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GENG: English (Grad)

516-01
Lit of Racial Capitalism
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
K. Chowdhury
ENGL* 
01/30 - 05/19
14/9/0
Lecture
CRN 21497
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 481

       

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 21497

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 481
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Identity & Power

  Kanishka Chowdhury

Although the term “racial capitalism” has acquired fresh relevance in the last few years, the idea that, broadly speaking, race and class are co-constitutive, that they are inextricably connected to the way power relationships function within capitalist social formations is not a new one. What is perhaps “new” is that the categories of class and race have rubbed up against neoliberal developments that have moved scholarship to engage with a vast network of evolving imperial connections, where new forms of financialization, privatization, and labor exploitation have given rise to an emerging set of contradictions and conflicts. Thus, whether it is reproductive labor, environmental racism, state violence, or migrant work, the theoretical contours of racial capitalism allow us to examine these matters with an attention to their complex variations. In this class, we will be exploring three themes: Racial Capitalism: Theories and Counter-Theories; Racial Capitalism and Gender; and Racial Capitalism and Abolition Democracy. We will read works by Angela Davis, W.E.B. Du Bois, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, Nick Estes, Frantz Fanon, Claudia Jones, Mariame Kaba, Cedric Robinson, Walter Rodney, and Ruth Wilson Gilmore, among others. We will also read Colson Whitehead’s John Henry Days and watch Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep. Students will write weekly canvas posts and a short analytical essay, prepare a presentation on one of the assigned readings, and put together a research paper that will be a “work in progress” during the semester. This course satisfies the GENG 516 requirement for MA English students, as well as the Identity & Power requirement for all MA students. Prerequisite: GENG 513.

3 Credits

572-01
Hist of the English Language
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
J. Li
ENGL* 
01/30 - 05/19
14/12/0
Lecture
CRN 21957
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
OEC 203

           

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 21957

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Global Literature

  Juan Li

Why is the pronoun “she” the word of the millennium? How did English spelling become the “world’s most awesome mess”, as Mario Pei puts it? This course invites you to examine the dramatic and interesting ways in which the English language has changed over the past 1200 years - from a little known dialect spoken on a British Isle to a global language spoken by 500 million people around the world as their native tongue. We will study the stages of the “life” of English, beginning with Old English and continuing through Middle English, Early Modern English and into present-day English. We will consider both internal linguistic changes of the language as well as cultural and literary events that caused changes. In this process of investigating the language’s past, we will also reflect on its present and look ahead to its future. By the end of the term, you will gain proficiency in describing the evolution of the English language. You will also have opportunities to apply your knowledge of the history of English to your own areas of interest - literary historical studies, colonial and post-colonial studies, language studies, and the teaching of writing. No background in linguistics is required for this course. The only prerequisite is your enthusiasm in studying the changes of the English language. This course satisfies an elective credit.

3 Credits

573-01
Ways of Seeing: Lit & Visual
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
E. James
 
01/30 - 05/19
14/7/0
Lecture
CRN 21983
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 227

         

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 21983

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

  Emily James

In this course, we will explore the rich intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from a critical framework of readings about the visual, we will apply certain key terms and concepts--from ekphrasis to punctum--to graphic novels, photo-essays, and stories and novels about visual artists. As a class, we will practice close-reading both images and literary texts, collaboratively developing a set of analytical strategies and practices along the way. This course will also involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits.

3 Credits

603-01
Workshop on the Novel
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
H. Bouwman
 
01/30 - 05/19
12/11/0
Lecture
CRN 21958
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 401

     

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 21958

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 401
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

  Heather Bouwman

A workshop experience involving the ongoing exploration of subject matter and technique. Readings will include theoretical and creative texts. This course will also discuss fiction writing in publishing contexts -- how literary works are written, revised, submitted, acquired, edited, and marketed by presses. The course will also give students insight into broader issues in the publishing world such as the rise of small and independent presses, university presses, traditional major presses, as well as online publishing, self publishing, and issues of access and diversity in the literary marketplace. The course will include guest lectures or other engagements with agents and/or editors from the publishing community.

3 Credits


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