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CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

101-D03
The Search for Happiness
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Foote
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 22235
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
55S 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
55S 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
55S 207

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 22235

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing in the Discipline

  David Foote

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

4 Credits

205-01
Crisis and Development
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
R. Kennedy
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
25/26/0
Lecture
CRN 20839
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 20839

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

4 Credits

308-01
Sex, Gender, and Catholicism
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
B. Junker
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
25/23/0
Lecture
CRN 22236
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 22236

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

This course examines the topics of sex, gender, and Catholicism at various points of intersection. Drawing on a variety of Catholic and non-Catholic historical, philosophical, and literary lenses on these topics, this course gives special attention to under-represented voices, as well as to the teachings, practices, and institutional reality of the Catholic Church. Readings may cover topics such as friendship, sexuality, priestly ordination, marriage, erotic desire, parenthood, and more. Readings offer an opportunity to examine preconceptions, stereotypes, and assumptions surrounding these topics. Attention is also given to the exercise of power (including institutional power, and power based on gender), both historically and in contemporary culture. This course aims to deepen, diversify, and inform students’ imaginations on these topics and their connection to diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Prerequiste: CATH 101.

4 Credits

340-01
Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Kennedy
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
25/11/0
Lecture
CRN 21066
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 21066

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

4 Credits

396-01
Friendship
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
B. Junker
 
02/05 - 03/22
16/15/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 22237
2 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 03/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S B10

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S B10

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 22237

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10

  Billy Junker

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

2 Credits

489-01
Mary, Mother of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
E. Kidd
 
02/05 - 05/24
25/25/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 21550
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
55S 207

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 21550

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Erika Kidd

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

4 Credits

490-L01
Milton & 17th Cent Brit Lit
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
5/5/0
Lecture
CRN 22354
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 308

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 308

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 22354

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 308

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

A variety of British authors from the seventeenth century will provide a context for reading John Milton’s PARADISE LOST, the epic poem that tells the dual story of the fall of Satan from Heaven and the fall of Adam and Eve from Eden. This course is cross-listed with ENGL 362, with 15 seats on the ENGL side and five seats on the CATH side; students may register for either side of the course. This course satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, a Global Perspectives requirement, an early British Literature requirement for English majors, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and a Catholic Studies "Persons" elective. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

CSMA: Catholic Studies (Grad)

501-1
Cath Thought & Culture II
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
B. Junker
 
02/05 - 05/24
15/18/0
Lecture
CRN 21591
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
MCH 229

           

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 21591

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 229

  Billy Junker

This interdisciplinary course continues the exploration of the relations between faith and culture begun in Catholic Thought and Culture I, beginning with the medieval period up until the present day. Students will engage areas of artistic expression (literature, music, visual art) in the light of philosophical and theological currents affecting Catholic life in a given era. Upon completion of both Catholic Thought and Culture I and II, students will have some grasp on the fascinating interaction of Gospel and culture marking Catholicism's development, demonstrated skills in the interpretation of literature, music, and visual art, and an appreciation for how the arts can embody Catholic truth and goodness in beauty. Students will also have a broad sense of the contexts of the Catholic tradition, parts of which will then be filled in by other, more specific, courses in the program. NOTE: It is not required (though it is recommended) that students take CSMA 500 prior to taking CSMA 501.

3 Credits

501-2
Cath Thought & Culture II
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
B. Junker
 
02/05 - 05/24
11/13/0
Lecture
CRN 23047
3 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
MCH 229

           

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 23047

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 229

  Billy Junker

This interdisciplinary course continues the exploration of the relations between faith and culture begun in Catholic Thought and Culture I, beginning with the medieval period up until the present day. Students will engage areas of artistic expression (literature, music, visual art) in the light of philosophical and theological currents affecting Catholic life in a given era. Upon completion of both Catholic Thought and Culture I and II, students will have some grasp on the fascinating interaction of Gospel and culture marking Catholicism's development, demonstrated skills in the interpretation of literature, music, and visual art, and an appreciation for how the arts can embody Catholic truth and goodness in beauty. Students will also have a broad sense of the contexts of the Catholic tradition, parts of which will then be filled in by other, more specific, courses in the program. NOTE: It is not required (though it is recommended) that students take CSMA 500 prior to taking CSMA 501.

3 Credits

515-01
John Henry Newman
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
A. Litke
 
02/05 - 05/24
15/12/0
Lecture
CRN 22310
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22310

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Austin Dominic Litke

Called by the Church historian, Jaroslav Pelikan, “the most important theological thinker of modern times,” Cardinal Newman is perhaps best known for his work on university education. His most significant intellectual work, however, was in the area of development of doctrine, the relations of faith and reason, and the role of authority and conscience in the life of the Church. This course considers the contemporary relevance of Newman’s thought in each of these areas and examines his sermons and devotional writings, works which led T. S. Eliot to refer to Newman as one of the two greatest homilists in the English language.

3 Credits

517-01
Thomas Aquinas
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
A. Litke
 
02/05 - 05/24
15/11/0
Lecture
CRN 22694
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S B10

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22694

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10

  Austin Dominic Litke

In some regards the 13th century was a barbarous age, pre-scientific and sometimes superstitious, torn by conflicts and wars. At the same time it was an era of magnificent intellectual and cultural achievement, a time in which cathedrals were built and universities founded. St Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274) was a man of his time but his work, like that of many of his contemporaries, transcended his century. Today Thomas is remembered principally for his Summa theologiae, the textbook on theology that he wrote for beginning students and for his numerous careful commentaries on the work of Aristotle, the Greek philosopher. Even so, as important as the Summa is, about a third of Thomas’s extant work consists of commentaries on Scripture. Another major portion of his work, much neglected, consists of efforts to defend the teachings of Catholicism against its critics, both internal and external. The focus of this course will be to explore critical elements of Thomas’s thinking as a theologian in three general areas: systematic theology, biblical commentary, and apologetics.

3 Credits

522-1
Virtue 
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
J. Boyle
 
02/05 - 05/24
15/16/0
Lecture
CRN 23174
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 23174

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  John Boyle

Understanding virtue is essential for understanding and speaking about human activity. St. Thomas Aquinas will provide the foundational formulations of the theological virtues of faith, hope, and charity, and the cardinal virtues of prudence, justice, courage, and temperance. We will strive to see how understanding the virtues illuminates the fundamental reality of the human person and provides us with a vocabulary for analyzing and speaking about the moral actions of the human person. Works by other thinkers will complement readings from St. Thomas. We will also engage works of fiction. These will provide opportunities to consider the virtues in the concrete, and, in turn, the reality of the virtues will help us think more substantively about works of literature.

3 Credits

593-02
Vocation of the Catholic Leade
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
M. Naughton
 
02/05 - 05/24
15/17/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 22309
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

           

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22309

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Michael Naughton

The course explores two fundamental dimensions of our vocation and their integration. The first more personal dimension is the age-old relationship between the active and contemplative life. The first half of the course examines the fundamental claim that we will not get the active life or work right unless we get the contemplative life or leisure right. It contrasts this claim with the modern tendency to discount the contemplative life and leisure with the primacy of work, achievements, progress, and technological advancement. The second dimension is more institutional examining how we live out our vocation in the various institutions of our lives. The course addresses the hierarchy of institutions (what is primary and what is secondary) with a particular emphasis on work institutions and how they are understood and structure when one’s vocation is alive and vibrant. Topics covered in this section of the paper include organizational culture, just wages, job design, diversity, equity and inclusion, wealth distribution and poverty, technology and others.

3 Credits

593-1
Mary, Mother of God
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
E. Kidd
 
02/05 - 05/24
15/17/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 21595
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

         

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 21595

CoFlex:In Person&Online Sync | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207

  Erika Kidd

This course takes an interdisciplinary look at a central figure in Catholicism—Mary, Mother of God. Drawing on philosophy, theology, poetry, music, and the visual arts, the course examines three key moments in Mary’s life as mother: the Annunciation, the Nativity, and the Stabat Mater. These culturally and historically diverse depictions of Mary set the stage for an investigation into the meaning of her role, within Catholicism as a whole and within the lives of individual Christians.

3 Credits

DVDT: Dogmatic Theology (Div.)

503-01
Theological Anthropology
 
R 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
J. Musinguzi
 
02/07 - 05/24
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22447
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 105

     

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 22447

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Justas Musinguzi

This course examines the principles that inform a Catholic understanding of the human person including: the revealed truths of creation, sin, grace, justification, merit, and final glory. It also addresses questions regarding the relationship between natural and supernatural ends, and between the human person’s supernatural vocation and role in the world. Special attention is given to how such content informs lay pastoral leadership and effective ministry.

3 Credits

504-01
Christology
 
TF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
B. Stevenson
 
02/07 - 05/24
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 20290
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 20290

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Bill Stevenson

This course investigates the fundamental principles that govern the Catholic understanding of the person of Jesus Christ and his redemptive work. It considers the controversies and councils of the early Church, the thought of St. Thomas Aquinas, and contemporary theology. Prerequisite: DVDT 501; dual-degree students may substitute for DVDT 661.

3 Credits

505-01
Creation, Imago Dei & Orig Sin
 
TF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
C. Washburn
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20731
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 20731

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Christian Washburn

This course examines the origins and meaning of human existence from the perspectives of creation, original sin, grace, and redemption in Jesus Christ. The course focuses on the unity and dignity of the human person created in the image of God, the relationship between grace and freedom, and the relationship between each person's supernatural vocation and role in the world.

3 Credits

560-01
God and Revelation
 
T 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
B. Wanless
 
02/07 - 05/24
20/23/0
Lecture
CRN 22452
3 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 101

         

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 22452

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Brandon Wanless

This course is a general introduction to the Christian theology of God. It examines the claims and limits of natural theology as a foundation for understanding God’s self-revelation in Sacred Scripture, as well as the dogmatic development which illumines the meaning of both. Specific themes include theology proper, God the creator and the order of creation, trinitarian theology, Christology, and soteriology.

3 Credits

732-01
Rdgs Aquin: Sum Theo Prim Sec
 
MF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
B. Wanless
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/5/0
Lecture
CRN 22444
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 106

     

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 106

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 22444

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 106

  Brandon Wanless

The course will examine the method, thought, and personality of Aquinas as well as the historical context and contemporary relevance of his work. This course emphasizes careful reading of selected texts of the Prima secundae of the Summa Theologiae.

3 Credits

800-02
Theo & Hist of Synodality
 
MF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
C. Washburn
 
02/07 - 05/24
12/7/0
Lecture
CRN 22445
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 101

     

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 101

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 22445

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Christian Washburn

This course examines the theology and history of synodality. It will examine the theology of synods and councils, discussing their doctrinal and disciplinary authority in the Church. It will examine the use of synods and councils in the pastoral life of the Church. It will look at the various controversies over their authority, such as ultramontanism, conciliarism, and Gallicanism. It will also examine the different cultural expressions of synodality in the history of the Church. Finally, the course will look at contemporary attempts to recapture synodality in the Church, particularly in Rome and Germany.

3 Credits

800-03
Readings in Augustine
 
MF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
J. Froula
 
02/07 - 05/24
12/11/0
Lecture
CRN 22446
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 105

     

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 105

   

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 22446

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  John Froula

This course will focus on reading selected primary texts written by St. Augustine. Attention will be given to his claims, arguments, textual divisions, literary genres, target audiences, sources and influences. St. Augustine’s distinctive theological contribution will be appraised and seen in light of the broader Catholic theological tradition.

3 Credits

901-90
Continuous Enrollment/Research
 
See Instructor
K. Snyder
 
02/07 - 05/24
20/18/0
Dissertation/Thesis
CRN 20549
0 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Dogmatic Theology (Div.) (DVDT)

CRN: 20549

Dissertation/Thesis

St Paul: No Room

  Kenneth Snyder

0 Credits

DVHS: Historical Studies (Div.)

502-01
C.H. 2: Renaissance to Present
 
TR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
K. Snyder
 
02/07 - 05/24
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 20291
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

     

Subject: Historical Studies (Div.) (DVHS)

CRN: 20291

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19

  Kenneth Snyder

This course studies the history of Christianity from the fifteenth century to the present time. It surveys major events and developments, including the Protestant and Catholic reformations, Church/state relations in the eras of absolutism and revolution, the councils of Vatican I and Vatican II, and the complexity and diversity of global Christianity. Prerequisite: DVHS 501.

3 Credits

601-01
Patristics
 
M 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
K. Snyder
 
02/07 - 05/24
18/18/0
Lecture
CRN 22448
3 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 101

           

Subject: Historical Studies (Div.) (DVHS)

CRN: 22448

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Kenneth Snyder

This course introduces the literature and theological themes of the patristic period, from the first to the seventh centuries. The course emphasizes the reading and discussion of primary sources in translation. Themes may include the formation of Christian doctrine, the Church, spiritual life broadly construed, the interpretation of the Bible, the relation of faith and culture, and the emergence of a Christian consciousness of history.

3 Credits

605-01
Hist. of Religion in America
 
TF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
B. Carpenter
 
02/07 - 05/24
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 20424
3 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 101

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 101

   

Subject: Historical Studies (Div.) (DVHS)

CRN: 20424

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Bernard Carpenter

This course examines the development of prominent Protestant denominations and the Roman Catholic Church in the United States. Attention is also given to various religious experiments, divergent theological opinions, and other spiritual phenomena that have flourished in this country. Ecumenical and multicultural considerations include an examination of the experiences of various indigenous, ethnic, and racial groups that have significantly influenced the American religious landscape. Prerequisite: M.A.T. Students - one core course or permission of instructor; M.Div. Students - DVHS 502.

3 Credits

620-01
Hist Phil & Miss Cath School
 
TBD
A. Lessard
 
02/07 - 05/24
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 21491
3 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Historical Studies (Div.) (DVHS)

CRN: 21491

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Alex Lessard

This course introduces students to the origins and philosophical principles that have defined the mission and purpose of Western and Catholic education, both in approach and content, over the course of history from Classical Greece to present day United States. Reading the key texts that have shaped the course of educational history, students will investigate when and why Catholic education has diverged from modern philosophies of education. Additionally, the course examines the historic and current role of the Catholic school in society and within the Church through a careful reading and discussion of Church documents on education. Prerequisite: DVPT 575

3 Credits

DVLS: Language Studies (Div.)

521-01
Basic Ecclesiastical Latin II
 
MF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
F. Gallas
 
02/07 - 05/24
11/10/0
Lecture
CRN 21490
3 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 104

     

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 104

   

Subject: Language Studies (Div.) (DVLS)

CRN: 21490

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 104

  Fr. John Gallas

This course is a continuation of Basic Ecclesiastical Latin I. Students will learn more advanced principles of grammar and syntax, while continuing to develop the vocabulary necessary for praying in the language of the Church and for thoughtful engagement of her intellectual tradition in preparation for the Catholic priesthood.

3 Credits

800-01
Intmdt Ecclesiastical Latin II
 
MF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
B. Stevenson
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 22439
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

     

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

   

Subject: Language Studies (Div.) (DVLS)

CRN: 22439

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Bill Stevenson

This course is a continuation of Intermediate Ecclesiastical Latin I. Students will continue to study the Vulgate and Roman Catholic liturgical texts, even as they will read more advanced works in the Catholic theological and doctrinal tradition. In particular, students will be introduced to the great Latin writers of the patristic age, such as Tertullian, St. Augustine, and St. Leo the Great, as well as important works from the High Middle Ages, such as the Summa Theologiae of St. Thomas Aquinas.

3 Credits

DVMT: Moral Theology (Div.)

602-01
Fund Moral Theo & Cath Soc Tea
 
M 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
A. Hippler
 
02/07 - 05/24
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22453
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 105

           

Subject: Moral Theology (Div.) (DVMT)

CRN: 22453

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Arthur Hippler

This course introduces the fundamental principles of Catholic moral theology and Catholic social teaching. Special attention is given to the sources of morality, moral decision-making, the natural law tradition, and conscience formation. These elements form the basis for an overview of the major themes of Catholic social teaching as reflected in Sacred Scripture,papal encyclicals, and other church documents. Students will have an opportunity to apply their learning to selected issues that arise in the context of pastoral leadership.

3 Credits

610-01
Sexual Morality
 
TF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
J. Floeder
 
02/07 - 05/24
11/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20732
3 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

   

Subject: Moral Theology (Div.) (DVMT)

CRN: 20732

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  John Floeder

This course identifies and evaluates the Catholic theological principles that inform the Church’s engagement with sexual morality. Special attention is given to major documents and teaching instruments employed by the Church. The course also enables students to identify and apply ethical principles in the evaluation of human sexuality. Prerequisite: DVMT 601 or DVMT 602.

3 Credits

703-01
Biomedical Ethics
 
TF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
S. Rohlfs
 
02/07 - 05/24
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 20833
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
In Person

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
In Person

   

Subject: Moral Theology (Div.) (DVMT)

CRN: 20833

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Steven Rohlfs

This course presents essential Catholic theological principles that inform the Church’s teachings on issues of biomedical morality. Students examine the major documents relevant to the field and consider how to apply them in a pastorally effective manner. Prerequisite: DVMT 601 or DVMT 602.

3 Credits

DVPH: Philosophy (Div.)

306-01
Contemporary Philosophy
 
TR 10:00 am - 11:30 am
P. Rossotti
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20289
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 20289

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Pietro Rossotti

This course investigates several major schools of philosophy with the Western tradition from the 19th and 20th centuries and how they have impacted contemporary thought and culture. In particular, it considers the influence of romanticism, existentialism, postmodernism, neo-thomism, and phenomenology. It considers briefly the contours of analytic philosophy in contrast to continental philosophy.

3 Credits

800-01
Epistemology
 
MF 10:00 am - 11:30 am
E. Pedersen
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 21817
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

     

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 102

   

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 21817

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Erik Pedersen

This course treats epistemology within the larger context of both a phenomenology of the knowing subject and a psychology of the soul, especially as these are rooted in the philosophical tradition of metaphysical realism. The course focuses principally on the contributions of Aristotle and St. Thomas Aquinas to the question of the intellect’s relation to the order of being.

3 Credits

800-02
Ethics
 
MF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
S. Carter
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22435
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 104

     

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 104

   

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 22435

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 104

  Sarah Carter

This course provides an introductory survey of the foundations and methods of ethical reasoning in the philosophical tradition. Special attention will be given to the thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas and the ways in which ethical reasoning in the philosophical tradition is to be considered from the vantage of the Catholic doctrinal and moral tradition. This course is offered as preparation for the Catholic priesthood.

3 Credits

800-03
Philosophy of Nature
 
TR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
A. Grimes
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22436
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 104

 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 104

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 22436

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 104

  Andrew Grimes

This course examines the sensible beings of material reality—inanimate and animate—in their natures, their mutability, and their causes. Special attention will be given to the relation of matter and form, the categories of being, and the nature of change. Because sensible beings are more knowable to the human mind, this course is ordered towards preparing students for further philosophical studies in what is more knowable in itself in the study of Metaphysics and Natural Theology.

3 Credits

800-04
Medieval Philosophy
 
TR 10:00 am - 11:30 am
H. Giebel
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22437
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC LL19

 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC LL19

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 22437

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19

  Heidi Giebel

This course is an investigation of major philosophical questions in their medieval context. Special emphasis will be given to the philosophy of St. Thomas Aquinas. Possible topics include: the existence of God, the relation of faith and reason, free will and the providence of God, and the relation of political and ecclesiastical authority.

3 Credits

800-06
Natural Theology
 
TR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
M. Spencer
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22440
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

 

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 102

     

Subject: Philosophy (Div.) (DVPH)

CRN: 22440

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Mark Spencer

This course is a systematic treatment of philosophical arguments concerning the existence and attributes of God. Special attention will be given to the contributions of Aristotle and Aquinas to the questions regarding the nature and limits of the knowledge of God attainable by the light of unaided intellect.

3 Credits

DVPT: Pastoral Theology (Div.)

501-01
Teaching Parish I.B
 
R 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
M. Skluzacek
 
02/07 - 05/24
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 20292
1 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 20292

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Michael Skluzacek

This supervised ministry course provides first-year theology students with a greater understanding of the pastoral care given in a parish setting to the sick and those in need through ongoing participation in the Teaching Parish Program. By completing the tasks outlined in the Teaching Parish Program Manual for Theology I Spring Semester, seminarians gain valuable experience in the work of pastoral care that will be of benefit to future ministry. Prerequisitie: DVPT 500

1 Credits

509-01
Pastoral Min:Evan of Culture
 
T 1:15 pm - 3:15 pm
J. Michalak
 
02/07 - 05/24
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 20293
2 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:15 pm
3:15 pm
In Person

         

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 20293

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Joseph Michalak

This course provides an overview of the context of Roman Catholic ministry with special attention given to the organization and resources of the dioceses of students in the class. It entails grasping the meaning of evangelization, understanding the importance accorded by the Church to the impact of culture on ministry, and exploring how to become effective pastoral leaders in varied ministerial circumstances. Prerequisites: DVPT 513 and DVSP 501.

2 Credits

601-01
Teaching Parish II.B
 
M 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
M. Skluzacek
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20295
1 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
BEC 108

           

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 20295

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Michael Skluzacek

This course concentrates on the development of theological understanding of fundamental aspects of faith in both its dogmatic and sacramental expressions. Seminarians are introduced to the issues, processes, and structures involved in the faith development of adults and in effective methods of teaching the faith. Emphasis is given to the process of conversion and sound pastoral methods that facilitate conversion. Within the context of a supervised ministry experience, seminarians actively engage in the teaching parish’s RCIA program or other adult faith formation experiences. Prerequisite: DVPT 600

1 Credits

670-01
Applied Cath School Leadership
 
TBD
K. Ferdinandt
 
02/07 - 05/24
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 21492
1 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 21492

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Kevin Ferdinandt

In this course, each student is paired with an experienced Catholic school leader who will provide on-site mentorship to the student at a Catholic school throughout the academic year. This course allows students to apply the theoretical principles and strategies of Catholic school leadership presented in their coursework to real situations in the Catholic school in order to increase the effectiveness of their practice as a Catholic school leader. Students are able to gain valuable experience in the Catholic school and immediate support for this demanding role. Periodic online class meetings provide an opportunity for students to reflect on their experiences, challenges, and goals in light of the mentorship experience. Prerequisite: DVPT 575

1 Credits

730-01
Church Administration
 
R 8:15 am - 9:55 am
M. Van Sloun
 
02/07 - 05/24
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 20925
2 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

8:15 am
9:55 am
BEC 101

     

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 20925

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Michael Van Sloun

This course provides a basic understanding of the civil and canonical administration of the parish. Key topics include the proper stewardship of Church property and finances, personnel management, and administrative leadership. Resources are also provided that will support a priest’s continued formation in these areas. Prerequisite: DVPT 602.

2 Credits

754-01
Advanced Homiletics
 
See Details
F. Monshau
 
02/07 - 05/24
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 20834
2 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 105

1:15 pm
3:00 pm
BEC 105

   

1:15 pm
3:00 pm
BEC 105

   

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 20834

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Father Michael Monshau

This course expands on methods of preparation and delivery essential for homiletcs, focusing on the preaching that accompanies baptisms, weddings, and funerals. Attention is given to preaching with ecumenical sensitivity and special occasions such as times of communal crises.

2 Credits

790-01
Teaching Parish III.B
 
W 1:15 pm - 2:15 pm
M. Skluzacek
 
02/07 - 05/24
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 20374
1 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
BEC 105

       

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 20374

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Michael Skluzacek

This course provides seminarians with a broad examination of the liturgical and sacramental practices of the Church while developing the skills to celebrate the liturgy and sacraments. Seminarians learn how best to prepare themselves and others to participate in the sacraments with special emphasis given to the role of the deacon in the celebration of baptism, marriage, and funeral rites. Reflecting with his supervisor on the competencies expected of associates and pastors, the seminarian gains valuable experience in liturgical ministry. Prerequisite: DVPT 740

1 Credits

800-01
Crisis & Accompaniment
 
See Details
D. Crim
 
02/07 - 05/24
12/12/0
Lecture
CRN 22454
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 101

       

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 22454

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Derrick Crim, Amy Tadlock

This course offers formation in pastorally accompanying those in crisis. It will identify and analyze key points of trauma and offer practical skills in encountering and walking with those who are experiencing personal or spiritual alienation. The course will be taught in the context of the Catholic Church’s social teaching, the theology of grace, and the understanding of the Church as the Mystical Body of Christ.

3 Credits

982-01
M.Div. Intergrative Seminar
 
TR 10:00 am - 11:00 am
M. Skluzacek
 
02/07 - 05/24
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 20924
2 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

10:00 am
11:00 am
BEC 101

 

10:00 am
11:00 am
BEC 101

     

Subject: Pastoral Theology (Div.) (DVPT)

CRN: 20924

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

  Michael Skluzacek

The capstone seminar guides seminarians in a final review of their theological formation for future pastoral practice. The course utilizes case studies and assessment instruments to hone practical skills necessary for priestly ministry.

2 Credits

DVSS: Sacred Scripture (Div.)

521-01
Synoptic Gospels
 
MF 8:15 am - 9:45 am
P. Niskanen
 
02/07 - 05/24
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 20294
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

     

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC LL19

   

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 20294

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19

  Paul Niskanen

This course examines the Synoptic Gospels in light of the theological themes appropriate to each evangelist. It provides insight into each Gospel’s unique and complementary role in revealing the person of Jesus Christ. Issues related to hermeneutics and pastoral ministry are integrated into the exegetical study of the Synoptic Gospels. Prerequisite: DVSS 511 or DVSS 530.

3 Credits

705-01
Pauline Literature & Acts
 
MR 10:00 am - 11:30 am
J. Cavins
 
02/07 - 05/24
11/7/0
Lecture
CRN 20298
3 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
BEC 108

     

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 20298

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Jeff Cavins

This course explores the religious and cultural world of Paul and early Christianity as recorded in the Pauline corpus and the Acts of the Apostles. It studies Paul's major theological themes and his understanding of the life of first-century Christian communities. Finally, the course examines the impact of Paul’s teaching on modern Christian life and explores strategies for effective homily preparation using Pauline Literature. Prerequisite: DVSS 521 or DVSS 530.

3 Credits

705-02
Pauline Literature & Acts
 
W 6:15 pm - 9:15 pm
S. Hoffmann
 
02/07 - 05/24
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22450
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:15 pm
9:15 pm
BEC 105

       

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 22450

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Sr. Mary Micaela Hoffmann

This course explores the religious and cultural world of Paul and early Christianity as recorded in the Pauline corpus and the Acts of the Apostles. It studies Paul's major theological themes and his understanding of the life of first-century Christian communities. Finally, the course examines the impact of Paul’s teaching on modern Christian life and explores strategies for effective homily preparation using Pauline Literature. Prerequisite: DVSS 521 or DVSS 530.

3 Credits

740-01
Prophets
 
R 8:15 am - 11:15 am
S. Hoffmann
 
02/07 - 05/24
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 20835
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

8:15 am
11:15 am
BEC 105

     

Subject: Sacred Scripture (Div.) (DVSS)

CRN: 20835

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 105

  Sr. Mary Micaela Hoffmann

This course introduces students to the literary prophets and the role of prophetic traditions in Judeo-Christian thought. It surveys the Old Testament prophetic books in chronological order with emphasis on the prophetic vocation and canonical shaping of the prophetic corpus while using several interpretive methods. Prerequisites: for M.Div. - DVSS 511, DVSS 521; for MAT - DVSS 525 or 530.

3 Credits

DVST: Sacred Theology (Div.)

501-01
Intro Sacram & Worship
 
MR 10:00 am - 11:30 am
F. Monshau
 
02/07 - 05/24
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 20642
3 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

   

10:00 am
11:30 am
In Person

     

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 20642

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

  Father Michael Monshau

This course introduces the concepts and categories that form the basis for sacramental theology and liturgy. It considers these topics from biblical, historical, dogmatic, and ritual perspectives. The course provides the foundation for more extensive study of each of the sacraments in subsequent courses.

3 Credits

602-01
Sacrs of Initiation & Healing
 
MR 8:15 am - 9:45 am
F. Gallas
 
02/07 - 05/24
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20836
3 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

   

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 108

     

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 20836

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Fr. John Gallas

This course examines the sacraments of initiation and healing: Baptism, Confirmation, Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing of the Sick. It addresses the theological foundations and the pastoral implications of each of these sacraments. Prerequisite: DVST 601.

3 Credits

607-01
Theology of Holy Orders
 
R 1:15 pm - 3:15 pm
E. Koop
 
02/07 - 05/24
12/12/0
Lecture
CRN 20296
2 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

1:15 pm
3:15 pm
BEC 108

     

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 20296

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 108

  Evan Koop

This course studies the diaconal, presbyteral, and episcopal orders drawing on Scripture as well as patristic and ecclesiological sources. Attention is given to the relationship between the universal and ministerial priesthood, the sacramental configuration of the priest to Christ, and celibate chastity. It explores contemporary theological, ecumenical, and pastoral issues.

2 Credits

709-01
Liturgical Presidency I
 
See Details
S. Gideon
 
02/07 - 05/24
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 20297
2 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:15 pm
3:00 pm
BEC 102

   

3:15 pm
4:15 pm
BEC 102

     

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 20297

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Stephen Gideon, Elena Zolnick

This course develops the skills needed to prepare, implement, and evaluate the liturgical celebration of baptisms, weddings, funerals, blessings, the RCIA, and worship of the Eucharist outside of Mass. It prepares students to serve as deacons in the Eucharistic liturgy; and provides principles whereby liturgies may be adapted for pastoral necessity. Prerequisites: DVST 601 and DVST 602.

2 Credits

710-01
Liturgical Presidency II
 
See Details
S. Gideon
 
02/07 - 05/24
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 20299
2 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/07 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:45 am
BEC 101

1:15 pm
2:15 pm
BEC 102

         

Subject: Sacred Theology (Div.) (DVST)

CRN: 20299

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 101

St Paul: Brady Educational Center 102

  Stephen Gideon, Elena Zolnick

This course prepares seminarians to assume their role as presiders in the liturgical celebrations of Eucharist, Penance, and Anointing of the Sick. Through repeated practice sessions, the course equips students with the knowledge and skills needed to celebrate these sacraments. Prerequisite: DVST 709.

2 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

362-L01
Milton & 17th Cent Brit Lit
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
ENGL*Core 
02/05 - 05/24
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 21930
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 308

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 308

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21930

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 308

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Pre-1830 British Lit.
     Writing to learn

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

A variety of British authors from the seventeenth century will provide a context for reading John Milton’s PARADISE LOST, the epic poem that tells the dual story of the fall of Satan from Heaven and the fall of Adam and Eve from Eden. This course is cross-listed with CATH 490, with 15 seats on the ENGL side and five seats on the CATH side; students may register for either side of the course. This course satisfies an early British Literature requirement for English majors, an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, the Global Perspectives requirement, a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, and a Catholic Studies "Persons" elective. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

250-01
Intro to Justice & Peace
 
See Details
M. Klein
CoreFAPXSUST 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 20544
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 20544

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     Sustainability (SUST)

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein, Damon Shoholm

Major aspects of world and local conflict, theories of social science relating to conflict and violence, and various proposals for solutions. Among the aspects of conflict studied are cultural differences, scarcity of resources, economic and social structures, international trade, the arms race, corruption, oppression and war. Proposed solutions assessed include development, structural changes, world governance, multinational agencies, military power, civilian-based defense, active nonviolence for social change, conflict resolution, disarmament, cultural exchange, religious revival and prayer. These topics are considered in the light of theory, history, and literature. Students apply these concepts by investigating one country or geographic area in depth through a semester long research project. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W01
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/21/0
Lecture
CRN 20224
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 452

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 452

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 20224

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 452

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W02
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Finnegan
AMCDCore 
02/05 - 05/24
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22617
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 208

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 208

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 22617

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 208

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-03
Active Nonviolence
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Siggelkow
AMCDFAPXCore 
02/05 - 05/24
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 22619
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 454

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 454

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 22619

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Ry Siggelkow

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

296-01
Making Art for Social Justice
 
W 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
AMCDCGoodCore 
02/05 - 05/24
30/28/0
Lecture
CRN 22618
2 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 209

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 22618

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

Students will explore the intersections of art and social justice with a focus on visual arts and social movements in the Twin Cities. Topics of study will include public art, protest art, expression and censorship, issues of art access and accessibility, social movement theory, aesthetic theory, and the Twin Cities as a unique space for social practice art. The class will collaborate with Nikki McComb who uses art to push for social change. In 2016, she launched her #Enough campaign — an artistic effort to end gun violence in Minneapolis and surrounding areas through #ArtIsMyWeapon exhibitions and projects.

2 Credits

355-D01
Public Policy Analysis & Advoc
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
O. Okoi
AMCDFAPXCore 
02/05 - 05/24
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 20455
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 20455

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline

  Obasesam Okoi

In this class students will investigate how and why particular policies are developed, proposed, adopted, and implemented; will explore how social values shape and impact public policies; and will learn how to frame issues in ways that allow for more effective advocacy. The class will examine the relative power of diverse corporate and non-profit sectors in influencing policy debates and outcomes, including the role of think tanks. Students will analyze the limitations and strengths of diverse approaches to advocacy ranging from third-party appeals and solidarity efforts to elite decision makers, as well as the prospects for a politics of agency rooted in citizen-centered politics in which people mobilize to meet the needs of their communities. The course will integrate basic theory, interaction with public policy analysts and advocates, personal experience in persuasive advocacy, and case studies focused on issues such as climate change, economic inequality, land-food-hunger, and approaches to health care. Assignments will introduce students to various tools for persuasive advocacy and allow them to develop skill sets for using them.

4 Credits

375-D01
Conflict Analysis & Transform
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Finnegan
AMCDFAPXCore 
02/05 - 05/24
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 21203
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 207

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 207

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 21203

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

This course is an introduction to the issues surrounding social conflict. It centers on equipping students with the theory and skills of conflict analysis and processes of engaging in conflict on the global, local and interpersonal levels. It contrasts a traditional conflict resolution model with conflict transformation, a paradigm that appreciates how conflict and violence are connected to underlying issues of justice. The course introduces students to a wide range of conflict transformation processes such as negotiation, mediation, dialogue, facilitation, restorative justice and conflict advocacy. It provides students with the opportunities to participate in these processes and explore potential vocational paths in the field of conflict transformation. As a component of the practice of the skills taught in this course, students organize and lead the annual World Cafe, a university-wide interdisciplinary dialogue. Throughout, the course engages students in a process of rigorous reflection of the ethics involved in engaging conflict. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing

4 Credits

473-01
Vocational Seminar
 
M 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
O. Okoi
 
02/05 - 05/24
15/0/0
Lecture
CRN 20196
0 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:00 pm
JRC 222

           

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 20196

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

  Obasesam Okoi

Students are required to take this seminar during the semester they are doing an internship of 7-10 hrs/wk. The seminar meets three times (at the beginning, middle, and end of the semester), to provide opportunities for those engaged in individual placements to get peer support for their discernment process. At its core is a reflective process designed to lead students to: a deeper understanding of the practical means of working for social change; an evaluation of their internship experience (both in terms of gaining a deeper understanding of their own vocation and a better understanding of the type of institutions they are working with); and applying these insights to future course work and career planning.

0 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

110-01
The Person and the Good
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Clemenson
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/24/0
Lecture
CRN 21345
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 206

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 206

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21345

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  David Clemenson

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-02
The Person and the Good
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
J. Kronen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/28/0
Lecture
CRN 21321
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21321

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-04
The Person and the Good
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Kent
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/31/0
Lecture
CRN 21319
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 31
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21319

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Matthew Kent

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-05
The Person and the Good
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
E. Pedersen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 21115
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 309

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 309

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21115

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 309

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Erik Pedersen

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-06
The Person and the Good
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
E. Pedersen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 21116
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 309

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 309

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21116

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 309

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Erik Pedersen

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-07
The Person and the Good
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
E. Jerndal
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 21117
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 202

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 202

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21117

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Emma Jerndal

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-08
The Person and the Good
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
E. Jerndal
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 21118
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 202

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 202

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21118

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Emma Jerndal

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-09
The Person and the Good
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
T. Ketcher
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 21119
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 401

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 401

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21119

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 401

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Tim Ketcher

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-10
The Person and the Good
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
E. Pedersen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/28/0
Lecture
CRN 21120
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL01

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21120

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Erik Pedersen

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-12
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
J. Stuchlik
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 21122
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL01

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL01

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21122

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-13
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
S. Laumakis
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/28/0
Lecture
CRN 21123
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21123

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Human Well-Being
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-14
The Person and the Good
 
Online
C. Deavel
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 21276
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21276

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-15
The Person and the Good
 
Online
C. Deavel
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 21295
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21295

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Deavel

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-16
The Person and the Good
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/32/0
Lecture
CRN 21316
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 32
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21316

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-18
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
E. Pedersen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 21807
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 201

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 201

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21807

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Erik Pedersen

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-19
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. Kent
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/28/0
Lecture
CRN 21318
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21318

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Matthew Kent

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-20
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
M. Kent
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 22316
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22316

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Matthew Kent

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-21
The Person and the Good
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
J. Stuchlik
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 22317
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 204

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22317

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Stuchlik

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-22
The Person and the Good
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Jerndal
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 22318
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
KOC LL05

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
KOC LL05

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22318

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Koch Commons LL05

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Emma Jerndal

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-23
The Person and the Good
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
T. Ketcher
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/28/0
Lecture
CRN 22319
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22319

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Tim Ketcher

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-40
HNR: The Person and the Good
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Winter
HonorCore 
02/05 - 05/24
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 21808
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC LL01

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC LL01

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21808

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-W41
HNR: The Person and the Good
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
T. Feeney
CoreHonor 
02/05 - 05/24
20/21/0
Lecture
CRN 21809
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21809

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Honors Course
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-W42
HNR: The Person and the Good
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
S. Laumakis
CoreHonor 
02/05 - 05/24
20/21/0
Lecture
CRN 21810
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 201

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 201

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21810

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Honors Course
     FYE Human Well-Being
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

110-43
HNR: The Person and the Good
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Winter
HonorCore 
02/05 - 05/24
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 22590
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL01

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL01

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22590

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

Using philosophical methodology, and with substantial attention to Catholic intellectual tradition, this course enquires into the foundations of ethics, including how our conception of the human person affects our understanding of the moral life. It considers also the question of the rationality of belief in God and the difference (if any) God makes to our understanding of the person and the good. In addressing these topics, the course develops and applies basic logic skills, introduced as an essential part of philosophical method and an indispensable tool of critical thinking.

4 Credits

211-01
Buddhist Philosophy
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
S. Laumakis
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 22238
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22238

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

An examination of the history, primary texts, and philosophical problems that form the basis of Buddhist philosophy in India, China, Japan, and the West. Metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical themes will be considered. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

220-02
Logic
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
P. Distelzweig
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 22241
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 247

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 247

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 247

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22241

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

220-03
Logic
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
P. Distelzweig
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 22242
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 247

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 247

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 247

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22242

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 22244
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22244

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-01
Sig.Wk:Disability & Human Dig.
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
5/3/0
Lecture
CRN 22245
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22245

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This Signature Work section of Disability and Human Dignity is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

230-02
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 23031
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 23031

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability.  Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability.  This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course.   Some of the central questions examined in the course include:  What is disability?  Is disability merely a medical condition?  In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources?  Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse?  How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US?  What is the basis for human dignity?  What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities?  Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110

4 Credits

301-11
Sig.Wk:Disability & Human Dig.
 
Online
G. Frost
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
0/0/0
Lecture
CRN 23032
4 Cr.
Size: 0
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 23032

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

PHIL 301 is a signature work course in philosophy, open to all students.  Topics vary from section to section, but all sections focus on issues relevant to our university’s mission.  Various sections will, therefore, focus on questions concerning such things as the nature and dignity of human beings, what makes for a meaningful human life, the compatibility of faith and reason, what makes for a just society, or the application of ethical principles, to a variety of settings and professions, for the sake of the common good.  The course provides students the opportunity to reflect on and integrate knowledge acquired throughout their academic career, and to approach problems through multiple disciplinary lenses.  Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 and 80 credits completed

4 Credits

231-W01
Philosophies of Social Justice
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
T. Feeney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
19/21/0
Lecture
CRN 22246
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22246

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-W02
Sig.Wk: Phil of Social Justice
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
T. Feeney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
1/1/0
Lecture
CRN 22302
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22302

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This Signature Work section of Philosophies of Social Justice considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

231-W02
Philosophies of Social Justice
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
T. Feeney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
18/18/0
Lecture
CRN 22247
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22247

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-W03
SigWk: Phil of Social Justice
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
T. Feeney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
2/2/0
Lecture
CRN 22333
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22333

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

Action to achieve social justice depends, ultimately, on an understanding of what social justice is. What makes a society just? How is a just society ordered? What does social justice look like up close? If our society is not currently just, how may we justly make it so? This course considers competing (though sometimes overlapping) accounts of social justice that are of continuing relevance today, such as those found in the traditions of classical liberalism, socialism, Catholicism, and critical theory. One goal is to understand where such accounts agree, where they disagree, and why. Another goal is to appreciate how such traditions have animated and continue to animate the pursuit of justice, especially for marginalized persons in the United States. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

235-01
Politics, Law, and Common Good
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
29/26/0
Lecture
CRN 22248
4 Cr.
Size: 29
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 207

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 207

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22248

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

Who has the authority to make laws? What makes for good law? What is the connection between your earlier exploration in The Person and the Good, and these questions? What is justice? Can there be such a thing as private property? How are these ideas related to “the common good” that we keep hearing so much about? What notions of authority and justice have, in the real world, led to oppression and misery rather than human happiness? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on these topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-04
SigWk:PoliticsLaw & CommonGood
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
1/0/0
Lecture
CRN 22249
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 207

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 207

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22249

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

Who has the authority to make laws? What makes for good law? What is the connection between your earlier exploration in The Person and the Good, and these questions? What is justice? Can there be such a thing as private property? How are these ideas related to “the common good” that we keep hearing so much about? What notions of authority and justice have, in the real world, led to oppression and misery rather than human happiness? This course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on these topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

235-O2
Politics, Law, and Common Good
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
R. Lemmons
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
27/27/0
Lecture
CRN 22250
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22250

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Rose Mary Lemmons

Why have Americans, despite their polarizations and one civil war, been able to work together for most of their 250 year history? Does today’s polarization threaten the very existence of American democracy? What is American democracy? How does it function? Upon what view of justice and the common good does it depend? Is the rule of law important? Are unalienable rights important? Does it depend on a culture shaped on the values of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and its amendments, the U.S. Supreme Court or religious beliefs? What are the principles that work best to alleviate social ills especially poverty, discrimination, and abortion? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-05
SigWk:PoliticsLaw & CommonGood
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
R. Lemmons
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
3/2/0
Lecture
CRN 22251
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22251

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Rose Mary Lemmons

Why have Americans, despite their polarizations and one civil war, been able to work together for most of their 250 year history? Does today’s polarization threaten the very existence of American democracy? What is American democracy? How does it function? Upon what view of justice and the common good does it depend? Is the rule of law important? Are unalienable rights important? Does it depend on a culture shaped on the values of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution and its amendments, the U.S. Supreme Court or religious beliefs? What are the principles that work best to alleviate social ills especially poverty, discrimination, and abortion? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

241-01
Hist. & Philosophy of Medicine
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Distelzweig
BizSMMNCore 
02/05 - 05/24
18/17/0
Lecture
CRN 22252
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
NRH 1012

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
NRH 1012

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22252

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: North Residence Hall 1012

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Busn Healthcare Minor Approved
     Sci, Med, Soc (SMDS) Minor

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

Develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease, and health care. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-10
Sig Wk:HistoryPhil of Medicine
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Distelzweig
BizSMMNCore 
02/05 - 05/24
2/2/0
Lecture
CRN 22727
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
NRH 1012

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
NRH 1012

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22727

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: North Residence Hall 1012

Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Busn Healthcare Minor Approved
     Sci, Med, Soc (SMDS) Minor
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

Develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease, and health care. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

258-01
Environmental Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
FAPXCore 
02/05 - 05/24
27/27/0
Lecture
CRN 22253
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22253

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Who (or what) is worthy of our moral consideration? Should we care about the well-being of animals? Plants? Species? Ecosystems? If so, what should we do about it? Should we be willing to sacrifice human interests for the sake of the interests of other beings? What habits will we have to give up—or take on—to be responsible stewards of the environment? What difference might it make if we view the natural environment as God’s creation? What insights can we gain by considering approaches from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives? Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-06
Sig.Wk: Environmental Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
3/4/0
Lecture
CRN 22254
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22254

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Who (or what) is worthy of our moral consideration? Should we care about the well-being of animals? Plants? Species? Ecosystems? If so, what should we do about it? Should we be willing to sacrifice human interests for the sake of the interests of other beings? What habits will we have to give up—or take on—to be responsible stewards of the environment? What difference might it make if we view the natural environment as God’s creation? What insights can we gain by considering approaches from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

265-01
Minds, Brains, and Computers
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
27/26/0
Lecture
CRN 22257
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22257

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-07
SigWk: Minds,Brains,&Computers
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
3/2/0
Lecture
CRN 22332
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

       

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22332

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

This Signature Work section of Minds, Brains, and Computers is a philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

265-40
HNR:Minds, Brains, & Computers
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
HonorCore 
02/05 - 05/24
18/8/0
Lecture
CRN 22297
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22297

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisites: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197; and Honors.

4 Credits

301-40
HNR Sig.Wk: Minds,Brains&Comp
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Kronen
HonorCore 
02/05 - 05/24
2/2/0
Lecture
CRN 22331
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22331

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Signature Work

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

This Signature Work section of Honors: Minds, Brains, and Computers is a philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisites: Honors; and PHIL 110 or PHIL 197; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

301-D8
Sig.Work: Philosophy of God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
T. Pawl
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
4/4/0
Lecture
CRN 22266
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL62

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22266

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Tim Pawl

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. Prerequisites: PHIL 365; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

460-D1
Philosophy of God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
T. Pawl
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
12/11/0
Lecture
CRN 22265
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL62

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22265

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Tim Pawl

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

301-D9
Sig.Wk: Philosophy of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Rota
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
3/1/0
Lecture
CRN 22268
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 222

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 222

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22268

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. We will also briefly explore work from contemporary analytic philosophers on the fine-tuning argument, reformed epistemology, the problem of evil, and Pascal’s Wager. The mode of instruction will alternate between seminar-style discussion (on Tuesdays) and Socratic lecture (on Thursdays). Prerequisites: PHIL 365; and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course.

4 Credits

460-D2
Philosophy of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Rota
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22267
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 222

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 222

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22267

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. We will also briefly explore work from contemporary analytic philosophers on the fine-tuning argument, reformed epistemology, the problem of evil, and Pascal’s Wager. The mode of instruction will alternate between seminar-style discussion (on Tuesdays) and Socratic lecture (on Thursdays). Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

302-01
Ancient Philosophy
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
S. Heaney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
22/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22258
4 Cr.
Size: 22
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 401

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 401

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22258

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 401

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

In this course we will consider some of the central figures and questions of ancient (Western) philosophy. We will begin with some of the most important pre-Socratic philosophers, but the majority of the course will concentrate on Plato and Aristotle. Our main goal will be to gain a basic familiarity with the overall philosophical outlook of each of these two pillars of Western thought. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

302-02
Ancient Philosophy
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
22/21/0
Lecture
CRN 22259
4 Cr.
Size: 22
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL01

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL01

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22259

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

In this course we will consider some of the central figures and questions of ancient (Western) philosophy. We will begin with some of the most important pre-Socratic philosophers, but the majority of the course will concentrate on Plato and Aristotle. Our main goal will be to gain a basic familiarity with the overall philosophical outlook of each of these two pillars of Western thought. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

303-01
Medieval Philosophy
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
R. Lemmons
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 22260
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 204

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22260

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 204

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Rose Mary Lemmons

Why study medieval philosophy? Three reasons. First, the parochial complacency of medieval Europe was shattered by the exotic ideas of returning Crusaders and by the rediscovery of ancient arguments due to the influx of texts newly translated into medieval Latin. The result: intellectual life was unmoored and everything seemed uncertain---even Christianity. Questions about having a soul, being immortal, the reliability of religious belief, the goodness of marriage, the morality of private property, the existence of God as Creator, and even the possibility of certitude were burning questions affecting how people lived and died. These questions and the medieval answers are still relevant today. Second, Thomas Aquinas, the great synthesizer, argued that these questions had answers by utilizing the insights of his Greco-Latin, Muslim and Jewish predecessors. Third, the philosophical principles used by those medieval scholars who opposed Aquinas provided the vectors for the development of modern philosophy and the European Enlightenment. In sum: seeing the medieval clash of key arguments in action is both illuminating and helpful in understanding not only basic philosophical issues but also our own world. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

304-01
Modern Philosophy
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
D. Clemenson
 
02/05 - 05/24
20/8/0
Lecture
CRN 22261
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22261

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206

  David Clemenson

By the end of the early modern period (1600-1800), academic philosophers had largely rejected the Christian Aristotelianism of the medieval Scholastics in favor of the "Enlightenment" tradition of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz (the Continental Rationalists), Locke, Berkeley, and Hume (the British Empiricists), and Kant (whose "transcendental idealism" was an attempt to overcome certain basic shortcomings of Rationalist and Empiricist systems). Enlightenment philosophy's critique of a range of traditional beliefs concerning the human person and human knowledge has profoundly shaped contemporary society. Acquaintance with its main points is indispensable to a thorough understanding of modernity's achievements and defects. Prerequisites: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197; and one other PHIL course.

4 Credits

350-01
Ethics
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
M. Winter
 
02/05 - 05/24
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 22263
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 222

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 222

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 222

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22263

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222

  Michael Winter

An inquiry into the foundations and methods of moral philosophy. The course focuses on such questions as: Is moral knowledge possible? What is the good life for human beings? Are there objective moral truths? What makes an action right or wrong? Are some types of action always wrong? How does one become a good person? How does morality relate to God? What is morality’s relation to happiness? Special attention will be given to the Aristotelian-Thomistic tradition in conversation with other approaches such as Kantianism, Consequentialism, and Relativism. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

380-01
Epistemology
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. Stoltz
 
02/05 - 05/24
20/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22264
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22264

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01

  Jonathan Stoltz

I bet you are reading this description with the hope of coming to know what this course is about. But what is knowledge, and how would we know we have it if we did? This course examines fundamental questions pertaining to the nature of knowledge, belief, and justification. Defining knowledge is much more difficult than we might think initially. When are we justified in believing? What counts as proof? We look to thinkers in the classical and contemporary analytic tradition to get some insight into these and related questions. Prerequisite: PHIL 220.

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

100-W01
Foundations of Christianity
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Niskanen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21418
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 310

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 310

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21418

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 310

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

This section is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

4 Credits

100-01
Foundations: Christianities in
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
L. Potter
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 21449
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21449

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Laurel Potter

This course will introduce students to the theological framework that Christians have historically used to address questions of faith and human existence through the lens of contextual theology. Contextual theology emphasizes the importance of a believing community’s milieu—social, political, geographical, cultural, etc.—in understanding the priorities and contours of their faith and theological reflection. In this course, students will read Scripture and classic Christian texts with an eye to the authors’ and readers’ socio-political realities, as well as how critics and contemporary readers of these texts receive and understand these thinkers. The course will focus particularly on the development of Christian soteriology and anthropology over time and space, as well as the lived effects of different theological expressions for the common good

4 Credits

100-W02
Foundations of Christianity
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
P. Niskanen
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21223
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305I

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305I

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21223

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305I

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

This course introduces students to foundational concepts and skills associated with Christian theology. The course reflects critically upon the concepts of God and Christ, Scripture, Faith and Reason, the Human Being, and the Common Good, especially in the context of Catholic Intellectual Tradition and Catholic Social Teaching. Students will gain a basic level of theological literacy through introduction to central texts within Christian tradition, particularly the Bible. Students will also be introduced to connecting fundamental theological questions to the common good in the context of the pressing challenges of today’s world.

4 Credits

100-L02
Foundations: Bible & Communit
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
R. Dulkin
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
25/23/0
Lecture
CRN 21420
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 202

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 202

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 202

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21420

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing to learn

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Ryan Dulkin

This course introduces students to foundational concepts and skills associated with theology in the Hebrew Bible, Second Temple Judaism, early Christianity, and classical rabbinic Judaism, with reference to developments of these traditions into modernity. The course reflects critically on the concepts of Divinity (Biblical Monotheism, God and Christ in the Christian tradition, rabbinic Monotheism), Scripture, Faith and Reason, the Human Being, and the Common Good (with a focus on the Catholic intellectual tradition). The course emphasizes the production of sacred writings within the ancient communities under examination, and how those writings in turn shaped the communities descended from them.

4 Credits

100-02
Foundations of Christianity
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Gavrilyuk
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/28/0
Lecture
CRN 22340
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22340

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Gavrilyuk

This section is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

4 Credits

100-W03
Foundations: Care for Creation
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Twite
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21230
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 210

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 210

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21230

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Mary Twite

This course introduces students to foundational concepts and skills associated with Christian theology. The course reflects critically upon the concepts of God and Christ, Scripture, Faith and Reason, the Human Being, and the Common Good, especially in the context of Catholic Intellectual Tradition and Catholic Social Teaching. Students will gain a basic level of theological literacy through introduction to central texts within Christian tradition, particularly the Bible. Students will also be introduced to connecting fundamental theological questions to the common good in the context of the pressing challenges of today’s world.

4 Credits

100-03
Foundations of Christianity
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
P. Gavrilyuk
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
30/27/0
Lecture
CRN 22341
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 202

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 202

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22341

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Gavrilyuk

This section is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

4 Credits

100-L04
Foundations: Bible & Communit
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
R. Dulkin
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
25/26/0
Lecture
CRN 21224
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 247

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 247

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 247

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21224

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing to learn

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Ryan Dulkin

This course introduces students to foundational concepts and skills associated with Christian theology. The course reflects critically upon the concepts of God and Christ, Scripture, Faith and Reason, the Human Being, and the Common Good, especially in the context of Catholic Intellectual Tradition and Catholic Social Teaching. Students will gain a basic level of theological literacy through introduction to central texts within Christian tradition, particularly the Bible. Students will also be introduced to connecting fundamental theological questions to the common good in the context of the pressing challenges of today’s world.

4 Credits

100-L05
Foundations: Angels & Demons
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
B. Heidgerken
Core 
02/05 - 05/24
25/25/0
Lecture
CRN 21225
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
02/05 - 05/24
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 319

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 319

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21225

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 319

Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     Writing to learn

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Ben Heidgerken

This course introduces students to central Christian claims by examining biblical and theological texts involving non-human spirits. Students learn how these texts provide religious communities with resources to grapple with and perennially reimagine the divine, the natural world, and the common good in human communities. The course emphasizes the role of communal discernment and Spirit-led interpretation of biblical text as religious communities seek ways to make ancient texts ever new.

4 Credits