we provide medical care to those who cannot afford to pay for it? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-10
Sig.Work: Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
H. Giebel
BizSMMNCore 
09/04 - 12/20
0/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42481
4 Cr.
Size: 0
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305K

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305K

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42481

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305K

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Busn Healthcare Minor Approved
     Sci, Med, Soc (SMDS) Minor
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Explore and analyze ethical issues related to clinical and social aspects of medicine—both from the perspective of Catholic intellectual tradition and from other philosophical perspectives. For example, what is the primary role of a medical practitioner: to give the “customer” what s/he wants, or to promote a more objective standard of health? Under what conditions should a physician or nurse be allowed to opt out of doing work that violates his or her conscience? Is euthanasia ethically acceptable, and should it be legally permitted? And (how) should we provide medical care to those who cannot afford to pay for it? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

255-01
Technology and Ethics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Winter
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/12/0
Lecture
CRN 41883
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41883

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-11
Sig.Wk: Technology and Ethics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Winter
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/1/0
Lecture
CRN 42480
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42480

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

255-40
HNR: Technology and Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Winter
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
15/8/0
Lecture
CRN 42437
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42437

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

This Honors section of Technology and Ethics is an application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and Honors.

4 Credits

301-40
HNR Sig.Wk: Technology&Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Winter
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42479
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42479

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

This honors section is an application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; at least 80 credits completed; and Honors.

4 Credits

265-W01
Minds, Brains, and Computers
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
19/15/0
Lecture
CRN 42443
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42443

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-W12
Sig.Wk:Minds,Brains,&Computers
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
1/1/0
Lecture
CRN 42478
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42478

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Signature Work
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115; and at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

301-L14
Sig.Work: Political Philosophy
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
R. Lemmons
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/1/0
Lecture
CRN 42487
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 208

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 208

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 208

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42487

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 208

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
  &nb