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ACCT: Accounting

410-02
Advanced Accounting
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Sathe
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 22039
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 233

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 233

     

Subject: Accounting (ACCT)

CRN: 22039

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 233
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Richard Sathe

The special accounting considerations of consolidated financial statements are considered in depth. Additional topics include foreign operations, partnerships, governments, and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and senior standing

4 Credits

730-201
Advanced Accounting
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Sathe
BIZ 
01/30 - 05/19
2/1/0
Lecture
CRN 22047
3 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 233

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 233

     

Subject: Accounting (ACCT)

CRN: 22047

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 233
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Part-time MBA

  Richard Sathe

This course explores the accounting issues and practices involved in business combinations, consolidations, partnerships, foreign operations, government and not-for-profit accounting. Official accounting pronouncements are discussed, as well as the related conceptual framework and theoretical issues. Prerequisite: ACCT 702.

3 Credits

410-01
Advanced Accounting
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Sathe
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
32/32/1
Lecture
CRN 22038
4 Cr.
Size: 32
Enrolled: 32
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 233

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 233

     

Subject: Accounting (ACCT)

CRN: 22038

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 233
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Richard Sathe

The special accounting considerations of consolidated financial statements are considered in depth. Additional topics include foreign operations, partnerships, governments, and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and senior standing

4 Credits

ARTH: Art History (UG)

202-L02
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/31
Lecture
CRN 21914
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 31
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 311

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 21914

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 311
     (Common Good capacity: 31 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

301-01
Signature Work: Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22713
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 22713

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

ARTH 301 is a signature work course in art history.  Topics vary from section to section, but all art history Signature Work courses focus on interdisciplinary perspectives in the field of art history, the integration of learning, and the relevance of our work as art historians to the university’s mission. The various sections focus on an gaining an understanding of art through a careful exploration of the historical, social, and cultural context of its production. This course calls upon students to reflect on knowledge they have built throughout their academic careers and to explore and integrate their learning in an interdisciplinary fashion. Prerequisites: 4 credits in ARTH coursework and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course

4 Credits

BCOM: Business Communication

435-D01
Mgmt Priorities and BCOM
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Porter
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
28/14/0
Lecture
CRN 22048
4 Cr.
Size: 28
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 229

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 229

       

Subject: Business Communication (BCOM)

CRN: 22048

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 229
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Michael Porter

This course is designed to develop greater insight into the relationship between communicators and management and leadership. By understanding the mindset of senior leaders and managers through a series of texts, case histories, articles, and classroom discussion, students will develop an understanding of the many variables and considerations linking communication strategy to organizational in decision making. In addition to understanding the mindset and priorities of senior leadership and management, students will learn and review a variety of communications strategies and tactics that can be employed to best meet the unique needs of a situation and thereby effectively contribute to communication necessary to organizational success, as seen by senior level leadership. Prerequisite: Senior standing, MKTG 201 & 320, plus one JOUR/DIMA/STCM 2XX or higher 

4 Credits

BIOL: Biology

328-01
Envr. Toxicology & Health
 
See Details
D. Martinovic
BLABSUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
34/34/0
Lecture
CRN 20660
4 Cr.
Size: 34
Enrolled: 34
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OWS 251

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OWS 251

     

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 20660

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Owens Science Hall 251
     (Common Good capacity: 52 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Biology Lab Elective
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Signature Work

  Dalma Martinovic, Jennifer Illig

There is increasing public interest and concern over the connections between environmental quality and human health. This course will explore these connections by providing an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of environmental toxicology- the study of the adverse effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents in the environment on living organisms, including humans. Topics will cover global and local problems including issues of environmental justice and future approaches to sustainably mitigate the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: (BIOL 101 OR 102 OR 105 OR 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209) OR ESCI 310 OR PUBH 300 OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 368 OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 361 OR Completion or co-enrollment in CISC 260 OR CISC 360 OR STAT 320 OR STAT 333 OR ECON 315 OR Permission of the instructor. Students must have 80 completed credits to enroll.

4 Credits

328-51
Envr.Toxicology and Health/Lab
 
Blended
D. Martinovic
BLABSUSTCore 
TBD
11/10/0
Lab
CRN 20661
0 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

02/01:
8:00 am
12:00 pm
OWS 379

02/08:
NA
NA
Online

02/15:
8:00 am
12:00 pm
OWS 379

02/22:
NA
NA
Online

03/01:
8:00 am
12:00 pm
OWS 379

03/08:
NA
NA
Online

03/15:
8:00 am
12:00 pm
OWS 379

03/29:
NA
NA
Online

04/12:
8:00 am
12:00 pm
OWS 379

04/19:
NA
NA
Online

04/26:
8:00 am
12:00 pm
OWS 379

05/03:
NA
NA
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 20661

Blended Online & In-Person | Lab

St Paul: Owens Science Hall 379
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

Requirements Met:
     Biology Lab Elective
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Signature Work

  Dalma Martinovic, Jennifer Illig

There is increasing public interest and concern over the connections between environmental quality and human health. This course will explore these connections by providing an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of environmental toxicology- the study of the adverse effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents in the environment on living organisms, including humans. Topics will cover global and local problems including issues of environmental justice and future approaches to sustainably mitigate the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: (BIOL 101 OR 102 OR 105 OR 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209) OR ESCI 310 OR PUBH 300   OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 368 OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 361 OR Completion or co-enrollment in CISC 260 OR CISC 360 OR STAT 320 OR STAT 333 OR ECON 315 OR Permission of the instructor plus 80 completed credits.

0 Credits

328-52
Envr.Toxicology and Health/Lab
 
Blended
D. Martinovic
BLABSUSTCore 
TBD
12/12/0
Lab
CRN 20664
0 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

02/01:
1:35 pm
5:35 pm
OWS 379

02/08:
NA
NA
Online

02/15:
1:35 pm
5:35 pm
OWS 379

02/22:
NA
NA
Online

03/01:
1:35 pm
5:35 pm
OWS 379

03/08:
NA
NA
Online

03/15:
1:35 pm
5:35 pm
OWS 379

03/29:
NA
NA
Online

04/12:
1:35 pm
5:35 pm
OWS 379

04/19:
NA
NA
Online

04/26:
1:35 pm
5:35 pm
OWS 379

05/03:
NA
NA
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 20664

Blended Online & In-Person | Lab

St Paul: Owens Science Hall 379
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

Requirements Met:
     Biology Lab Elective
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Signature Work

  Dalma Martinovic, Jennifer Illig

There is increasing public interest and concern over the connections between environmental quality and human health. This course will explore these connections by providing an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of environmental toxicology- the study of the adverse effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents in the environment on living organisms, including humans. Topics will cover global and local problems including issues of environmental justice and future approaches to sustainably mitigate the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: (BIOL 101 OR 102 OR 105 OR 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209) OR ESCI 310 OR PUBH 300   OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 368 OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 361 OR Completion or co-enrollment in CISC 260 OR CISC 360 OR STAT 320 OR STAT 333 OR ECON 315 OR Permission of the instructor plus 80 completed credits.

0 Credits

328-53
Envr.Toxicology and Health/Lab
 
Blended
D. Martinovic
BLABSUSTCore 
TBD
11/12/0
Lab
CRN 21778
0 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

02/02:
1:30 pm
5:30 pm
OWS 379

02/09:
NA
NA
Online

02/16:
1:30 pm
5:30 pm
OWS 379

02/23:
NA
NA
Online

03/02:
1:30 pm
5:30 pm
OWS 379

03/09:
NA
NA
Online

03/16:
1:30 pm
5:30 pm
OWS 379

03/30:
NA
NA
Online

04/13:
1:30 pm
5:30 pm
OWS 379

04/20:
NA
NA
Online

04/27:
1:30 pm
5:30 pm
OWS 379

05/04:
NA
NA
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 21778

Blended Online & In-Person | Lab

St Paul: Owens Science Hall 379
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

Requirements Met:
     Biology Lab Elective
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Signature Work

  Dalma Martinovic, Jennifer Illig

There is increasing public interest and concern over the connections between environmental quality and human health. This course will explore these connections by providing an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of environmental toxicology- the study of the adverse effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents in the environment on living organisms, including humans. Topics will cover global and local problems including issues of environmental justice and future approaches to sustainably mitigate the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: (BIOL 101 OR 102 OR 105 OR 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209) OR ESCI 310 OR PUBH 300   OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 368 OR Completion or co-enrollment in ENGR 361 OR Completion or co-enrollment in CISC 260 OR CISC 360 OR STAT 320 OR STAT 333 OR ECON 315 OR Permission of the instructor plus 80 completed credits.

0 Credits

484-01
Complex Issues in Human Health
 
Blended
J. Illig
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 03/17
18/18/0
Lecture
CRN 22581
2 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 03/17
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OSS LL18

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 22581

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall LL18
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Online

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Jennifer Illig

Investigation of selected problems in biology at an advanced level, involving student presentations based on the primary literature. The subject will vary and will be announced in the annual Class Schedule. These courses may, with approval of the department chair, be used to fulfill the 400-level requirement for the major. Prerequisite: Upper-class standing and 80 completed credits.

2 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

301-W02
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
A. Litke
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
6/3/0
Lecture
CRN 21953
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 21953

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Austin Dominic Litke

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

CISC: Computer & Info Sci (UG)

480-D01
Senior Capstone
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
R. Hardt
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20748
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OSS 429

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OSS 429

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OSS 429

   

Subject: Computer & Info Sci (UG) (CISC)

CRN: 20748

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 429
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Ryan Hardt

The senior capstone course provides computer science majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students will work in groups to design, document, and implement a large-sized software project. During this process, students will be exposed to programming team organization, software development practices, as well as tools that facilitate the development of software systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- or better in: CISC 350, CISC 340, and CISC 380 (which 380 may be taken concurrently)

4 Credits

480-D02
Senior Capstone
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
R. Hardt
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/10/0
Lecture
CRN 21853
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OSS 429

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OSS 429

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OSS 429

   

Subject: Computer & Info Sci (UG) (CISC)

CRN: 21853

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 429
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Ryan Hardt

The senior capstone course provides computer science majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students will work in groups to design, document, and implement a large-sized software project. During this process, students will be exposed to programming team organization, software development practices, as well as tools that facilitate the development of software systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- or better in: CISC 350, CISC 340, and CISC 380 (which 380 may be taken concurrently)

4 Credits

COMM: Communication Studies

480-01
Capstone: Communication Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
B. Armada
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
16/24/0
Lecture
CRN 21465
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 202

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 202

     

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 21465

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Bernard Armada

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront communication professionals and audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on communication ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues in communication, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills, and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisite: senior standing

4 Credits

DATA: Data Analytics

200-01
Data Analytics Seminar
 
R 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Kim
 
01/30 - 05/19
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 22663
1 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

     

Subject: Data Analytics (DATA)

CRN: 22663

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

  Matthew Kim

This seminar is designed to facilitate students’ exploration of their domain fields as they relate to Data Analytics. It brings together students from all domain areas to improve their data communication skills and broaden their understanding of data analytics. The seminar primarily focuses on the communication and dissemination of data analytic work, which may vary by domain. Prerequisites: Junior standing and one of the following: STAT 220, STAT 314, STAT 201, or MATH 303. 

1 Credits

400-01
Data Analytics Capstone
 
R 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Kim
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 22664
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

     

Subject: Data Analytics (DATA)

CRN: 22664

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Matthew Kim

This seminar is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Data Analytics. It brings together students from all domain areas to fine-tune their data communication skills, broaden their understanding of data analytics, and produce a portfolio of work. The seminar primarily focuses on the communication and dissemination of data analytic work, which may vary by domain. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Prerequisites: Senior standing, DATA 200, COMM 100, and one of the following: STAT 320, STAT 333, or ECON 315. 

2 Credits

DIMA: Digital Media Arts

480-D01
Digital Media for Common Good
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
Y. Feng
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
16/12/0
Lecture
CRN 21269
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 303

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 303

       

Subject: Digital Media Arts (DIMA)

CRN: 21269

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 303
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Yayu Feng

This class represents the culmination of learning in the program and provides a capstone involving the planning and creation of a large-scale digital media project within the student's area of emphasis and a professional demo reel or portfolio, including components dealing with the ethical responsibilities of media producers and how the student’s work reflects those responsibilities. It is required of all majors. Prerequisite: Senior Standing

4 Credits

EDUC: Education (UG)

431-01
Learning Design with Tech
 
See Details
L. Payne
Core 
TBD
25/19/0
Lecture
CRN 22542
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
         

02/04:
10:15 am
11:15 am
Online

03/11:
10:15 am
11:15 am
Online

05/06:
10:15 am
11:15 am
Online

 

Subject: Education (UG) (EDUC)

CRN: 22542

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Lucy Payne

This course examines learning theories, philosophies and their implications on the use of technology, as well as the history and development of learning technologies. Additionally, students will examine current trends and future challenges in education technology. Students will learn a variety of learning technologies and advocate sound integration of technology into curriculum. Issues on the design, development, and implementation of technology will be discussed. Students will integrate learning technologies into their curriculum planning in the specific content areas that address student needs and meet with the technology or content standards. As a capstone project, students will develop a portfolio to reflect upon the knowledge and skills acquired through their major. Prerequisites: EDUC 460 or 463, which can be taken concurrently, and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

405-D01
Advanced Creative Writing
 
W 6:00 pm - 9:15 pm
L. Miller
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
12/7/0
Lecture
CRN 20400
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

6:00 pm
9:15 pm
JRC 401

       

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 20400

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 401
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Leslie Miller

This advanced course will focus on the student’s development of a substantial body of work in a chosen genre: poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students will review their previous writing, do further exploration of a chosen genre, and produce significant new work in that genre. Reading will include theoretical and creative texts. This course fulfills a writing requirement in the English with Creative Writing Emphasis major. Prerequisite: ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or permission of instructor based on examination of a portfolio, and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

481-D01
Sem: Lit for Social Transform
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
O. Herrera
ENGL*CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
12/7/0
Lecture
CRN 21956
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 319

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 319

       

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21956

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 319
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Requirements Met:
     English Diversity Req.
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Olga Herrera

In her Nobel Prize acceptance speech of 1993, Toni Morrison reflects on the power of language to oppress or to liberate. “Word-work is sublime,” she writes, “because it is generative; it makes meaning that secures our difference, our human difference.” This capstone seminar takes as its premise Morrison’s assertion that “word-work” reaches beyond the page to shape our worlds and to constitute our experiences, and delves into the power of literature to effect societal change. We will study the works of a curated group of authors that have changed the way that we understand social justice and equity through their fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. Authors and texts may include Toni Morrison’s THE BLUEST EYE, BELOVED, and PLAYING IN THE DARK; James Baldwin’s THE FIRE NEXT TIME; Louise Erdrich’s THE NIGHT WATCHMAN; Gloria Anzaldua’s BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA, and other selected readings. In this course, students will pursue self-designed research questions and complete research projects that can become part of a portfolio for graduate or job applications. Students will also engage in vocational exploration and reflection on their time as an English major as part of the course’s signature work experience. This course satisfies the capstone seminar requirement for English with Literature Emphasis majors. Prerequisite: Five ENGL courses at or beyond ENGL 211 including ENGL 280, or instructor permission.

4 Credits

ENTR: Entrepreneurship

450-01
Entr:Management/Strategy
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
D. Ailts Campeau
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
22/19/0
Lecture
CRN 22115
4 Cr.
Size: 22
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 106

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 106

     

Subject: Entrepreneurship (ENTR)

CRN: 22115

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 106
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Danielle Ailts Campeau

This is the Entrepreneurship Concentration capstone course. This course builds upon previous coursework, drawing together critical concepts including opportunity identification, business modeling, financial modeling, and market/industry research skills. Through lecture, case discussion, and extensive use of the Hotwash Process, students polish their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. The primary deliverable is a Fundable Business Plan. Prerequisites: ENTR 100 or 200 or 260; and ENTR 250 or 350; and ENTR 370; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200 and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

450-02
Entr:Management/Strategy
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
D. Ailts Campeau
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
22/22/0
Lecture
CRN 22116
4 Cr.
Size: 22
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 106

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 106

     

Subject: Entrepreneurship (ENTR)

CRN: 22116

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 106
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Danielle Ailts Campeau

This is the Entrepreneurship Concentration capstone course. This course builds upon previous coursework, drawing together critical concepts including opportunity identification, business modeling, financial modeling, and market/industry research skills. Through lecture, case discussion, and extensive use of the Hotwash Process, students polish their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. The primary deliverable is a Fundable Business Plan. Prerequisites: ENTR 100 or 200 or 260; and ENTR 250 or 350; and ENTR 370; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200 and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

ENVR: Environmental Studies

401-D01
Field Seminar
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
T. Siebenaler-Ransom
SUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 20228
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 414

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 414

     

Subject: Environmental Studies (ENVR)

CRN: 20228

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Tony Siebenaler-Ransom

A capstone course that combines field experience with classroom seminar. Student teams will conduct collaborative broadly interdisciplinary analyses of selected environmental problems. Field-based projects are chosen by the students in consultation with course instructor. Classroom seminars are used for exchange of information between teams and for discussion of readings pertinent to individual research projects or, more broadly, to the interdisciplinary character of environmental problem-solving. Each team produces a major paper that examines the selected problems through humanities, natural-science and social-science lenses. This class is cross-listed with, and is equivalent to, GEOG 402. Prerequisite: ENVR151, ENVR212, plus 20 credits from the 28 required competency credits in the major need to be completed before taking ENVR 401.

4 Credits

ESCI: Environmental Science

430-D01
Senior Research Seminar
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
T. Hickson
ESCISUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 20572
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OSS 120

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OSS 120

     

Subject: Environmental Science (ESCI)

CRN: 20572

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 120
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Environmental Sci. Major Appr
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Thomas Hickson

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science. It brings together students from all the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects where students can integrate the knowledge gained in their distinct, yet complementary disciplinary tracks. The course will be a mix of research and seminar format designed to give students significant opportunities to practice the methods of scholarship and modes of communication used by environmental scientists. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Four laboratory hours per week. This course is a lecture-lab format, students registering for ESCI 430-D01 must also register for ESCI 430-D51. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor.

4 Credits

430-D51
Senior Research Seminar LAB
 
Blended
T. Hickson
ESCISUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/16/0
Lab
CRN 21351
0 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:25 pm
OSS 120

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Environmental Science (ESCI)

CRN: 21351

Blended Online & In-Person | Lab

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 120
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

Requirements Met:
     Environmental Sci. Major Appr
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Thomas Hickson

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science. It brings together students from all the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects where students can integrate the knowledge gained in their distinct, yet complementary disciplinary tracks. The course will be a mix of research and seminar format designed to give students significant opportunities to practice the methods of scholarship and modes of communication used by environmental scientists. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Four laboratory hours per week, 2 in-person and 2 asynchronous online lab hours. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor.

0 Credits

EXSC: Exercise Science

449-D01
Research Seminar
 
T 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Korak
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
19/19/2
Lecture/Lab
CRN 22342
2 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
ARC 205

         

Subject: Exercise Science (EXSC)

CRN: 22342

In Person | Lecture/Lab

St Paul: Anderson Ath and Rec Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Adam Korak

This course is designed to teach research methodology specific to the field of Exercise Science. Students are required to engage in hands-on research focused on an area of interest in the field of Exercise Science. Students will learn research skills, through locating primary literature sources, formulating a research question, conducting an original research study, and presenting it in several formats. Prerequisite: EXSC 426 and EXSC 432 and 80 completed credits.

2 Credits

449-D02
Research Seminar
 
R 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Korak
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
19/15/0
Lecture/Lab
CRN 22449
2 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

9:55 am
11:35 am
ARC 205

     

Subject: Exercise Science (EXSC)

CRN: 22449

In Person | Lecture/Lab

St Paul: Anderson Ath and Rec Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Adam Korak

This course is designed to teach research methodology specific to the field of Exercise Science. Students are required to engage in hands-on research focused on an area of interest in the field of Exercise Science. Students will learn research skills, through locating primary literature sources, formulating a research question, conducting an original research study, and presenting it in several formats. Prerequisite: EXSC 426 and EXSC 432 and 80 completed credits.

2 Credits

FINC: Finance

430-01
Financial Intermediaries
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
D. Vang
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
38/38/8
Lecture
CRN 22144
4 Cr.
Size: 38
Enrolled: 38
Waitlisted: 8
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 232

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 232

     

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 22144

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 232
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  David Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

430-02
Financial Intermediaries
 
T 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
D. Vang
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
39/39/8
Lecture
CRN 22145
4 Cr.
Size: 39
Enrolled: 39
Waitlisted: 8
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MCH 232

         

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 22145

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 232
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  David Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

GEOL: Geology

410-D01
Hydrogeology
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. McDermott
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 05/19
16/14/0
Lecture
CRN 22003
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OSS 120

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OSS 120

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OSS 120

   

Subject: Geology (GEOL)

CRN: 22003

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 120
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Jeni McDermott

This course focuses on groundwater and how geology influences its recharge, movement, storage, and withdrawal. The course will cover basic concepts of surface- and subsurface water flow, aquifer properties, well testing, heterogeneity in aquifers, groundwater chemistry and contamination, the role of groundwater in geological processes, and regional groundwater systems. Examples, labs, and projects will focus on groundwater in Minnesota and its immediate surroundings. This course is a lecture-lab format, students registering for GEOL 410-D01 must also register for GEOL 410-D51. Prerequisites: one of GEOL 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 161, 162, or 163 or permission of instructor plus 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

410-D51
Hydrogeology LAB
 
M 1:35 pm - 4:35 pm
J. McDermott
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 05/19
16/14/0
Lab
CRN 22004
0 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
4:35 pm
OSS 120

           

Subject: Geology (GEOL)

CRN: 22004

In Person | Lab

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 120
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Jeni McDermott

This course focuses on groundwater and how geology influences its recharge, movement, storage, and withdrawal. The course will cover basic concepts of surface- and subsurface water flow, aquifer properties, well testing, heterogeneity in aquifers, groundwater chemistry and contamination, the role of groundwater in geological processes, and regional groundwater systems. Examples, labs, and projects will focus on groundwater in Minnesota and its immediate surroundings. This course is a lecture-lab format, students registering for GEOL 410-D51 must also register for GEOL 410-D01. Prerequisites: one of GEOL 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115, 161, 162, or 163 or permission of instructor plus 80 completed credits.

0 Credits

HLTH: Health

430-01
Worksite Health Promotion
 
T 3:25 pm - 6:45 pm
A. Hedman-Robertson
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
24/6/0
Lecture
CRN 22711
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
6:45 pm
ARC 205

         

Subject: Health (HLTH)

CRN: 22711

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Anderson Ath and Rec Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Amy Hedman-Robertson

This course provides comprehensive coverage of worksite health promotion. Students will learn how to identify employees’ needs and interests for the purposes of planning worksite health promotion programs and strategies. Students will learn a variety of methods to promote a culture of health and prevention within a business. Project management principles covered in the course include goal setting and timeline development, employee engagement, budgeting, ethical and legal standards, vendor and community partnerships, communication, and leadership. Program evaluation approaches and designs will be discussed as well unique planning considerations for small businesses. Prerequisites: HLTH 250 or PUBH 220 or instructor approval and 80 completed credits

4 Credits

JOUR: Journalism/Mass Comm

480-D01
Journalism and Media Ethics
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
Y. Feng
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
16/6/0
Lecture
CRN 21280
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 303

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 303

     

Subject: Journalism/Mass Comm (JOUR)

CRN: 21280

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 303
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Yayu Feng

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront professionals in journalism and other fields of mass media, and their audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair.

4 Credits

MGMT: Management

430-D01
Global Strategy & Management
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Maloney
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
35/12/0
Lecture
CRN 22298
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 116

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 116

       

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22298

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 116
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mary Maloney

Companies face an increasing variety of choices about where to locate different value-creating activities. This course explores the opportunities and challenges associated with conducting business in a global context. The goal of this course is to provide the foundations for understanding the external global environment facing a multinational enterprise (MNE), and the internal challenges of managing an MNE. Specifically, this course examines the following topics: the forces behind globalization, the different cultural, political, legal and economic environments in which global businesses operate, the tradeoffs between global and local strategies, the alternatives available for coordinating activity in an MNE, and the unique challenges involved with managing people in a globally dispersed organization. Prerequisites: MGMT 305 and MKTG 300 or MGMT 200 and MGMT 391; BETH 300 or BETH 301; plus two courses (minimum of six credits) from the following: IBUS 450, IBUS 460, or IBUS 470; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

460-D01
Human Resource Strategy
 
Blended
L. Vatne
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
35/23/0
Lecture
CRN 22181
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MCH 115

           

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22181

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 115
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Leslie Vatne

This course focuses on the theories, concepts, research, and practice of human capital management that impacts employee behavior. Topics include systems theory, globalization, leading a contemporary human resource function, human resource careers, human capital strategy, human resource best practices, human resource analytics, and ROI analysis. Offered spring semester. Prerequisites: MGMT 360 or (MGMT 365 and MGMT 367); MGMT 362; BLAW 301, 302, 303 or BLAW 314; BETH 300 or 301; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior Standing.

4 Credits

480-D01
Strategic Management
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
D. Hirschey
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
35/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22182
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 232

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 232

       

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22182

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 232
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  David Hirschey

This course examines organizational issues from an integrative perspective. It draws on concepts from the entire business curriculum to view the organization as a whole. The focus of the course is to have you view the organization from the perspective of the president, rather than that of a manager of a particular function (e.g., VP of marketing). It examines the development of core competence and a sustainable competitive advantage as part of an organization's strategic planning process. Prerequisite: OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; FINC 310 or FINC 321; MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; MKTG 200 or MKTG 300; BETH 300 or BETH 301; and CISC 200 or BUSN 202; and senior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 480 may not receive credit for MGMT 395.

4 Credits

480-D02
Strategic Management
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Owens
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
35/22/0
Lecture
CRN 22183
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 115

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 115

     

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22183

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 115
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Ernest Owens

This course examines organizational issues from an integrative perspective. It draws on concepts from the entire business curriculum to view the organization as a whole. The focus of the course is to have you view the organization from the perspective of the president, rather than that of a manager of a particular function (e.g., VP of marketing). It examines the development of core competence and a sustainable competitive advantage as part of an organization's strategic planning process. Prerequisite: OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; FINC 310 or FINC 321; MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; MKTG 200 or MKTG 300; BETH 300 or BETH 301; and CISC 200 or BUSN 202; and senior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 480 may not receive credit for MGMT 395.

4 Credits

482-D01
Leadership Capstone
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
E. Owens
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
35/23/0
Lecture
CRN 22184
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 230

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 230

     

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22184

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 230
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Ernest Owens

This capstone course integrates and applies leadership knowledge, skills, character, and competencies. The course provides opportunities to think more systematically about leadership and organizations, its application, and the personal competencies needed for leadership success. The course is designed as an experiential, collaborative team exercise of leadership in a project-based setting. Students will learn about organizational leadership and management as well as develop their capacity for leading through principled initiative and influence. Prerequisites: MGMT 382; One of MGMT 360 or 388; OR MGMT 383 and MGMT 384 and MGMT 394; BETH 300 or BETH 301; Senior Standing

4 Credits

MKTG: Marketing

430-D01
Marketing Management
 
See Details
J. Al-Khatib
Core 
TBD
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 22239
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

01/31:
8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 100

02/02 - 05/19:
8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

 

02/02 - 05/19:
8:00 am
9:40 am
In Person

     

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 22239

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 100
     (Common Good capacity: 96 participants)

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Jamal Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

430-D02
Marketing Management
 
See Details
J. Al-Khatib
Core 
TBD
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 22240
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

01/31:
9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 100

02/01 - 05/19:
9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

02/01 - 05/19:
9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 22240

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 100
     (Common Good capacity: 96 participants)

St Paul: In Person

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Jamal Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

430-D03
Marketing Management
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Hoffman
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
24/24/3
Lecture
CRN 22241
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 108

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 108

       

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 22241

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 108
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Michael Hoffman

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

430-D04
Marketing Management
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Hoffman
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
24/24/1
Lecture
CRN 22242
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MCH 108

           

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 22242

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 108
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Michael Hoffman

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

430-D05
Marketing Management
 
Blended
K. Sovell
Core 
TBD
24/15/0
Lecture
CRN 22243
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

01/30 - 02/27:
3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

02/28 - 05/19:
3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 115

 

01/30 - 02/27:
3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

02/28 - 05/19:
3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 115

     

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 22243

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 115
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Kim Sovell

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

NSCI: Neuroscience

420-01
Sleep and Circadian Rhythms
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Prichard
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
18/16/0
Lecture
CRN 22598
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL45

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL45

     

Subject: Neuroscience (NSCI)

CRN: 22598

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL45
     (Common Good capacity: 22 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Roxanne Prichard

This capstone neuroscience course uses the physiological process of sleep as a lens to evaluate neural connectivity, neurochemical modulation, and sensory integration. This course will emphasize sleep as central to neural development, learning, and health. As part of the laboratory work, students will track their own sleep and circadian rhythms through temperature, behavioral, and hormonal assessment. Prerequisites: NSCI 301 and senior standing (or permission from the instructor).

4 Credits

420-51
Sleep and Circadian Rhythms
 
T 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Prichard
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
18/16/0
Lab
CRN 22599
0 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL45

         

Subject: Neuroscience (NSCI)

CRN: 22599

In Person | Lab

St Paul: John Roach Center LL45
     (Common Good capacity: 22 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Roxanne Prichard

This capstone neuroscience course uses the physiological process of sleep as a lens to evaluate neural connectivity, neurochemical modulation, and sensory integration. This course will emphasize sleep as central to neural development, learning, and health. As part of the laboratory work, students will track their own sleep and circadian rhythms through temperature, behavioral, and hormonal assessment. Prerequisites: NSCI 301 and senior standing (or permission from the instructor).

0 Credits

OPMT: Ops & Supply Chain Mgmt

480-D01
Op Strategy w/Integ Strategy
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
W. Raffield
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
23/22/0
Lecture
CRN 22272
4 Cr.
Size: 23
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 231

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 231

       

Subject: Ops & Supply Chain Mgmt (OPMT)

CRN: 22272

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 231
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  William Raffield

This course is the capstone course for majors in operations management. This integrative course in Operations Strategy has a strong managerial focus on the operating decisions that can impact a firm’s profitability in various manufacturing and service sectors. It serves as an integrator for the courses that had preceded it by giving students the opportunity to incorporate and refine the knowledge and skills developed in previous coursework. This course utilizes real-life cases and projects to understand managerial issues in operations and to develop a strategic perspective in the decision making process. Prerequisites: Senior standing; OPMT 320, OPMT 330, OPMT 340 and OPMT 350; and concurrent or prior enrollment in OPMT 375.

4 Credits

480-D02
Op Strategy w/Integ Strategy
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
W. Raffield
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
22/21/0
Lecture
CRN 22273
4 Cr.
Size: 22
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 231

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 231

       

Subject: Ops & Supply Chain Mgmt (OPMT)

CRN: 22273

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 231
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  William Raffield

This course is the capstone course for majors in operations management. This integrative course in Operations Strategy has a strong managerial focus on the operating decisions that can impact a firm’s profitability in various manufacturing and service sectors. It serves as an integrator for the courses that had preceded it by giving students the opportunity to incorporate and refine the knowledge and skills developed in previous coursework. This course utilizes real-life cases and projects to understand managerial issues in operations and to develop a strategic perspective in the decision making process. Prerequisites: Senior standing; OPMT 320, OPMT 330, OPMT 340 and OPMT 350; and concurrent or prior enrollment in OPMT 375.

4 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Blended
G. Frost
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/7
Lecture
CRN 21562
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 7
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

N/A
N/A
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21562

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-01
Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity
 
Blended
G. Frost
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
5/5/1
Lecture
CRN 22438
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

N/A
N/A
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22438

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197, and 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

235-01
Politics Law & Common Good
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
26/26/2
Lecture
CRN 21219
4 Cr.
Size: 26
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21219

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

Who has the authority to makes laws? What makes for good law? What is the connection between your earlier exploration in The Person and the Good, and these questions? What is justice? Can there be such a thing as private property? How are these ideas related to “the common good” that we keep hearing so much about? What notions of authority and justice have, in the real world, led to oppression and misery rather than human happiness? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on these topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-02
Sig.Wk:Politics Law CommonGood
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
4/4/0
Lecture
CRN 22584
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22584

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

245-01
Philosophy of Art and Beauty
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
30/29/1
Lecture
CRN 21503
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21503

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

What does it mean for something to be beautiful? Is beauty an objective property of things or is it entirely in the eye of the beholder? Are perceiving beauty, making beautiful things, and being beautiful essential to a flourishing human life? Should beauty be any more important to us than other aesthetic qualities like elegance, ugliness, horror, or being cool? What does it take for something to be a work of art? Do the answers to any of these questions have anything to do with God? In this class, we’ll talk about these questions and about some ways that philosophers have answered them. We’ll spend time discussing views from the ancient and medieval Catholic philosophical tradition. But we’ll spend most of the class discussing modern views, including some views on beauty and art from Indian and Japanese philosophy. Along the way, we’ll listen to some musical pieces, watch some films, and view some paintings that will help us better think about beauty and art. Our goal will be to come to a deeper appreciation of beauty and of its central role in a happy human life. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-03
Sig.Wk: PhilosophyArt & Beauty
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
0/0/0
Lecture
CRN 22440
4 Cr.
Size: 0
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22440

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

What does it mean for something to be beautiful? Is beauty an objective property of things or is it entirely in the eye of the beholder? Are perceiving beauty, making beautiful things, and being beautiful essential to a flourishing human life? Should beauty be any more important to us than other aesthetic qualities like elegance, ugliness, horror, or being cool? What does it take for something to be a work of art and does it have anything to do with beauty? Do the answers to any of these questions have anything to do with God? In this class, we’ll talk about these questions and about some ways that philosophers throughout history have answered them. We’ll start by discussing some views from the ancient and medieval Catholic philosophical tradition. But we’ll spend most of the class discussing contemporary views, including those from non-European traditions. Along the way, we’ll listen to some musical pieces, watch some films, and view some paintings that will help us better think about beauty and art. Our goal will be to come to a deeper appreciation of beauty and of its central role in a happy human life. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

255-01
Technology and Ethics
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
M. Winter
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
28/28/0
Lecture
CRN 21994
4 Cr.
Size: 28
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21994

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-04
Sig.Wk.: Technology & Ethics
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
M. Winter
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
2/2/1
Lecture
CRN 22442
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22442

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

258-01
Environmental Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
27/24/0
Lecture
CRN 20950
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 20950

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

A consideration of the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment, including inquiry into the scope and justification of our obligations concerning the environment. Possible topics include: the question of who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration, animal welfare, species preservation, conservation, climate change, environmental racism, population pressure, sustainability, and what it means to say that human beings are charged with the care of Creation. Special attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within Catholic intellectual tradition, in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-05
Sig.Wk.: Environmental Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
3/3/0
Lecture
CRN 22439
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22439

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

A consideration of the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment, including inquiry into the scope and justification of our obligations concerning the environment. Possible topics include: the question of who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration, animal welfare, species preservation, conservation, climate change, environmental racism, population pressure, sustainability, and what it means to say that human beings are charged with the care of Creation. Special attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within Catholic intellectual tradition, in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-D8
Sig.Wk.: Philosophy of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Rota
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
1/0/0
Lecture
CRN 22586
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22586

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. We will also briefly explore work from contemporary analytic philosophers on the fine-tuning argument, reformed epistemology, the problem of evil, and Pascal’s Wager. The mode of instruction will alternate between seminar-style discussion (on Tuesdays) and Socratic lecture (on Thursdays). Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

460-D2
Philosophy of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Rota
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/13/0
Lecture
CRN 21987
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21987

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. We will also briefly explore work from contemporary analytic philosophers on the fine-tuning argument, reformed epistemology, the problem of evil, and Pascal’s Wager. The mode of instruction will alternate between seminar-style discussion (on Tuesdays) and Socratic lecture (on Thursdays). Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

301-D7
Sig.Wk.: Philosophy of God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
0/0/0
Lecture
CRN 22585
4 Cr.
Size: 0
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22585

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. In this course, we will consider some central issues in that discipline. The class will begin by discussing arguments for the existence of God and other ways in which we can naturally know God, especially perceiving God by perceiving beauty. Next, we will think about attributes of God that can be known by human reason, such as divine goodness, simplicity, and freedom. Finally, we will consider issues having to do with the relation between creatures and God, such as creation, conservation, providence, and predestination. We will read from Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae and from authors in the analytic, Reformed, Byzantine, and polytheistic traditions, as well as from those who object in various ways to theism. Writing a major paper and preparing for a public presentation will be a central focus of the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

460-D1
Philosophy of God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/17/2
Lecture
CRN 21986
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21986

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. In this course, we will consider some central issues in that discipline. The class will begin by discussing arguments for the existence of God and other ways by which we can naturally know God. Next, we will think about attributes of God that can be known by human reason, such as divine goodness, simplicity, and freedom. Finally, we will consider issues having to do with the relation between creatures and God, such as creation, conservation, providence, and predestination. We will read from Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae and from authors in the analytic, Reformed, Byzantine, and polytheistic traditions, as well as from those who object to theism. Writing a major paper and preparing for a public presentation will be a central focus of the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 365

4 Credits

POLS: Political Science

400-01
Signature Work Capstone
 
M 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Buhr
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/10/0
Lecture
CRN 21757
2 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online

           

Subject: Political Science (POLS)

CRN: 21757

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Renee Buhr

This course is intended to give political science majors and those in related fields an opportunity to reflect and to look forward. A number of class sessions will be dedicated to particular subfields of political science. POLS faculty will discuss the opportunities and challenges in their respective subfields, and will provide you with opportunities to think critically about crucial, timely issues that those subfields are uniquely positioned to address today and into the future. Other sessions will provide you with guidance and time to work on an interdisciplinary portfolio of work and accompanying integrative essay reflecting on your liberal arts training at UST. Prerequisites: Completion of at least two 300-level POLS courses or permission of instructor and 80 completed credits.

2 Credits

PSYC: Psychology (UG)

422-01
History of Psych in Context
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Johnson
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/17/0
Lecture
CRN 20185
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL01

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL01

     

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 20185

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

422-02
History of Psych in Context
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Johnson
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/11/0
Lecture
CRN 21476
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL62

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL62

       

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 21476

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

PUBH: Public Health

485-D01
Senior Seminar: PUBH
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Hedman-Robertson
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
24/12/0
Lecture
CRN 21253
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
ARC 204

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
ARC 204

     

Subject: Public Health (PUBH)

CRN: 21253

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Anderson Ath and Rec Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Amy Hedman-Robertson

This is the senior capstone seminar for public health majors. The overarching aim of the course is toprovide students with a culminating experience to their overall studies in undergraduate public health.Students will bring to this course all of the knowledge and tools of analysis that they have learned in publichealth throughout their undergraduate tenure. This seminar allows students majoring in public health toanalyze specific issues and problems using the knowledge and understanding gained by completing therequired courses in the program and an experiential learning or research experience. Prerequisites: PUBH 465 or 470 and be senior standing or get permission of the instructor.

4 Credits

REAL: Real Estate Studies

470-D01
Real Estate Development
 
W 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
A. Babula
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/18/0
Lecture
CRN 22288
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
SCH 407

       

Subject: Real Estate Studies (REAL)

CRN: 22288

In Person | Lecture

Minneapolis: Schulze Hall 407
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

  Andy Babula

Capstone course integrating all functional areas of real estate for production of housing, commercial and industrial real estate. Use of market research, feasibility studies and market analysis in contract negotiation for project construction, marketing and management. Prerequisites: REAL 380, BLAW 304, and Sophomore standing.

4 Credits

SOCI: Sociology

474-01
Soci Theory & Praxis: Capstone
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
L. Fischer
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 05/19
30/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20834
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 454

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 454

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 454

   

Subject: Sociology (SOCI)

CRN: 20834

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Signature Work

  Laura Fischer

An examination of classical and contemporary theories in sociology, including functionalism, conflict theory, and symbolic interaction. Theories are explored in an applied manner to develop the ability to understand/solve social problems and issues in a sociological context. Key sociological principles and concepts will be utilized in the completion of a significant scholarly research project. Careers and preparation for graduate school will also be addressed. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 and SOCI 210 and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

SOWK: Social Work (UG)

406-01
Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem II
 
M 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
E. Solomonson
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
12/11/0
Lecture
CRN 20406
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
SCB 130

           

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 20406

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 130
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work

  Eva Solomonson

See description for SOWK 405. SOWK 406 is the spring course. Concurrent registration in SOWK 402 is required.

4 Credits

406-02
Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem II
 
R 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
C. O'Neal
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20563
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
SCB 110

     

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 20563

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 110
     (Common Good capacity: 56 participants)

Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work

  Catrice O'Neal

See description for SOWK 405. SOWK 406 is the spring course. Concurrent registration in SOWK 402 is required.

4 Credits

STAT: Statistics

460-01
Statistical Practicum
 
See Details
S. Berg
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
24/11/0
Lecture
CRN 20820
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OSS 429

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OSS 429

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Statistics (STAT)

CRN: 20820

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 429
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Online

Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

  Sergey Berg

This course provides students the opportunity to develop and pursue an advanced statistical analysis with real world relevance and application. In addition to working with a faculty instructor, students are also given the opportunity to collaborate with professional mentors from various industries and to participate in national competitions. Previous sponsors include the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, the Travelers Companies, U.S. Bancorp, SCOR Reinsurance, Drake Bank, and numerous professors from other departments at St. Thomas. Grade of C- or higher in STAT 360 and senior standing.

4 Credits

STCM: Strategic Communication

480-01
Capstone: Campaigns
 
R 6:00 pm - 9:30 pm
P. Omodt
SUSTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
24/13/0
Lecture
CRN 22428
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

6:00 pm
9:30 pm
OEC 313

     

Subject: Strategic Communication (STCM)

CRN: 22428

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 313
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

Requirements Met:
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work

  Paul Omodt

This capstone course will integrate content knowledge with experiential skills to develop strategic communication campaigns. Students will work with clients in teams to identify client’s goals, develop advertising, public relations, and media strategies, and set measures to evaluate the effectiveness of campaigns, while maintaining relationships with key audiences. Prerequisites: Graduating seniors or permission of department chair or program director

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

224-L41
HNRS Bridges: Theology&Beauty
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. McInroy
HonorMUMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
17/14/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 21814
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21814

In Person | Topics Lecture 8

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith. 

4 Credits

300-L41
HNRS Signature: Theo & Beauty
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. McInroy
HonorMUMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
3/2/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 21466
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21466

In Person | Topics Lecture 8

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Signature Work
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith. 

4 Credits

229-L03
Professions: Faith & Law
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Spencer
CoreLSMRSCCGCGood 
01/30 - 05/19
19/19/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 22405
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC LL62

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22405

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Marguerite Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

4 Credits

300-D03
Signature: Faith & Law
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Spencer
CoreLSMRCGood 
01/30 - 05/19
5/5/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 21470
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC LL62

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21470

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Marguerite Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

4 Credits

436-L03
Chrstian Fath & Legal Profes
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Spencer
LSMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
3/3/0
Lecture
CRN 22731
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC LL62

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22731

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     Writing to learn

  Marguerite Spencer

If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

4 Credits

300-L04
Signature: Nazism & Apartheid
 
Online
K. Vrudny
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
32/32/2
Topics Lecture 12
CRN 21469
4 Cr.
Size: 32
Enrolled: 32
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21469

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 12

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kimberly Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section will focus on the patterns that emerged in both contexts—Germany under Hitler; South Africa under apartheid: economic anxiety; the rise of nationalism; the election of a tyrant; theological rationales for tyranny, torture, and even genocide; theological and artistic resistance; the complicated role of Catholicism in each setting; and legal processes in the aftermath.

4 Credits


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