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CSMA: Catholic Studies (Grad)

501-1
Cath Thought & Culture II
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
B. Junker
 
01/30 - 05/19
15/16/0
Lecture
CRN 22382
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22382

CoFlex:In Person&Online Sync | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

  Billy Junker

This interdisciplinary course covers the periods of the Renaissance through the present day and continues the exploration of the relations between faith and culture begun in Catholic Thought and Culture I. We will engage select intellectual currents, political movements, historical developments, and modes of artistic expression as they affect and are affected by the broader Catholic tradition. Upon completion of both Catholic Thought and Culture I and II, students will have some grasp of the fascinating interaction of Gospel and culture marking Catholicism's development, demonstrated skills in the interpretation of literature and other art, and an appreciation for the continuity as well as the changes in Catholic thought and practice across time. Students will also have a broad sense of the contexts of the Catholic tradition, parts of which will then be filled in by other, more specific, courses in the program. NOTE: It is not required (though it is recommended) that students take CSMA 500 prior to taking CSMA 501.

3 Credits

510-1
Essentials of Cath Faith
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
J. Boyle
 
01/30 - 05/19
15/17/3
Lecture
CRN 22385
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

         

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22385

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

  John Boyle

In the effort to engage and understand the vitality and reality of Catholicism as it has influenced and shaped human thought and culture, we need to understand the common and unifying understanding of reality that is at the heart of Catholicism. This course is about the essential ideas that are so often implicit in the cultural expressions of Catholic life. It is something akin to learning a language in order to understand a culture; in this case, it is the language of doctrine to understand the thinking of the Church and the character of the cultures she informs.

To do this, we will read with some care the Catechism of the Catholic Church. To help us engage and reflect on faith in relation to Catholic thought and culture, we will read simultaneously with the Catechism one of the great novels of the twentieth century, Sigrid Undset’s Kristin Lavransdatter. The fundamental questions we will address are these: Does the language we learn in studying the Catechism, the language of the Church, help us to see and articulate what is going on in Kristin Lavransdatter? Do the particulars and circumstances of Kristin Lavransdatter help us think more deeply and precisely about the understanding of reality that is at the heart of the Church?

3 Credits

517-01
Thomas Aquinas
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
R. Kennedy
 
01/30 - 05/19
15/9/0
Lecture
CRN 22902
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S B10

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22902

CoFlex:In Person&Online Sync | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

  Robert Kennedy

In some regards the 13th century was a barbarous age, pre-scientific and sometimes superstitious, torn by conflicts and wars. At the same time it was an era of magnificent intellectual and cultural achievement, a time in which cathedrals were built and universities founded. St Thomas Aquinas (1224-1274) was a man of his time but his work, like that of many of his contemporaries, transcended his century. Today Thomas is remembered principally for his Summa theologiae, the textbook on theology that he wrote for beginning students and for his numerous careful commentaries on the work of Aristotle, the Greek philosopher. Even so, as important as the Summa is, about a third of Thomas’s extant work consists of commentaries on Scripture. Another major portion of his work, much neglected, consists of efforts to defend the teachings of Catholicism against its critics, both internal and external. The focus of this course will be to explore critical elements of Thomas’s thinking as a theologian in three general areas: systematic theology, biblical commentary, and apologetics.

3 Credits

529-1
Conscience, Freedom & Destiny
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
D. Foote
 
01/30 - 05/19
15/9/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 22383
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S B10

         

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22383

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

  David Foote

In the introduction to his book on the virtues, Romano Guardini writes: “There is one thing that Plato’s philosophy has made clear once and for all; he showed that absolute values exist, that these can be known and, therefore, that there is such a thing as truth. He likewise showed that these values are summed up in the majesty of that which we call “the Good”, which is identical with the divine and that its realization leads man to the perfection of life freedom and beauty.”

Such is the task of education – the formation of our vital powers and strivings, our inner world and outward surroundings. In short, it involves a formation and tuning of conscience within the antiphonal relation between nature and grace: to the Good, True, and Beautiful – the fabric from which nature is woven – and to Christ who wove it and who is our destiny.

To help us reflect upon this task, we will draw upon a range of Guardini’s writings, including Conscience; Freedom, Grace, & Destiny; selections from The World and the Person; The Lord; Learning the Virtues; The Church and the Catholic; and The Spirit of the Liturgy.

3 Credits

543-1
The Catholic Novel
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
R. MacKenzie
 
01/30 - 05/19
15/8/0
Lecture
CRN 22384
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22384

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

  Raymond MacKenzie

In this course, we will examine the interrelationships among the novelist, the novelist’s faith, and the audience. What does it mean to be a “Catholic novelist”? At what points are there conflicts between the demands of art and the demands of faith, and how may those conflicts be resolved? We’ll explore these and many related questions as we read the greatest Catholic writers of the modern era, including Dostoevsky, Mauriac, Greene, Waugh, and O’Connor.

3 Credits

593-1
Mary, Mother of God
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
E. Kidd
 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/2
Lecture
CRN 22386
3 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
55S 207

           

Subject: Catholic Studies (Grad) (CSMA)

CRN: 22386

Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

  Erika Kidd

This course takes an interdisciplinary look at a central figure in Catholicism—Mary, Mother of God. Drawing on philosophy, theology, poetry, music, and the visual arts, the course examines three key moments in Mary’s life as mother: the Annunciation, the Nativity, and the Stabat Mater. These culturally and historically diverse depictions of Mary set the stage for an investigation into the meaning of her role, within Catholicism as a whole and within the lives of individual Christians.

3 Credits


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