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GENG: English (Grad)

501-01
Intro Creative Writing & Publ
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
L. Miller
 
09/07 - 12/21
14/7/0
Lecture
CRN 42921
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 481

           

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 42921

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 481
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

  Leslie Miller

Introduction to Creative Writing and Publishing provides a primer to the expectations and conventions of graduate study in the field of creative writing, including creative writing pedagogy and practice, the running of a literary reading series, innovative forms of creative writing such as podcasting and interactive writing, as well as the study of the publishing world from the point of view of a writer, reader, and editor. Additionally, it will introduce students to the academic field of creative writing: its area of specialization, key issues, and forms of writing. How do writers orient themselves and their work in 21st century workshops? What are the tools that govern print design, interactive prose, or literary podcasts? What is the history of the publishing industry and how does that inform our present moment? This course is required for the Master of Arts in Creative Writing & Publishing and is an elective for the Master of Arts in English.

3 Credits

513-01
Intro to Grad Studies in ENGL
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Y. An
 
09/07 - 12/21
14/6/0
Lecture
CRN 42922
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 227

     

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 42922

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

  Young-ok An

This course provides an introduction to the expectations and conventions of graduate study, including research and writing methodology. In addition, it will introduce students to the field of English studies: its areas of specialization, key issues, and genres of writing. This course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the MA in English program.

3 Credits

577-01
Feminist Rhetorics
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
L. Wilkinson
ENGL* 
09/07 - 12/21
14/10/0
Lecture
CRN 42930
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 481

         

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 42930

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 481
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Identity & Power

  Liz Wilkinson

What a time to be reading rhetoric by women writers. Ketanji Brown Jackson, MMIW, TEEN VOGUE, THE HANDMAID'S TALE…. All, arguably, use rhetoric that attempts to alter constructs of a patriarchal society. This is not new. In this course, we’ll read varieties of feminist rhetorical theory and will read women’s writing through a rhetorical lens, gaining insight into how women have used writing to change the world, in their time and in ours. We'll gain factual knowledge of women writers and their work; gain a broader understanding and appreciation of the intellectual and cultural activity of women writers; and analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view. We’ll connect women’s writings thematically across space and time, considering the ways in which these texts lead to one another, speak to one another, contradict, coalesce, and inform (or not) our present zeitgeist. This course counts toward the Identity & Power requirement.

3 Credits

630-01
Neo/Victorian Literature
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
A. Easley
 
09/07 - 12/21
12/8/0
Lecture
CRN 42923
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
JRC 481

       

Subject: English (Grad) (GENG)

CRN: 42923

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 481
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

  Alexis Easley

This course explores how contemporary novelists appropriate the nineteenth century to address postmodern preoccupations with gender, sexuality, race, class, science, religion, imperialism, and consumerism. We will read some classic literary works – e.g., Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847) and Wilkie Collins’s The Woman in White (1860) – and then explore twentieth-and twenty-first century retellings of these narratives. For example, Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea (1966) retells Brontë’s novel from the perspective of Bertha Mason, the “madwoman in the attic,” and Sarah Waters’s Fingersmith reinvents Collins’s sensation novel as a lesbian love story. We will also examine selected film, television, and new media adaptations of classic texts and will situate course texts within the theoretical, social, and political contexts of the neo-Victorian enterprise. In exploring the trans-medial afterlives and reinventions of Victorian narratives, we will ask: What is Neo-Victorianism and why is it so ubiquitous in fiction, film, and popular culture of the twenty-first century? How do Victorian novels speak to their own historical moment and how do Neo-Victorian novels reimagine the past in ways that appeal to and challenge postmodern audiences? This is a hybrid course. We will meet three hours per week for ten weeks. The other four weeks will be dedicated to conferencing and independent research. This course fulfills the early literature requirement and counts as a 600-level course.

3 Credits


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