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GENG: English (Grad)

501-01
Intro Creative Writing & Publ
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
H. Bouwman
 
09/04 - 12/20
12/11/0
Lecture
CRN 42213
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 301

           

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 42213

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301

  Heather Bouwman

Introduction to Creative Writing and Publishing provides a primer to the expectations and conventions of graduate study in the field of creative writing, including creative writing pedagogy and practice, the running of a literary reading series, innovative forms of creative writing such as podcasting and interactive writing, as well as the study of the publishing world from the point of view of a writer, reader, and editor. Additionally, it will introduce students to the academic field of creative writing: its area of specialization, key issues, and forms of writing. How do writers orient themselves and their work in 21st century workshops? What are the tools that govern print design, interactive prose, or literary podcasts? What is the history of the publishing industry and how does that inform our present moment? This course is required for the Master of Arts in Creative Writing & Publishing and is an elective for the Master of Arts in English.

3 Credits

513-01
Intro to Grad Studies in ENGL
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
A. Muse
 
09/04 - 12/20
9/9/0
Lecture
CRN 41586
3 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 301

     

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 41586

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301

  Amy Muse

This course provides an introduction to the expectations and conventions of graduate study, including research and writing methodology. In addition, it will introduce students to the field of English studies: its areas of specialization, key issues, and genres of writing. This course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the MA in English program.

3 Credits

514-01
Genre Studies:Finding the Form
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
A. Muse
 
09/04 - 12/20
3/3/0
Lecture
CRN 43264
3 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 301

     

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 43264

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301

  Amy Muse

Finding the right form to transport the content of a piece of writing is something we tend to associate with creative writers. It is equally essential to literary scholars, who also search for the right form to convey their responses to a text. As we will explore, finding and making these forms of attention involve practices that are aesthetic, intellectual, political, ethical, psychological, even spiritual. This hybrid course on the reading of literature and the writing of literary criticism also serves as an introduction (or second chapter) to graduate studies in English, and we will ask perennial questions about the nature and purpose of literature and literary criticism, including questions about literary genre and the relationships between form and content. We will read a novel (Colum McCann's Apeirogon), a memoir (Kiese Laymon's Heavy), a play (Annie Baker's adaptation of Chekhov's Uncle Vanya), and a number of poems, examining the ways the authors’ choice of form affects our experience of reading their work. And we will read and practice writing literary criticism, studying how scholars wrestle with form in their writing about literature, and how writing criticism can help us sharpen our attention and deepen our reading. Writing assignments include short exercises, weekly letters, and a final essay for which you’ll find the form. Note: This cross-listed course can count as 513 for incoming students in the Lit track and it can count as an elective (514) for current students in the Lit track who have already taken 513. While this course may have some minimal overlap with 513, it differs significantly from that course. It has been specifically developed to meet student desire for an additional literature course option this semester.

3 Credits

529-01
Romantic Ecology
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Y. An
 
09/04 - 12/20
14/15/1
Lecture
CRN 42214
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 1
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 301

         

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 42214

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301

  Young-ok An

A study of British poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction prose from 1789 to 1850, including exploration of topics such as literary innovation, the Romantic self and imagination, Romantic ecology, the Gothic, the historical novel, and science fiction. Also examined are the relationship between literature and key social developments, such as the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, the equality of the sexes, the anti-slave trade movement, industrialization, and the scientific revolution. Authors covered may include Blake, Wollstonecraft, Scott, Wordsworth , Coleridge, Byron, Percy and Mary Shelley, Keats, Austen, and Hemans. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature requirement.

3 Credits

604-01
Writing Creative Nonfiction
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
M. Batt
 
09/04 - 12/20
12/12/0
Lecture
CRN 42215
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 301

       

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 42215

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301

  Matthew Batt

A workshop experience involving the ongoing exploration of subject matter and technique. Readings will include theoretical and creative texts. This course will also discuss fiction writing in publishing contexts -- how literary works are written, revised, submitted, acquired, edited, and marketed by presses. The course will also give students insight into broader issues in the publishing world such as the rise of small and independent presses, university presses, traditional major presses, as well as online publishing, self publishing, and issues of access and diversity in the literary marketplace. The course will include guest lectures or other engagements with agents and/or editors from the publishing community.

3 Credits


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