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ACCT: Accounting

410-01
Advanced Accounting
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
O. Asdemir
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
35/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42580
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Accounting (ACCT)

CRN: 42580

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Ozer Asdemir

The special accounting considerations of consolidated financial statements are considered in depth. Additional topics include foreign operations, partnerships, governments, and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and senior standing

4 Credits

BIOL: Biology

484-01
Complex Issues in Human Health
 
See Details
J. Illig
EdTrnCore 
09/04 - 10/23
16/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41765
2 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 10/23
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 41765

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

Online

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Jennifer Illig

Investigation of selected problems in biology at an advanced level, involving student presentations based on the primary literature. The subject will vary and will be announced in the annual Class Schedule.. These courses may, with approval of the department chair, be used to fulfill the 400-level requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Upper-class standing and permission of the instructor and 80 completed credits.

2 Credits

BLAW: Business Law

320-L01
Compliance in Business Orgs
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
S. Supina
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
35/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42618
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Business Law (BLAW)

CRN: 42618

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Stacey Supina

This course will examine the compliance function from a legal, ethical, functional and organizational perspective. It will consider the compliance function in contemporary business settings and industries, such as finance, health care, insurance, and retail. Practices of key regulatory agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission, Securities and Exchange Commission will be discussed along with contemporary regulatory statutes such as the FTC Act, Dodd-Frank, Sarbanes-Oxley, etc. The course will also examine key compliance processes and the means to ensure that compliance efforts are effective. Topics include audits and other internal governance approaches for discovering compliance problems in a timely fashion; investigations; reporting; mitigation; regulatory responses; and remediation. Prerequisites: BLAW 300, 301, 302, 303 or 304 and BETH 300 or BETH 301 and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

301-02
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41435
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
In Person

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
In Person

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
In Person

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41435

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

301-04
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41934
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41934

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

CISC: Computer & Info Sci (UG)

480-D01
Senior Capstone
 
MWF 2:55 pm - 4:00 pm
R. Hardt
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
26/0/0
Lecture
CRN 40106
4 Cr.
Size: 26
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

2:55 pm
4:00 pm
OSS 434

 

2:55 pm
4:00 pm
OSS 434

 

2:55 pm
4:00 pm
OSS 434

   

Subject: Computer & Info Sci (UG) (CISC)

CRN: 40106

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 434

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Ryan Hardt

The senior capstone course provides computer science majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students will work in groups to design, document, and implement a large-sized software project. During this process, students will be exposed to programming team organization, software development practices, as well as tools that facilitate the development of software systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- or better in: CISC 350, CISC 340, and CISC 380 (which 380 may be taken concurrently)

4 Credits

EDUC: Education (UG)

431-01
Learning Design with Tech
 
See Details
L. Payne
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42315
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
         

09/07:
10:15 am
11:15 am
In Person

10/19:
10:15 am
11:15 am
In Person

12/07:
10:15 am
11:15 am
In Person

 
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Education (UG) (EDUC)

CRN: 42315

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

Online

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Lucy Payne

This course examines learning theories, philosophies and their implications on the use of technology, as well as the history and development of learning technologies. Additionally, students will examine current trends and future challenges in education technology. Students will learn a variety of learning technologies and advocate sound integration of technology into curriculum. Issues on the design, development, and implementation of technology will be discussed. Students will integrate learning technologies into their curriculum planning in the specific content areas that address student needs and meet with the technology or content standards. As a capstone project, students will develop a portfolio to reflect upon the knowledge and skills acquired through their major. Prerequisites: EDUC 460 or 463, which can be taken concurrently, and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

ENGR: Engineering (UG)

480-01
Engineer Design Clinic I
 
See Details
T. Ling
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
125/0/0
Lecture
CRN 40424
4 Cr.
Size: 125
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

2:55 pm
5:10 pm
In Person

 

2:55 pm
5:10 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Engineering (UG) (ENGR)

CRN: 40424

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Tiffany Ling, Heather Orser

Serves as the first capstone course. Student design teams, under the direction of a faculty coordinator, will develop engineering solutions to practical, open-ended design projects conceived to demonstrate the value of prior basic science and engineering courses. Ethical, social, economic and safety issues in engineering practice will be considered as well. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in either (ENGR 320, 350, 371, and 381) or (ENGR 331, 346, and 410) or (CISC 231, ENGR 345, and concurrent-registration in-or prior completion of either ENGR 431 or ENGR 432) or (ENGR 362, 364, and 368)

4 Credits

ENTR: Entrepreneurship

450-01
Entr:Management/Strategy
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
TBD
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
24/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42680
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Entrepreneurship (ENTR)

CRN: 42680

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Instructor: TBD

This is the Entrepreneurship Concentration capstone course. This course builds upon previous coursework, drawing together critical concepts including opportunity identification, business modeling, financial modeling, and market/industry research skills. Through lecture, case discussion, and extensive use of the Hotwash Process, students polish their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. The primary deliverable is a Fundable Business Plan. Prerequisites: ENTR 100 or 200 or 260; and ENTR 250 or 350; and ENTR 370; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200 and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

EXSC: Exercise Science

449-D01
Research Seminar
 
TBD
TBD
Core 
TBD
20/0/0
Lecture/Lab
CRN 42194
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Exercise Science (EXSC)

CRN: 42194

In Person | Lecture/Lab

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Instructor: TBD

This course is designed to teach research methodology specific to the field of Exercise Science. Students are required to engage in hands-on research focused on an area of interest in the field of Exercise Science. Students will learn research skills, through locating primary literature sources, formulating a research question, conducting an original research study, and presenting it in several formats. Prerequisite: EXSC 211, 326, 332

2 Credits

FINC: Finance

430-01
Financial Intermediaries
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
D. Vang
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
35/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42709
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 42709

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  David Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

430-02
Financial Intermediaries
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
D. Vang
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
35/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42710
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
In Person

           

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 42710

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  David Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

440-01
Sec Analy & Portfolio Mgmt
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
S. Barabanov
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
35/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42711
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 42711

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Sergey Barabanov

This course will cover knowledge and develop skills necessary to carry out prudent and in-depth analysis of investments and create investment portfolio. The major topics covered include portfolio theory, macroeconomic analysis, industry analysis, financial statement analysis, company analysis, valuation models, creating investment policy statement, asset allocation, professional money management and portfolio strategies, and portfolio performance evaluation. The course also includes discussions of most recent developments in the investments industry. Students will apply course concepts to the analysis of actual companies and present their analysis and recommendations to investment professionals. Prerequisites: FINC 325, ECON 251, ECON 252 and 80 completed credits. Note: Students who receive credit for FINC 440 may not receive credit for FINC 445 or FINC 446

4 Credits

445-01
Investment Management I
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
M. Daugherty
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
14/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42713
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
SCH 322

         

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 42713

In Person | Lecture

Minneapolis: Schulze Hall 322

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Mary Daugherty

The focus of this course is gaining practical, hands-on investment management. This course is designed to cover the fundamental techniques of investments and portfolio management with significant attention to developing financial modeling skills. We will address different valuation techniques including comparable valuations and transaction analysis. In addition, we will cover macro-economic analysis, investment policy statements, industry analysis and specific company analysis to develop the skills needed to manage the portfolio. 4 credits. FINC 325; ACCT 200 or 215; 80 completed credits; and Permission of the Instructor. Note: Students who receive credit for FINC 445 may not receive credit for FINC 440. 

4 Credits

450-01
Int'l Financial Management
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Jaiswal-Dale
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
35/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42714
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 42714

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ameeta Jaiswal-Dale

The management of foreign and multinational financial operations. On the basis of international finance theory, students will learn foreign exchange risk management, foreign investment analysis, the financing of foreign operations, comparative accounting, international banking and international tax management. Prerequisites: FINC 324; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; ECON 251 and ECON 252; and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

480-01
Strategic Finance
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Baxamusa
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
32/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42715
4 Cr.
Size: 32
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 42715

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Mufaddal Baxamusa

Building on the finance theory learned in prior courses, this course focuses on financial strategies for a broad range of finance issues faced by corporations including capital budgeting, capital raising, optimal capital structure, dividend policy, and corporate restructuring and mergers and acquisitions. This is an applied, case-based course the students will be engaged in extensive case analysis, discussion, and presentations to develop and refine analytical skills. Prerequisites: FINC 324; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; ECON 251 and ECON 252; and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

HIST: History

400-01
Signature Work
 
T 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
K. Zimmerman
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
16/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41989
2 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
In Person

         

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 41989

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Kari Zimmerman

This course is intended to give History majors and those in related fields an opportunity to reflect on their academic career and plan for future career paths. Focusing on Historical fields, methods, and applied skills, students will synthesize the integrative experience of their HIST Major and liberal arts education. History faculty will discuss the opportunities and challenges in their respective fields as well as how these subfields address issues in the contemporary social, political, and economic landscapes students face upon graduation. With support from Career Services, students will also critically analyze Historical methods and their application to future paths as professionals and global citizens. Finally, class workshops will provide students with guidance and time to develop an interdisciplinary portfolio of work and accompanying integrative essay reflecting on the strengths of their History degree and liberal arts training at UST, which may provide the foundation for career and graduate school preparations. Prerequisites: Completion of at least two 300-level HIST courses and 80 completed credits, or permission of the instructor

2 Credits

JOUR: Journalism/Mass Comm

480-D01
Journalism and Media Ethics
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
Y. Feng
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
16/0/0
Lecture
CRN 40112
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Journalism/Mass Comm (JOUR)

CRN: 40112

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Yayu Feng

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront professionals in journalism and other fields of mass media, and their audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair.

4 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

365-D01
Leadership for Social Justice
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
AMCDFAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/0/0
Lecture
CRN 40760
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 40760

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

Leadership for Social Justice examines the arc of leadership through the process of creating, sustaining, then institutionalizing positive social change. The course examines models and case studies of authoritative, positional, influential and situational leadership in diverse settings such as community organizing, social movements, social entrepreneurship and nonprofit management. The course also explores approaches to ethical leadership and provides opportunities for students to develop the skills and vision needed to become ethical leaders for social justice. Students will analyze the role of leadership in the tensions between preserving order and promoting transformation. They will develop a critical approach to the dynamics of power in order to effect systemic change. Prerequisites: 80 completed credits

4 Credits

MGMT: Management

480-D01
Strategic Management
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Owens
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
35/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42748
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 42748

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Ernest Owens

This course examines organizational issues from an integrative perspective. It draws on concepts from the entire business curriculum to view the organization as a whole. The focus of the course is to have you view the organization from the perspective of the president, rather than that of a manager of a particular function (e.g., VP of marketing). It examines the development of core competence and a sustainable competitive advantage as part of an organization's strategic planning process. Prerequisite: OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; FINC 310 or FINC 321; MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; MKTG 200 or MKTG 300; BETH 300 or BETH 301; and CISC 200 or BUSN 202; and senior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 480 may not receive credit for MGMT 395.

4 Credits

MKTG: Marketing

430-D01
Marketing Management
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
J. Al-Khatib
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
24/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42807
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 42807

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Jamal Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

430-D02
Marketing Management
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
J. Al-Khatib
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
24/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42808
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 42808

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Jamal Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

MUSC: Music Classes (UG)

420-01
Senior Research Paper
 
TBD
TBD
Core 
TBD
10/0/0
Directed Study
CRN 40831
2 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Music Classes (UG) (MUSC)

CRN: 40831

In Person | Directed Study

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Instructor: TBD

This course allows music students to demonstrate research and writing skills by utilizing standard music resources (Music Index, RILM, Grove, Baker's, etc.). The paper may contain theoretical analysis, and/or it may be connected to the student's performance area or degree focus. Prerequisite: 80 credits completed; Seeking a BM or BA in music.

2 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

210-01
Chinese Philosophy
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Laumakis
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42427
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42427

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

An examination of the primary texts and problems that form the basis of Confucianism, Daoism, or Chinese Buddhism. Metaphysical and ethical themes will be considered. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-13
Sig.Work: Chinese Philosophy
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Laumakis
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42490
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42490

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41892
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41892

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability.  Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability.  This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course.   Some of the central questions examined in the course include:  What is disability?  Is disability merely a medical condition?  In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources?  Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse?  How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US?  What is the basis for human dignity?  What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities?  Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110

4 Credits

301-01
Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41802
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41802

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

230-02
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42431
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42431

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability.  Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability.  This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course.   Some of the central questions examined in the course include:  What is disability?  Is disability merely a medical condition?  In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources?  Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse?  How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US?  What is the basis for human dignity?  What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities?  Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110

4 Credits

301-02
Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42486
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42486

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

231-W01
Philosophies of Social Justice
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
T. Feeney
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42432
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
In Person

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
In Person

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
In Person

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42432

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is.  What makes a society just?  How is a just society ordered?  What does social justice look like up close?  If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so?  This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory.  One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why.  Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisite: PHIL 110

4 Credits

301-W03
Sig.Wk: Phil.of Social Justice
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
T. Feeney
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42485
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
In Person

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
In Person

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
In Person

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42485

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

234-01
Love, Sex, & Friendship
 
Online
C. Deavel
FASTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42433
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42433

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

This course examines the nature of human love, particularly within marriages and families. Possible topics include: romantic love, sex, dating, and marriage; true friends and friendships of selfish pleasure or advantage; love of family, strangers, and those one doesn’t like; the nature of love (is it a feeling? Is it an act of will?); reciprocity, permanence, and fidelity; love within families, especially spousal and parent/child bonds. Attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-04
Sig.Wk: Love,Sex,& Friendship
 
Online
C. Deavel
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42484
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42484

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

234-02
Love, Sex, & Friendship
 
Online
C. Deavel
FASTCore 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42434
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42434

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

This course examines the nature of human love, particularly within marriages and families. Possible topics include: romantic love, sex, dating, and marriage; true friends and friendships of selfish pleasure or advantage; love of family, strangers, and those one doesn’t like; the nature of love (is it a feeling? Is it an act of will?); reciprocity, permanence, and fidelity; love within families, especially spousal and parent/child bonds. Attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-05
Sig.Wk:Love,Sex,&Friendship
 
Online
C. Deavel
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42483
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42483

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

235-01
Politics, Law, and Common Good
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. Stuchlik
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41873
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
In Person

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
In Person

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
In Person

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41873

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-06
Sig.Wk:Politics,Law&CommonGood
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. Stuchlik
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41875
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
In Person

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
In Person

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
In Person

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41875

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

240-01
Faith and Doubt
 
Online
M. Lu
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41803
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41803

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mathew Lu

This course examines philosophical arguments for and against the existence of God and for the claim that the Christian faith, in particular, has been revealed by God; it also considers how faith, reason, and doubt are related. Possible questions include: Are there any good arguments for God’s existence? Does the evil in the world make it unlikely there is a God? Are faith and reason (including the findings of science) compatible? Could it be reasonable to believe in certain foundational Christian claims such as that Jesus is divine, that Jesus founded and gave authority to the church, and that the Bible is the word of God? Does the plurality of religions undermine the particular claims of any one of them? Can one make religious commitments in a state of doubt about the evidence? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-07
Sig.Work: Faith and Doubt
 
Online
M. Lu
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41804
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41804

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mathew Lu

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

254-01
Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41880
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41880

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

A philosophical investigation into ethical problems related to medicine and biotechnology, particularly those having to do with issues of special contemporary concern. Possible topics include: the right to healthcare and the just distribution of medical resources; professional-patient relationships and confidentiality; experimentation with human subjects; organ donation, genetic engineering; reproductive rights and abortion; cloning and stem cell research; euthanasia and physician assisted suicide; the ethics of triage and medical decision making; the funding of healthcare; the rights (including conscience rights) and responsibilities of medical professionals and patients; the prevention and control of epidemics. The course gives special attention to reflection on these topics from within Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 214.

4 Credits

301-09
Sig.Wk: Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42482
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42482

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

254-02
Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
H. Giebel
SMMNCore 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42435
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42435

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Sci, Med, Soc (SMDS) Minor

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

A philosophical investigation into ethical problems related to medicine and biotechnology, particularly those having to do with issues of special contemporary concern. Possible topics include: the right to healthcare and the just distribution of medical resources; professional-patient relationships and confidentiality; experimentation with human subjects; organ donation, genetic engineering; reproductive rights and abortion; cloning and stem cell research; euthanasia and physician assisted suicide; the ethics of triage and medical decision making; the funding of healthcare; the rights (including conscience rights) and responsibilities of medical professionals and patients; the prevention and control of epidemics. The course gives special attention to reflection on these topics from within Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 214.

4 Credits

301-10
Sig.Wk: Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
H. Giebel
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42481
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42481

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

255-01
Technology and Ethics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Winter
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41883
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 41883

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-11
Sig.Wk:Technology&Ethics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Winter
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42480
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42480

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

255-40
HNR: Technology and Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Winter
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42437
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42437

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-40
HNR Sig.Wk:Technology&Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Winter
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42479
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42479

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

265-01
Minds, Brains, and Computers
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
25/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42443
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42443

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Topics that may be covered include: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115.

4 Credits

301-12
Sig.Wk:Minds,Brains,&Computers
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
HonorCore 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42478
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42478

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

301-W12
Sig.Work: Political Philosophy
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
R. Lemmons
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
5/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42487
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42487

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rose Mary Lemmons

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

357-W01
Political Philosophy
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
R. Lemmons
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
20/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42446
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42446

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rose Mary Lemmons

A study of the nature and justification of political authority. Possible topics include natural rights, liberty and equality, the common good and its relation to the individual good, the place of liberty and equality, and the common good in justifying state action. Attention is given to both classical and contemporary authors. Prerequisite: PHIL 214, or PHIL 110 and one other PHIL course.

4 Credits

PSYC: Psychology (UG)

422-01
History of Psych in Context
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Bremner
EdTrnCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/0/0
Lecture
CRN 40486
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 40486

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Ryan Bremner

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

422-02
History of Psych in Context
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Johnson
EdTrnCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41258
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 41258

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

422-03
History of Psych in Context
 
MW 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Johnson
EdTrnCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/0/0
Lecture
CRN 42866
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

       

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 42866

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

SOCI: Sociology

480-W01
Seminar in Criminal Justice
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
J. Hodge
EdTrnCore 
09/04 - 12/20
20/0/0
Lecture
CRN 40597
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Sociology (SOCI)

CRN: 40597

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work
     Writing Intensive

  Jessica Hodge

The senior seminar serves as a capstone experience for students to address several central issues in the study of crime and justice. The major focus is to build upon students knowledge from previous courses with a focus upon an integration of knowledge from material learned throughout the major. Students will complete a final project that demonstrates an in-depth understanding of a criminal justice topic that could lead to future work in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite: SOCI 210 and 312 or permission of instructor

4 Credits

SOWK: Social Work (UG)

405-01
Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem I
 
R 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
C. O'Neal
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
8/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41078
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 41078

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Catrice O'Neal

Senior Fieldwork complements the student’s academic work through practical experiences in a social work agency, institution or department. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns social work tasks and functions while applying theory to actual social work situations. Students participate in an on-campus seminar with other senior social work majors while in placement. The placement is approximately 15-20 hours per week throughout two consecutive terms (fall and spring semesters). Concurrent registration in SOWK 401 is required. SOWK 405 is the fall course.

4 Credits

405-02
Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem I
 
F 9:35 am - 10:40 am
E. Solomonson
Core 
09/04 - 12/20
8/0/0
Lecture
CRN 41079
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/04 - 12/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

9:35 am
10:40 am
In Person

   

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 41079

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Eva Solomonson

Senior Fieldwork complements the student’s academic work through practical experiences in a social work agency, institution or department. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns social work tasks and functions while applying theory to actual social work situations. Students participate in an on-campus seminar with other senior social work majors while in placement. The placement is approximately 15-20 hours per week throughout two consecutive terms (fall and spring semesters). Concurrent registration in SOWK 401 is required. SOWK 405 is the fall course.

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

300-W01
Signature Work: God
 
TBD
TBD
Core 
TBD
4/0/0
Topics Lecture 18
CRN 41193
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 41193

In Person | Topics Lecture 18

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Open to all students, not only theology majors, the signature work in theology course is designed as a capstone experience to integrate a student’s entire college career, bringing fullness of expression to the University’s efforts through the liberal arts core to educate morally responsible leaders who, grounded in the Catholic intellectual tradition, think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good. There are two types of signature work in theology: signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges, or signature work that is focused on faith and the professions. Signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges will invite students to conduct research and/or experiential learning around matters of pressing concern according to the instructor’s discretion, such as fostering understanding across lines of religious difference; cultivating interfaith leadership; searching for beauty; establishing justice and peace; or responding to contemporary challenges such as environmental sustainability, immigration, or mass incarceration. Signature work that is focused on vocation may explore the integration of theology with a profession of the instructor’s choosing, such as the management professions, the legal professions, the medical professions, the public health professions, the psychological professions, or the engineering professions. Prerequisites: THEO 100 and a student must have at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

300-L02
SignatureWork:Nazism&Apartheid
 
Online
TBD
Core 
TBD
15/0/0
Topics Lecture 12
CRN 41431
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 41431

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 12

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

Instructor: TBD

Open to all students, not only theology majors, the signature work in theology course is designed as a capstone experience to integrate a student’s entire college career, bringing fullness of expression to the University’s efforts through the liberal arts core to educate morally responsible leaders who, grounded in the Catholic intellectual tradition, think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good. There are two types of signature work in theology: signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges, or signature work that is focused on faith and the professions. Signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges will invite students to conduct research and/or experiential learning around matters of pressing concern according to the instructor’s discretion, such as fostering understanding across lines of religious difference; cultivating interfaith leadership; searching for beauty; establishing justice and peace; or responding to contemporary challenges such as environmental sustainability, immigration, or mass incarceration. Signature work that is focused on vocation may explore the integration of theology with a profession of the instructor’s choosing, such as the management professions, the legal professions, the medical professions, the public health professions, the psychological professions, or the engineering professions. Prerequisites: THEO 100 and a student must have at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits


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