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Results

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ARTH: Art History (UG)

250-L01
Museum Studies: Collections
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
V. Rousseau
MsumCore 
09/08 - 12/22
13/13/0
Lecture
CRN 43819
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 414

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 414

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 43819

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Art History Museum Studies
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Vanessa Rousseau

In this course, museum successes and failures will be examined in relation to the broad topics of exhibition design, collecting, politics, tourism, museum organizational structures, architecture, and education. The course combines thematic and theoretical classroom discussions with practical and experiential museum components. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

4 Credits

250-L1A
Museum Studies: Collections
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
V. Rousseau
MsumCore 
09/08 - 12/22
12/12/0
Lecture
CRN 45246
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 414

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 414

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 45246

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Art History Museum Studies
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Vanessa Rousseau

In this course, museum successes and failures will be examined in relation to the broad topics of exhibition design, collecting, politics, tourism, museum organizational structures, architecture, and education. The course combines thematic and theoretical classroom discussions with practical and experiential museum components. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

4 Credits

330-01
Churches/Mosques 1st Millen
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
V. Rousseau
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 45249
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 414

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 414

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 45249

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Vanessa Rousseau

This course examines the formation and development of the first Christian and Islamic art and architecture during the first millennium C.E. of Europe and the Mediterranean. The class will examine the development of religious structures for these new religions, the role of visual images in both religious and secular contexts, and the influences that these cultures exerted on each other. Areas to be covered include: the Early Christian period; the Germanic, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian cultures of the sixth to eighth centuries; the Carolingian and Ottonian periods; Byzantine art and architecture; Islamic art and architecture.

4 Credits

330-1A
Churches/Mosques 1st Millen
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
V. Rousseau
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 45250
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 414

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 414

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 45250

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Vanessa Rousseau

This course examines the formation and development of the first Christian and Islamic art and architecture during the first millennium C.E. of Europe and the Mediterranean. The class will examine the development of religious structures for these new religions, the role of visual images in both religious and secular contexts, and the influences that these cultures exerted on each other. Areas to be covered include: the Early Christian period; the Germanic, Celtic, Anglo-Saxon, Scandinavian cultures of the sixth to eighth centuries; the Carolingian and Ottonian periods; Byzantine art and architecture; Islamic art and architecture.

4 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

205-01
Crisis and Development
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Kennedy
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
25/22/0
Lecture
CRN 43930
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 43930

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

4 Credits

301-01
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
B. Junker
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
25/24/0
Lecture
CRN 43205
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 43205

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

495-04
The Catholic Vision
 
6:00 am - 8:00 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
3/3/0
Independent Study
CRN 45743
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
             

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 45743

In Person | Independent Study

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

308-01
Sex, Gender, and Catholicism
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Deavel
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
21/20/0
Lecture
CRN 43090
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 210

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 210

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 210

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 43090

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Deavel

This course examines the topics of sex, gender, and Catholicism at various points of intersection. Drawing on a variety of Catholic and non-Catholic historical, philosophical, and literary lenses on these topics, this course gives special attention to under-represented voices, as well as to the teachings, practices, and institutional reality of the Catholic Church. Readings may cover topics such as friendship, sexuality, priestly ordination, marriage, erotic desire, parenthood, and more. Readings offer an opportunity to examine preconceptions, stereotypes, and assumptions surrounding these topics. Attention is also given to the exercise of power (including institutional power, and power based on gender), both historically and in contemporary culture. This course aims to deepen, diversify, and inform students’ imaginations on these topics and their connection to diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Prerequiste: CATH 101.

4 Credits

308-02
Sex, Gender, and Catholicism
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
B. Junker
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
25/9/0
Lecture
CRN 45526
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 306

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 306

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 45526

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 306
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

This course examines the topics of sex, gender, and Catholicism at various points of intersection. Drawing on a variety of Catholic and non-Catholic historical, philosophical, and literary lenses on these topics, this course gives special attention to under-represented voices, as well as to the teachings, practices, and institutional reality of the Catholic Church. Readings may cover topics such as friendship, sexuality, priestly ordination, marriage, erotic desire, parenthood, and more. Readings offer an opportunity to examine preconceptions, stereotypes, and assumptions surrounding these topics. Attention is also given to the exercise of power (including institutional power, and power based on gender), both historically and in contemporary culture. This course aims to deepen, diversify, and inform students’ imaginations on these topics and their connection to diversity, inclusion, and social justice. Prerequiste: CATH 101.

4 Credits

340-03
Vocation of the Entrepreneur
 
See Details
M. Schlag
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 44372
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 126

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 126

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 44372

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Martin Schlag, Michael Sarafolean

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

4 Credits

340-01
Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
R. Kennedy
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
17/15/0
Lecture
CRN 40237
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S B10

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S B10

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 40237

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

4 Credits

CLAS: Classical Civilization

225-W01
Classical Hero & Film
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Quartarone
CLASCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 40383
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 212

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 212

       

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 40383

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rina Quartarone

This Course focuses on analyzing and understanding Classical epic poetry, the ancient presentation of heroic figures and heroic exploits, and recognizing the influence of epic/heroic literature on the modern storytelling device of film. While the genre of epic is central to the course, other genres (both literary and cinematic) which present he-roic figures, e.g., tragedy, history, comedy, action, fantasy, will also be explored. Analyzing the works read or viewed via writing and class discussion will constitute the primary course activities; students will engage in reading, viewing and writing outside of class, while class time will include some writing, viewing and discussion. In order to allow am-ple time for discussion and analysis, the majority of films in their entirety will be viewed outside of class. The course grade will be based substantially on written analysis (i.e., essays, papers) of the texts and films studied. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

225-W1A
Classical Hero & Film
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Quartarone
CLASCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/7/0
Lecture
CRN 44227
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 212

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 212

       

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 44227

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rina Quartarone

This Course focuses on analyzing and understanding Classical epic poetry, the ancient presentation of heroic figures and heroic exploits, and recognizing the influence of epic/heroic literature on the modern storytelling device of film. While the genre of epic is central to the course, other genres (both literary and cinematic) which present he-roic figures, e.g., tragedy, history, comedy, action, fantasy, will also be explored. Analyzing the works read or viewed via writing and class discussion will constitute the primary course activities; students will engage in reading, viewing and writing outside of class, while class time will include some writing, viewing and discussion. In order to allow am-ple time for discussion and analysis, the majority of films in their entirety will be viewed outside of class. The course grade will be based substantially on written analysis (i.e., essays, papers) of the texts and films studied. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

245-01
Classical Mythology
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
L. Hepner
CLASCoreWMST 
09/08 - 12/22
7/7/0
Lecture
CRN 45342
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

   

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 45342

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Women's Studies Major Approved
     Women's Studies Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

245-01A
Classical Mythology
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
L. Hepner
CLASCoreWMST 
09/08 - 12/22
7/8/0
Lecture
CRN 45343
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

   

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 45343

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Women's Studies Major Approved
     Women's Studies Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

245-01B
Classical Mythology
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
L. Hepner
CLASCoreWMST 
09/08 - 12/22
6/4/0
Lecture
CRN 45344
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 414

   

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 45344

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Women's Studies Major Approved
     Women's Studies Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

COMM: Communication Studies

370-01
Intercultural Communication
 
Blended
A. Nuru
FAPXCoreWMST 
09/08 - 12/22
24/25/0
Lecture
CRN 44031
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 207

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 44031

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Women's Studies Major Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Audra Nuru

This course examines the influence of culture on our own and others’ communication. Students will be introduced to different aspects and levels of culture, including basic principles and theories that explain cultural differences on the group level, and challenges in intercultural communication, such as stereotypes, ethnocentrism, conflicting ethical standards, and racial disparities. Through lectures, discussions and first-hand practice, students are expected to form global perspectives and become more competent in intercultural communication. Students are advised to take the course either during or after the sophomore year.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

201-W01
The Play's the Thing: Drama
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 41343
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 454

     

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 454

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41343

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Get your ticket, merch, and concessions, because we'll be heading to the theater! This semester, we're going to experience family drama--well, read dramas that explore the various relationships inside and between families. We'll travel across the ocean (figuratively) to watch Shakespeare's Globe perform AS YOU LIKE IT. We will explore a classic play, Ibsen'sA DOLL'S HOUSE, rewritten by two modern authors, Lucas Hnath (A DOLL'S HOUSE, PART 2) and Heather Raffo (NOURA); the latter two plays have been performed recently at the Jungle and Guthrie Theater, so we will watch the scenes available from these local performances. Greek tragedy also obtains a modern rewrite in Sarah Ruhl's EURYDICE and August Wilson's FENCES. In our final play, Dominique Morisseau's PIPELINE, the threat of black juvenile incarceration meets the determination of a loving mother; Penumbra Theatre offered a stellar performance of this work. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

201-W02
Literature of the Strange
 
Blended
L. Miller
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41386
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 211

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online 1

       

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41386

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 211
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Leslie Miller

Mariane Moore's definition of good poems as "Imaginary Gardens with real toads in them" suggests that the relationship between the imagined and the real is not only fundamental to literary works, but often a shifting balance. In this course, we'll read poetry, drama, fiction and critical work that features calculated departures from straightforward realism, and examine why and how literary writers have pressured realism toward the fantastical and the surreal. Texts for the course may include works such as Carmen Maria Machado’s THE BODY AND OTHER STORIES; Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST; Laura Kasischke's SPACE IN CHAINS; Katherine Dunn’s GEEK LOVE; Mary Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN; Matthea Harvey’s IF THE TABLOIDS ARE TRUE, WHO ARE YOU; Toni Morrison’s SULA; as well as selected shorter works from Margaret Atwood, John Keats, Shirley Jackson, Wallace Stevens, and John Barthelme among others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W09
Native Amer Lit & Environment
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
L. Wilkinson
CoreSUST 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41379
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 309

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 309

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41379

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 309
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W9A
Native Amer Lit & Environment
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
L. Wilkinson
CoreSUST 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 44342
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 309

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 309

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44342

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 309
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W04
Reading Black Resistance
 
See Details
D. Lawrence
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
20/17/0
Lecture
CRN 41378
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41378

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Lawrence, David Williard

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement.

4 Credits

202-W05
Business & American Identity
 
Blended
D. Jones
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 44123
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 209

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online 1

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44123

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W5A
Business & American Identity
 
Blended
D. Jones
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 44186
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online 1

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 209

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44186

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W06
Business & American Identity
 
Blended
D. Jones
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 44124
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 211

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online 1

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44124

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 211
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W6A
Business & American Identity
 
Blended
D. Jones
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 44187
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online 1

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 211

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44187

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 211
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W07
Literature Looks at Medicine
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
B. Olson
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 44125
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 210

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 210

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44125

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Barbara Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W7A
Literature Looks at Medicine
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
B. Olson
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/8/0
Lecture
CRN 44329
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 210

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 210

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44329

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Barbara Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W08
Literature Looks at Medicine
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
B. Olson
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 44126
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44126

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Barbara Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W8A
Literature Looks at Medicine
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
B. Olson
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/8/0
Lecture
CRN 44339
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44339

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Barbara Olson

Hospitals, psychiatric wards, laboratories, operating tables, sick beds – all scenes presenting dilemmas of empathy and ethics for patients, doctors, and loved ones. We’ll read perspectives from both care givers and care needers: reflections from physicians on their craft as well as memoir, drama, and fiction about patients in the throes of illness. Writers may include Kopit, Taylor, Jamieson, Plath, Hawthorne, Edson, Pomerance, Fadiman, Williams, Gawande, and Mukherjee. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W10
Native Amer Lit & Environment
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
L. Wilkinson
CoreSUST 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41380
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 101

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 101

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41380

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 101
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W12
Native Amer Lit & Environment
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
L. Wilkinson
CoreSUST 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 44343
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 101

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 101

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44343

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 101
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W01
Wild Writing: Natural World
 
Online
G. Grice
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 44145
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44145

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gordon Grice

Since the days of Leonardo da Vinci, writers of natural history have straddled science and literature in their attempts to understand the world. We'll read and analyze the works of great naturalists and incorporate some of their strategies--empirical observation, reporting, academic research, memoir--into our own writing. Authors may include Italian biologist Francesco Redi; French naturalist Jean-Henri Fabre; U.S. poet Robert Frost; and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W02
Wild Writing: Natural World
 
Online
G. Grice
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 44146
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44146

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gordon Grice

Since the days of Leonardo da Vinci, writers of natural history have straddled science and literature in their attempts to understand the world. We'll read and analyze the works of great naturalists and incorporate some of their strategies--empirical observation, reporting, academic research, memoir--into our own writing. Authors may include Italian biologist Francesco Redi; French naturalist Jean-Henri Fabre; U.S. poet Robert Frost; and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W03
Existential America
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Phillips
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 44122
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 212

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 212

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 212

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44122

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Doug Phillips

In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Salinger's The CATCHER IN THE RYE, McCarthy's NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- to name but a possible few. In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W11
Literature of Mind and Brain
 
See Details
E. James
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 41385
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41385

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Emily James

This course explores literature’s relationship to the brain, the mind, and cognition. We will consider how writers and artists have registered, challenged, and even shaped developments in neuroscience and cognitive science across the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Topics may include sensation and perception, neurodiversity and neuroatypicality, affect theory, machine learning, neural networks, language acquisition, theory of mind, metaphor, and memory. Writers may include Virginia Woolf, Marcel Proust, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, Oliver Sacks, Jorge Luis Borges, Ian McEwan, Theresa Hak Kyung Cha, David Mitchell, Teju Cole, Ali Smith, Michael Davidson, and Naoki Higashida. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W01
Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
C. Hassel
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/12/0
Lecture
CRN 44129
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 227

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 227

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 227

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44129

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W02
Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
C. Hassel
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/11/0
Lecture
CRN 44130
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 227

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 227

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 227

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44130

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Hassel

How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Andy Weir's THE MARTIAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W03
The Road Not Taken
 
Blended
J. Hofmeister
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 41345
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 301

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 301

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41345

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 301
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jeannie Hofmeister

Drugs, alcohol, lies and deception. Why do some young adults wander down the wrong road? Robert Frost’s poem suggests that either road is “really about the same,” but is that truly the case? Young adults confront a wide variety of unique issues and challenges as they mature. The consequences of their self-destructive decisions often result in ruined lives. Possible texts may include: Selected works by Nathaniel Hawthorne and poetry by Robert Frost, EVERYTHING I NEVER TOLD YOU by Celeste Ng, ORDINARY GRACE by William Kent Krueger, A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT by Norman Maclean, and SIX DEGREES OF SEPARATION by John Guare. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

214-L01
American Authors I
 
Blended
A. Scheiber
AMCDENGL*Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 41381
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online 1

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online 1

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41381

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 206
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     English Early Literature Req.
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Andrew Scheiber

Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills both the Historical Perspectives and the Early American Literature requirements in the English major, the Historical Perspectives requirement for English with a Creative Writing Emphasis students, a literature course for English with a Professional Writing Emphasis students, and a requirement for students in the English with a Secondary Education major. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

4 Credits

220-L01
The Classical Tradition
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Muse
CLASCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 41359
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41359

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Muse

What might it mean to speak of “the classical tradition?” What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? From the ancient Greek gods in their serenity to the howls of the damned in Dante’s vision of the afterlife, whether mythological or theological, the works to be studied engage us in the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, including some interactions of the European traditions with ancient or medieval Asian, Mesopotamian, or Middle Eastern literatures. Authors may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Rumi, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major and the English with a Creative Writing Emphasis major, a literature requirement for students in the English with a Professional Writing Emphasis major, and a requirement for students in the English with a Secondary Education major. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement and a Global Perspectives requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204. 

4 Credits

220-L1A
The Classical Tradition
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Muse
CLASCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 44345
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 44345

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Muse

What might it mean to speak of “the classical tradition?” What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? From the ancient Greek gods in their serenity to the howls of the damned in Dante’s vision of the afterlife, whether mythological or theological, the works to be studied engage us in the most fundamental questions about what it means to be human. Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from ancient Greece to the Renaissance, including some interactions of the European traditions with ancient or medieval Asian, Mesopotamian, or Middle Eastern literatures. Authors may include Homer, Aeschylus, Sappho, Virgil, Dante, Rumi, Marie de France, and Christine de Pizan. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major and the English with a Creative Writing Emphasis major, a literature requirement for students in the English with a Professional Writing Emphasis major, and a requirement for students in the English with a Secondary Education major. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement and a Global Perspectives requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisites: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204. 

4 Credits

341-L01
African American Women's Lit
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
FAPXCoreWMST 
09/08 - 12/22
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 41383
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 454

     

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 454

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41383

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn
     Women's Studies Major Approved
     Women's Studies Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

At the start of her novel MAMA DAY, Gloria Naylor writes, "someone who didn't know how to ask wouldn't know how to listen." Audre Lorde, in "The Master's Tools Will Never Dismantle the Master's House," questions, "What does it mean when the tools of a racist patriarchy are used to examine the fruits of that same patriarchy? It means that only the most narrow perimeters of change are possible and allowable." Both writers call on their readers to approach African-American women's texts with humility, openness, and curiosity. They call upon readers to find new tools to dismantle racism, sexism, homophobia, and all the intersecting forms of racism that blight our lives. In this course, we will be "integrating" across communities and across time as we explore women's lived experience of the American racial and gender divide. We will be moving chronologically from the poetry of Gwendolyn Brooks during the Civil Rights era to the prose and poetry of Audre Lorde, where racial and second-wave feminist concerns intersect. We will study issues of black and mixed-race identity, questions of body image, and the painful realities of colorism in Toni Morrison's THE BLUEST EYE (1970), Gloria Naylor's MAMA DAY (1988), and Natasha Trethewey's MONUMENT (2018). The course will end with contemporary treatments of the economics, politics, and sociology of race intersecting with gender in Dominique Morisseau's THE DETROIT PROJECT and PIPELINE, Claudia Rankine's CITIZEN and THE WHITE CARD. This course satisfies the Diversity Literature requirement for English majors and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis students; a literature requirement for English with a Creative Writing students; the Human Diversity core requirement (old core); the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice core requirement (new core); and Integrations in the Humanities (new core). It also satisfies a major and minor requirement for the Women, Gender, & Sexuality Studies program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

4 Credits

364-L01
18th Century British Lit
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
ENGL*Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 41384
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 107

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 107

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 41384

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 107
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     English Early Literature Req.
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from British literature of the eighteenth century, the age of Englightenment and a time of exploration that launched industrialization, capitalism, the slave trade, imperialism, and the police force and prisons, as well as the vibrant new genres of the novel, biography, and the first comprehensive dictionary. Selected texts or authors (such as Behn, Defoe, Fielding, Pope, Haywood, and Austen) will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include bawdy dramas vs. elegant novels of manners, “secret histories” of disguise and mistaken identity, criminal biographies and moral philosophy, and how to choose a marriage partner. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences and an Early British Literature requirement in the English major and a literature requirement for students in the English with a Creative Writing and English with a Professional Writing Emphasis majors. In addition, it also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190 or ENGL 201-204.

4 Credits

366-L01
The Victorian Sensation Novel
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Easley
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 45265
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 302

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 302

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 45265

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 302
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Alexis Easley

The sensation novel was one of the most popular -- and controversial -- literary genres of the Victorian era. Whereas in the early part of the century crime was viewed as a threat posed by the lower classes, by the 1860s, criminal behavior was seen as the dark secret hidden beneath the façade of the perfect upper-class home. In this course, we will read Victorian page-turners by Wilkie Collins and Mary Braddon, as well as riveting twentieth-first-century adaptations of the genre written by Kate Summerscale and Sarah Waters. We will also read examples of Victorian journalism that inspired and responded to the sensation novel craze of the 1860s. This course satisfies the Contexts and Convergences requirement for English majors and counts as a literature course for English with a Creative Writing emphasis and English with a Professional Writing emphasis students. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

4 Credits

366-L1A
The Victorian Sensation Novel
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Easley
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/2/0
Lecture
CRN 45266
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 302

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 302

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 45266

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 302
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Alexis Easley

The sensation novel was one of the most popular -- and controversial -- literary genres of the Victorian era. Whereas in the early part of the century crime was viewed as a threat posed by the lower classes, by the 1860s, criminal behavior was seen as the dark secret hidden beneath the façade of the perfect upper-class home. In this course, we will read Victorian page-turners by Wilkie Collins and Mary Braddon, as well as riveting twentieth-first-century adaptations of the genre written by Kate Summerscale and Sarah Waters. We will also read examples of Victorian journalism that inspired and responded to the sensation novel craze of the 1860s. This course satisfies the Contexts and Convergences requirement for English majors and counts as a literature course for English with a Creative Writing emphasis and English with a Professional Writing emphasis students. It also satisfies an Integrations in the Humanities requirement for students under the new core program. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, or ENGL 201-204.

4 Credits

FILM: Film Studies

335-W01
Film Theory and Criticism
 
See Details
J. Morrison
FILMCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 44169
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 208

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 208

     

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 44169

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 208
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Film Studies Production/Pract
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Morrison

This course trains students in the use of a wide range of film theory and criticism as tools for interpreting film and media as texts, as narrative, as works of art, as historical artifacts, as political expression, as semiotic systems, as mediums of identity and social change, and more. Building on knowledge and skills learned in FILM 200 Introduction to Film, students will learn a range of compelling critical methods for the analysis of film and media, including many of the following: auteur theory; psychoanalysis; feminism, gender and masculinity studies; Marxism; cultural studies; queer theory; audience reception and star studies; postcolonialism; genre analysis; and race and ethnicity, among others. Film Theory and Criticism will help situate you as informed, critically engaged viewers of global film and media texts and practices. Each area of film criticism will be accompanied by a screening of a film or films that elucidate main points of the area of film theory that is the focus for that week. Through the combination of canonical theoretical approaches and more contemporary angles developed since the 1970s, this course will provide you with skills necessary to interpret films as collaborative art works, as technical artifacts, as sociocultural and ideological productions, and as products of a globalized media world. Prerequisite: Film 200 or instructor permission.

4 Credits

335-W1A
Film Theory and Criticism
 
See Details
J. Morrison
FILMCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/8/0
Lecture
CRN 44782
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 208

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 208

     

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 44782

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 208
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Film Studies Production/Pract
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Joshua Morrison

This course trains students in the use of a wide range of film theory and criticism as tools for interpreting film and media as texts, as narrative, as works of art, as historical artifacts, as political expression, as semiotic systems, as mediums of identity and social change, and more. Building on knowledge and skills learned in FILM 200 Introduction to Film, students will learn a range of compelling critical methods for the analysis of film and media, including many of the following: auteur theory; psychoanalysis; feminism, gender and masculinity studies; Marxism; cultural studies; queer theory; audience reception and star studies; postcolonialism; genre analysis; and race and ethnicity, among others. Film Theory and Criticism will help situate you as informed, critically engaged viewers of global film and media texts and practices. Each area of film criticism will be accompanied by a screening of a film or films that elucidate main points of the area of film theory that is the focus for that week. Through the combination of canonical theoretical approaches and more contemporary angles developed since the 1970s, this course will provide you with skills necessary to interpret films as collaborative art works, as technical artifacts, as sociocultural and ideological productions, and as products of a globalized media world. Prerequisite: Film 200 or instructor permission.

4 Credits

HIST: History

292-W02
Topics: Reading Black Resist
 
See Details
D. Williard
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
8/8/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 40216
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 40216

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Williard, David Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement.

4 Credits

HONR: Honors

480-01
HONORS Seeking Meaning
 
See Details
A. Finnegan
CGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
22/21/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 43659
2 Cr.
Size: 22
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 203

       

Subject: Honors (HONR)

CRN: 43659

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan, Christopher Michaelson

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

480-02
HONORS Art for Just Water
 
See Details
M. Klein
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/13/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 43660
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 310

       

Subject: Honors (HONR)

CRN: 43660

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 310
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein, Sandy Spieler

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

275-W01
Qualitative Methods
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 40519
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 208

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 208

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 40519

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 208
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

This course introduces students to qualitative research theories, methods, and techniques focused on representing voices of women, people of color, people in poverty and others that are marginalized or excluded from dominant culture. Specifically, students will gain familiarity with the qualitative social science methods of interviews, ethnography, documentary research, and focus groups. Throughout the course, students will be guided through the process of designing and conducting their own unique research projects meanwhile learning from ongoing research with their instructors and partner organizations. In addition to training in data collection techniques, analysis, and varied epistemologies, the course thoroughly explores the ethics of research with marginalized communities and the ways in which research can and does relate to social change. Together, participants in this course will co-create a teaching/learning community wherein we all critically analyze and respectfully value each person’s individual and particular contributions as well as our diverse understandings of social reality and how we position ourselves in the multiple worlds in which we live and work.

4 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

220-01
Logic
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
H. Giebel
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 42872
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 42872

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, first-order predicate calculus, - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. This course satisfies one of the core curriculum requirements in “Integrations in the Humanities.” Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

235-01
Politics, Law, and Common Good
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 44012
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 44012

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

Political philosophy and law are intimately connected to ethics, and to an underlying theory of the human person. Some say that political philosophy is an extension of ethics or morality; others hold that, without law, there is no morality. Which is it? Are human beings naturally political animals? From where does the authority to make law arise? What is the origin of property? What constitutes justice? What is the relation between a political system and the good of its individual citizens? What is this “common good” we keep hearing about? Are there better and worse forms of government? We will examine philosophical works on these topics from ancient to recent, with particular attention to the Catholic intellectual tradition. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

240-01
Faith and Doubt
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Spencer
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
30/23/0
Lecture
CRN 40442
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 40442

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

Many religions, including Christianity, ask people to have faith that God exists and has acted in human history. Yet it often seems more reasonable to doubt that religious claims are true. In this course, we will consider whether it can be reasonable to have faith in religious claims and how doubt can help a person come to a more mature faith. The course will be divided into two parts, each of which will address a source of religious doubt. In the first part, we will discuss the relation between faith, doubt, and science. In light of modern scientific findings (especially the theory of evolution), can it be reasonable to believe that God exists, created the world, and has intervened in history? In the second part, we will discuss the relation between faith, doubt, and suffering. In the face of widespread horrendous suffering and moral evil, can it be reasonable to believe that a good God exists and cares for human beings? Special attention will be paid to the suffering that results from the experience of finding the world to be ultimately meaningless. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

260-01
Global Philosophy of Religion
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
J. Kronen
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
30/5/0
Lecture
CRN 44010
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 44010

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  John Kronen

Many people today say they are “spiritual but not religious”, meaning that they reject organized religion, with its “dogmas” and doctrine of God as “an old man in the sky.” But the great religions of the world have engendered powerful philosophical theologies, offering sophisticated accounts of the ultimate, spiritual reality and of its relation to humans and to the world, developing these accounts in astonishingly rich ways. Some have argued that the ultimate reality must be personal i.e., must be a being who is able to act on purpose for reasons, and that a person need not be limited in any way. Some have argued that the ultimate reality must transcend personality, must be the ground of being which is not itself a being. Some have argued that the there can only be one uncreated being, while some have argued that the evil in the world requires that God, who is perfectly good and the creator of all good things, must be opposed by an uncreated spirit of evil which He will, nonetheless, defeat in the end. Some have argued that the ultimate good for humans must consist in loving union with a God of love and all other finite spirits, while others have held that it can only consist in a realization that one’s inner self is the very same as the Self of all, the Self which is Being-Consciousness-Bliss. Furthermore, the greatest philosophical theology humans have produced was not detached from religion or purported revelatory texts, but grew up, in an organic way, from a deep, and philosophically informed, meditation on them. This course explores Western and non-Western philosophical accounts of the nature of the ultimate reality and of the relation of humans to that reality and, by doing this, seeks to show that the currently popular distinction between “religion” and “spirituality” is based on nothing more than an ignorance of the profound, and varied, religious philosophies developed by thinkers who were adherents of the great world religions. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

265-40
HONR: Minds Brains & Computers
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
J. Stoltz
HonorCore 
09/08 - 12/22
20/17/0
Lecture
CRN 44014
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 201

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 201

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 44014

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jonathan Stoltz

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197, and HONORS.

4 Credits

298-01
Topics: Critical Thinking
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
M. Rota
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
30/8/0
Lecture
CRN 44182
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 208

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 208

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 208

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 44182

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 208
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Drawing on insights from philosophy as well as research from cognitive science, psychology, and behavioral economics, this course will help you learn to reason better. Emphasis will be on probabilistic reasoning rather than on deductive logic (which is the focus in PHIL 220). We will discuss in detail: how to avoid common natural biases in thinking, how to attain intellectual habits that promote the attainment of truth, how to create a visual representation of the structure of an argument, what evidence is and how to update one’s beliefs on the basis of new evidence, how to assess the quality of an information source, how to engage in probabilistic reasoning when certainty is elusive, and how to make good decisions when operating in conditions of uncertainty and risk. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

359-01
Philosophy of Law
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
R. Lemmons
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/7/0
Lecture
CRN 44015
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 305

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 305

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 305

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 44015

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 305
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rose Mary Lemmons

This course is structured as a seminar to promote the analysis and evaluation of key legal concepts and arguments in the philosophy of law. Topics include the ways in which law can compel action, justify the punishment of criminals, structure government, organize society, and promote--or harm--the common good. Other topics include the source, nature, and scope of law; unalienable rights; American natural law; the proper principles of legal interpretation and reasoning; and the legal challenges arising from cultural dissent, conscientious objection, and civil disobedience. Attention will be given to both classical and contemporary authors. Prerequisite: PHIL 214; or PHIL 110, PHIL 115, or PHIL 197, and one other PHIL course.

4 Credits

SPAN: Spanish

335-D01
Intro to Spanish Literature
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
I. Domingo Sancho
EdTrnCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 43762
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

     

Subject: Spanish (SPAN)

CRN: 43762

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Language/Culture

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Irene Domingo Sancho

An introduction to Spanish and Spanish American narrative, drama and poetry. Strongly recommended for students who minor in Spanish. The course is designed to teach students the skills of critical reading and literary analysis. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalent with a C- or better in each course.

4 Credits

335-D1A
Intro to Spanish Literature
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
I. Domingo Sancho
EdTrnCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 44512
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

     

Subject: Spanish (SPAN)

CRN: 44512

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Language/Culture

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Irene Domingo Sancho

An introduction to Spanish and Spanish American narrative, drama and poetry. Strongly recommended for students who minor in Spanish. The course is designed to teach students the skills of critical reading and literary analysis. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalent with a C- or better in each course.

4 Credits

STCM: Strategic Communication

244-W01
Research, Measurement, & Eval
 
See Details
X. Guan
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/6/0
Lecture
CRN 40520
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 319

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 319

     

Subject: Strategic Communication (STCM)

CRN: 40520

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 319
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Xiaowen Guan

This course introduces students with foundational research skills essential to strategic communication. Students will learn how to locate research, interpret research findings, and translate results into actionable strategy. Students will learn about different research methods and how to measure and evaluate public relations and advertising campaign effectiveness. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course after STCM111 and STCM234, or in the same semester of taking STCM234.

4 Credits

244-W1A
Research, Measurement, & Eval
 
See Details
X. Guan
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/1/0
Lecture
CRN 44482
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 319

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 319

     

Subject: Strategic Communication (STCM)

CRN: 44482

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 319
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Xiaowen Guan

This course introduces students with foundational research skills essential to strategic communication. Students will learn how to locate research, interpret research findings, and translate results into actionable strategy. Students will learn about different research methods and how to measure and evaluate public relations and advertising campaign effectiveness. Students are strongly encouraged to take this course after STCM111 and STCM234, or in the same semester of taking STCM234.

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

200-L03
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
D. Organ
CGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 40138
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 305

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 305

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40138

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 305
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Writing to learn

  Deborah Organ

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

223-L03
Belief: Ancient & Modern
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
D. Organ
CGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
9/9/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 40547
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 305

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 305

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40547

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 305
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Deborah Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

200-L01
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
D. Organ
CGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 42974
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 308

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 308

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 42974

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Writing to learn

  Deborah Organ

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

223-L01
Belief: Ancient & Modern
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
D. Organ
CGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 40550
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 308

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 308

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40550

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Deborah Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

205-W01
Old Testament
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
E. Gavrilyuk
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
14/13/0
Lecture
CRN 40531
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40531

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

An intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

221-W01
Bible: Old Testament
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
E. Gavrilyuk
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
6/5/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 40538
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 201

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40538

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

210-W03
New Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Yoakiem
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
12/11/0
Lecture
CRN 43434
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 101

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 101

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43434

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 101
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Medhat Yoakiem

This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

210-W3B
New Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Yoakiem
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
7/7/0
Lecture
CRN 45318
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 101

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 101

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45318

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 101
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Medhat Yoakiem

This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

221-W3A
Bible: New Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Yoakiem
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
2/2/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 45317
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 101

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 101

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45317

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 101
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Medhat Yoakiem

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

210-W04
New Testament
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Yoakiem
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
10/12/0
Lecture
CRN 43976
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 227

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 227

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43976

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Medhat Yoakiem

This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

221-W04
Bible: New Testament
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Yoakiem
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
8/8/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 40542
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 227

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 227

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40542

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Medhat Yoakiem

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

221-W4A
Bible: New Testament
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Yoakiem
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
2/2/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 45319
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 227

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 227

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45319

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Medhat Yoakiem

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

215-L02
Christian Morality
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
P. Wojda
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
9/7/0
Lecture
CRN 43935
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43935

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

  Paul Wojda

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

215-L2A
Christian Morality
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
P. Wojda
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
8/7/0
Lecture
CRN 45295
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45295

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

  Paul Wojda

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-L02
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
P. Wojda
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
4/3/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 44218
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44218

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

225-L2A
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
P. Wojda
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 45296
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 209

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45296

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

215-W04
Christian Morality
 
T 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Twite
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
9/9/0
Lecture
CRN 42924
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC 126

         

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 42924

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

  Mary Twite

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

215-W4A
Christian Morality
 
T 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Twite
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
9/9/0
Lecture
CRN 45299
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC 126

         

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45299

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

  Mary Twite

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-W03
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
T 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Twite
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
2/2/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 45297
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC 126

         

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45297

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mary Twite

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

215-L01
Christian Morality
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
B. Brady
FAPXCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
23/21/0
Lecture
CRN 43356
4 Cr.
Size: 23
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 202

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 202

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43356

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

  Bernard Brady

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-L01
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
B. Brady
FAPXCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
2/3/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 40554
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 202

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 202

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40554

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Bernard Brady

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

215-W01
HONORS: Christian Morality
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Twite
FAPXHonorSUSTCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41025
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 206

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 206

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 41025

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 206
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Honors Course
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

  Mary Twite

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

215-W1A
HONORS: Christian Morality
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Twite
FAPXHonorSUSTCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
6/5/0
Lecture
CRN 45293
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 206

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 206

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45293

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 206
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Honors Course
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

  Mary Twite

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-W05
HONORS: Faith & Ethics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Twite
FAPXHonorSUSTCGoodCore 
09/08 - 12/22
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 45400
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 206

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 206

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45400

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 206
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Honors Course
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mary Twite

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others.

4 Credits

215-L03
Christian Morality
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
R. Koerpel
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
21/18/0
Lecture
CRN 42925
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 204

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 42925

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

  Robert Koerpel

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-L03
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
R. Koerpel
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 44236
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 204

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44236

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

215-L04
Christian Morality
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Koerpel
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
10/8/0
Lecture
CRN 41239
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 41239

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

  Robert Koerpel

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-L04
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Koerpel
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
15/14/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 44238
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44238

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

220-L02
Early Christian Theology
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
16/17/0
Lecture
CRN 44577
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

10:55 am
12:00 pm
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44577

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Mark DelCogliano

A theological and historical introduction to the origins and development of the Christian church from the first to the fifth centuries. Special attention will be given to the historical emergence of Christian doctrines, creeds and canon; the formation of Christian understandings of the human person; the development of liturgical and sacramental traditions; and the interaction of Christianity with other ancient cultures. Contemporary approaches to the study of Christian origins will be emphasized.

4 Credits

220-L2A
Early Christian Theology
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
8/8/0
Lecture
CRN 45262
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

10:55 am
12:00 pm
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45262

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Mark DelCogliano

A theological and historical introduction to the origins and development of the Christian church from the first to the fifth centuries. Special attention will be given to the historical emergence of Christian doctrines, creeds and canon; the formation of Christian understandings of the human person; the development of liturgical and sacramental traditions; and the interaction of Christianity with other ancient cultures. Contemporary approaches to the study of Christian origins will be emphasized.

4 Credits

222-L02
History: Early Christian Theo
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 40568
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

10:55 am
12:00 pm
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40568

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

220-L03
Early Christian Theology
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
13/12/0
Lecture
CRN 44578
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

8:15 am
9:20 am
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44578

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Mark DelCogliano

A theological and historical introduction to the origins and development of the Christian church from the first to the fifth centuries. Special attention will be given to the historical emergence of Christian doctrines, creeds and canon; the formation of Christian understandings of the human person; the development of liturgical and sacramental traditions; and the interaction of Christianity with other ancient cultures. Contemporary approaches to the study of Christian origins will be emphasized.

4 Credits

220-L3A
Early Christian Theology
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
5/5/0
Lecture
CRN 45264
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

8:15 am
9:20 am
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 45264

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Mark DelCogliano

A theological and historical introduction to the origins and development of the Christian church from the first to the fifth centuries. Special attention will be given to the historical emergence of Christian doctrines, creeds and canon; the formation of Christian understandings of the human person; the development of liturgical and sacramental traditions; and the interaction of Christianity with other ancient cultures. Contemporary approaches to the study of Christian origins will be emphasized.

4 Credits

222-L03
History: Early Christian Theo
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
7/7/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 44575
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

8:15 am
9:20 am
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44575

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

220-L04
Early Christian Theology
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
14/14/0
Lecture
CRN 44579
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44579

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Mark DelCogliano

A theological and historical introduction to the origins and development of the Christian church from the first to the fifth centuries. Special attention will be given to the historical emergence of Christian doctrines, creeds and canon; the formation of Christian understandings of the human person; the development of liturgical and sacramental traditions; and the interaction of Christianity with other ancient cultures. Contemporary approaches to the study of Christian origins will be emphasized.

4 Credits

222-L04
History: Early Christian Theo
 
Blended
M. DelCogliano
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
12/12/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 44576
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
       

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 324

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44576

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 324
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

221-02
Bible: New Testament
 
T 6:00 pm - 9:30 pm
K. Kenney
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
20/16/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 44073
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

6:00 pm
9:30 pm
JRC 247

         

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44073

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kevin Kenney

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

222-L01
History: Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 40545
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40545

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

230-L02
Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core 
09/08 - 12/22
21/20/0
Lecture
CRN 41297
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 41297

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Steven McMichael

A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

224-01
Bridges: Theology & Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
9/9/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 40553
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 40553

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

4 Credits

300-01
SW: Theology and Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 12
CRN 44221
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
09/08 - 12/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 44221

In Person | Topics Lecture 12

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities AND Signature Work
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

433-01
Theology & Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
FAPXCore 
09/08 - 12/22
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 44220
4 Cr.
Size: 20