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GENG: English (Grad)

514-01
The Healing Art of Drama
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
A. Muse
02/01 - 05/21
14/6/0
Lecture
CRN 25056
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
Online

     

CRN: 25056

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

GENG: English (Grad)

  Amy Muse

Dramatic literature is our genre. Empathy, intimacy, and caregiving our subjects. Questions we’ll be asking include: how does the genre of drama lend itself to the development of empathy, of intimacy, of care? We will read theory from theater, theology, psychology, and sociology on catharsis, racial trauma, intimacy, and emotional labor, and a variety of plays by Sophocles, Antoinette Nwandu, Brittany K. Allen, Jeremy O. Harris, Quiara Alegría Hudes, and Martyna Majok. We will examine case studies of organizations using drama and theater for healing, such as Theater of War and Playback Theatre; and students will create individual research projects into uses of drama and theater for healing, e.g., racial healing, caregiving, medical school training, police reform, prison reform, mental health awareness, recovery from addiction, and community-building.

3 Credits

516- 01
Political & Civic Rhetoric
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
F. Sanchez
02/01 - 05/21
14/11/0
Lecture
CRN 25055
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
Online

         

CRN: 25055

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

GENG: English (Grad)

  Fernando Sanchez

In this course we will look at how rhetoric has historically shaped and continues to shape political discourse. We will consider such aspects of rhetoric broadly: speech, textual documents, performance, and technology. Questions of discussion will include - what constitutes an argument and how does our current political context impact what counts as argumentation; how do language and current tools and technologies shape the way that citizens are constructed; how are civic processes enacted in real-world settings; and how do citizens engage in tactical citizenship? This fulfills your GENG 516 requirement. GENG 513 pre-req or approval of the instructor.

3 Credits

560-01
The 21st Century Black Novel
 
M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
D. Lawrence
02/01 - 05/21
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 25089
3 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
Online

           

CRN: 25089

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

GENG: English (Grad)

  David Lawrence

In 1903, the greatest black intellectual of the twentieth century, W.E.B. Du Bois, wrote of America, “The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line.” Over a century later, black writers are still grappling with many of the same issues Du Bois so eloquently engaged in his seminal text, THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK. In this course we will think about what it means to be black in the twenty-first century by reading some of the most interesting and celebrated black novels published during the last twenty years. Authors will include: Colson Whitehead, Jesmyn Ward, Edwidge Danticat, Yaa Gyasi, Percival Everett, Danzy Senna, and Teju Cole.

3 Credits

604-01
Creative Nonfict: Art of Truth
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
M. Batt
02/01 - 05/21
12/13/0
Lecture
CRN 25057
3 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:00 pm
Online

       

CRN: 25057

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

GENG: English (Grad)

  Matthew Batt

Though the form of the essay dates back thousands of years, the notion of essays belonging more to the realm of creative writing and less that of rhetoric and oratory is still quite new—perhaps only 25 or so years old. Over the course of the semester, we will read from both essays and book-length works of creative nonfiction that represent some of the historic roots of the form, but mostly from diverse and contemporary writers working in the field today, such as Kiese Laymon, Roxane Gay, Alison Bechdel, and Ocean Vuong. We will also all write new work to be discussed by the whole class at least twice, once in a more conventional form of nonfiction such as a personal essay, another in a more contemporary, emerging form such as an immersion essay.

3 Credits


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