Results

Enrollment and waitlist data for current and upcoming courses refresh every 10 minutes; all other information as of 6:00 AM.


Refine Search Results

ARTH: Art History (UG)

202-L02
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/31
Lecture
CRN 21914
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 31
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 311

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 21914

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 311
     (Common Good capacity: 31 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

301-01
Signature Work: Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22713
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 22713

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

ARTH 301 is a signature work course in art history.  Topics vary from section to section, but all art history Signature Work courses focus on interdisciplinary perspectives in the field of art history, the integration of learning, and the relevance of our work as art historians to the university’s mission. The various sections focus on an gaining an understanding of art through a careful exploration of the historical, social, and cultural context of its production. This course calls upon students to reflect on knowledge they have built throughout their academic careers and to explore and integrate their learning in an interdisciplinary fashion. Prerequisites: 4 credits in ARTH coursework and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course

4 Credits

202-L01
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/21
Lecture
CRN 21913
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 21
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 311

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 21913

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 311
     (Common Good capacity: 31 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

204-L01
Typography and Visual Culture
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
C. Eliason
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/5
Lecture
CRN 22445
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 5
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 203

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 203

       

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 22445

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Craig Eliason

An investigation of the history of typography and type design from the earliest developments of movable type to the global digital typography of the present day. We will look at what needs typography served in the broader culture, and how the forms of letters and their arrangements reflected those needs. We will learn about the changing technologies of type-founding and printing, and how they shaped the designs of letterforms and pages. Throughout the course we will contextualize typeforms within their contemporary visual culture, drawing relationships to fine arts, popular arts, and the broader design world.

4 Credits

251-L01
Museum Studies: Practices
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Mickelson
MsumCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/2
Lecture
CRN 21240
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 414

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 414

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 21240

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Art History Museum Studies
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Mickelson

This course provides an investigation of the critical issues facing museums in the 21st century. Museum missions, practices, and resources will be interwoven with a discussion of audience, communication, and collaboration. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

4 Credits

265-L01
Ancient Mesoamerica
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
W. Barnes
LACMCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/2
Lecture
CRN 22444
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 414

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 414

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 22444

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     LatAm/Caribb Minor
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  William Barnes

ARTH 265 Art and Archaeology of Ancient Mesoamerica: This course introduces students to the art, architecture, and archaeology of the Aztecs, Maya, Olmec, Zapotecs, and their contemporaries in Pre-Columbian America. Participants will explore the rich cultural history of this region (that includes parts of Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador), and investigate how the art, architecture, and archeological remains of Mesoamerican peoples can be used to expand our knowledge of their religious practices, ideology, and societal institutions

4 Credits

310-L01
Roman Art and Archaeology
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
V. Rousseau
CLASCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/0
Lecture
CRN 22446
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 414

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 414

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 22446

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Vanessa Rousseau

A survey of the art of the Roman Republic and Empire to the emperor Constantine in the early fourth century C.E. Issues include the use of art and architecture as an expression of imperial political programs, the creation of urban architecture and the everyday environment of the Romans, and Rome's relationship to Greece and the Near East.

4 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

205-01
Crisis and Development
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
R. Kennedy
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/0
Lecture
CRN 20905
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 20905

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

4 Credits

222-L01
Catholic Literary Tradition
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 22292
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S B10

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S B10

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 22292

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

What makes a text a work of Catholic literature? How do Catholic writers struggle with the existential questions of meaning, purpose, or suffering in a unique fashion? How do the themes they engage—such as forgiveness, redemption, or the power of grace in the world—place them within the Catholic tradition? Is there a sacramental imagination or incarnational theology at the root of a work of Catholic literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Catholic literature in both English and translation from the medieval era through the present. In addition to satisfying a WAC Writing to Learn requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, this course also satisfies the Historical Perspectives requirement for English with Literature Emphasis and English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors, and a literature requirement for English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors. Finally, It also satisfies a 2XX Traditions requirement for Catholic Studies majors. This is a cross-listed course, with 10 seats on the ENGL side and 10 seats on the CATH side. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.  

4 Credits

301-01
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
A. Litke
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 20011
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 20011

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Austin Dominic Litke

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

301-W02
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
A. Litke
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
6/3/0
Lecture
CRN 21953
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
55S 207

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 21953

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Austin Dominic Litke

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

340-01
Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Kennedy
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/10/0
Lecture
CRN 21166
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 21166

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

4 Credits

CLAS: Classical Civilization

245-W01
Classical Mythology
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
L. Hepner
CLASCoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 20997
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 306

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 306

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 306

   

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 20997

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 306
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

397-01
Topics: Envr Issues in Ancient
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
R. Quartarone
CLASSUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/23/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 22651
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 22651

Online: Some Synchronous | Topics Lecture 1

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rina Quartarone

Through lenses both ancient and modern, this course examines how the ancient Greeks and Romans imagined, sought to understand, appreciated and utilized the earth and its natural resources. Focal points include ancient concepts of and attitudes toward the environment, the interconnection and interdependency between natural elements as well as between humans and the earth, appreciation for the landscape, and awareness of environmental issues and sustainability. Explorations include representations of the earth, animals and nature in myth, art, literature, architecture and currency. Ancient literary excerpts will be highly specific and focused; modern sources will provide context & background information on important figures & works.

4 Credits

COMM: Communication Studies

370-01
Intercultural Communication
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
X. Guan
FAPXCoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
24/24/6
Lecture
CRN 21180
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 6
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 302

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 302

       

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 21180

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 302
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Xiaowen Guan

This course examines the influence of culture on our own and others’ communication. Students will be introduced to different aspects and levels of culture, including basic principles and theories that explain cultural differences on the group level, and challenges in intercultural communication, such as stereotypes, ethnocentrism, conflicting ethical standards, and racial disparities. Through lectures, discussions and first-hand practice, students are expected to form global perspectives and become more competent in intercultural communication. Students are advised to take the course either during or after the sophomore year.

4 Credits

370-02
Intercultural Communication
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
X. Guan
FAPXCoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 23046
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 302

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 302

       

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 23046

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 302
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Xiaowen Guan

This course examines the influence of culture on our own and others’ communication. Students will be introduced to different aspects and levels of culture, including basic principles and theories that explain cultural differences on the group level, and challenges in intercultural communication, such as stereotypes, ethnocentrism, conflicting ethical standards, and racial disparities. Through lectures, discussions and first-hand practice, students are expected to form global perspectives and become more competent in intercultural communication. Students are advised to take the course either during or after the sophomore year.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

201-W01
Horror Literature and Film
 
Blended
S. Scott
CoreFLMJFLMRFILMSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/4
Lecture
CRN 22495
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 4
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 204

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22495

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Film Studies Major Approved
     Film Studies Minor Approved
     Film Studies History&Analysis
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Shannon Scott

Many fans, critics, and creators agree that we are living in a Golden Age of Horror. From new fiction by Carmen Maria Machado, Stephen Graham Jones, and Tiphanie Yanique, to new films such as GET OUT (Jordan Peele 2017) and HEREDITARY (Aster 2018), the genre is proving to be finely crafted, highly literary and character driven. In other words, horror in the twenty-first century is much more than slasher films, body gore, splatterpunk, and jump scares. The horror genre explores the human condition through the emotion of fear—fear of pain, disease, isolation, of being lost, consumed, or prey to supernatural forces. However, horror also teaches us how to handle those fears. According to writer Ruthanna Emrys, “Horror as a genre is built around one truth: that the world is full of fearful things. But the best horror tells us more. It tells us how to live with being afraid.” This course explores horror from early tales like Bluebeard, to Gothic classics by Poe, Stoker, and Stevenson in the nineteenth century, to American cinema’s Universal Studios monster films, to contemporary works by Paul Tremblay, Gwendolyn Kiste and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement, an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, and a Film Studies major and minor History and Analysis requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

201-W02
The American Short Story
 
Blended
K. Larson
AMCDCoreSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/6
Lecture
CRN 21964
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 6
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 209

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21964

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

201-W03
The American Short Story
 
Blended
K. Larson
AMCDCoreSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/9
Lecture
CRN 21965
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 9
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21965

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W01
Narrative Medicine
 
Blended
A. Muse
CGoodENGL*Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/1
Lecture
CRN 21967
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21967

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Narrative Medicine Minor Appr
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Muse

Increasingly, education for nurses, physicians, and other healthcare professionals includes the practices of reading literature, writing reflectively, and engaging in role-play to learn how to care for patients (and for themselves). This is sometimes called narrative medicine. By focusing on stories (of the patient, the healthcare professional, and the cultures and systems in which both live) and therefore humanizing the often-impersonal world of the healthcare system, it improves the quality of care for patients and reduces burnout among healthcare professionals. In this course we will read and write about literature as a means of understanding ourselves and others. The texts we’ll read illuminate questions about pain and illness, empathy and the training of healthcare professionals, the health implications of racial and economic injustice, and the need for reformation of the healthcare system. This course can be used as a first step to an English minor in Narrative Medicine. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

202-W02
Business & American Identity
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
D. Jones
CoreSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22521
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 227

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 227

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 227

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22521

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W03
Sports and Social Justice
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
L. Wilkinson
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/2
Lecture
CRN 21971
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 212

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 212

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21971

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and a BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING anthology. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W04
Sports and Social Justice
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
L. Wilkinson
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21972
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 210

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 210

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21972

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and a BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING anthology. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W05
Literature and Photography
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
E. James
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21973
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 313

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 313

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21973

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 313
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Emily James

This course examines intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from theoretical and critical sources on visual culture, we will apply certain key terms and concepts—from ekphrasis to punctum—to photo-essays, graphic novels, and fiction about visual artists. Writers may include Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, W. G. Sebald, John Berger, Claudia Rankine, Teju Cole, and Solmaz Sharif. This course may involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W07
Wild Writing:Lit of Natural Wr
 
Online
G. Grice
CoreSUST 
01/30 - 05/19
20/19/8
Lecture
CRN 22496
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 8
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22496

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gordon Grice

Since the days of Leonardo da Vinci, writers of natural history have straddled science and literature in their attempts to understand the world. We'll read and analyze the works of great naturalists and incorporate some of their strategies--empirical observation, reporting, academic research, memoir--into our own writing. Authors may include Italian biologist Francesco Redi, French naturalist Jean-Henri Fabre, U.S. poet Robert Frost, and others. The writing load for this fully online asynchronous course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies both a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W01
Surviving Adolescence
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 21976
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 311

     

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 311

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21976

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 311
     (Common Good capacity: 31 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

British poet William Wordsworth wrote, "the Child is father of the Man"; what he meant, and explored thoughtfully in his writing, was that the experiences of childhood and adolescence serve as the foundation for the adult self a person will become. Wordsworth was clear: both joyful and painful adolescent experiences shape our characters. We will read both young adult and classic literature that focuses on the process of "surviving adolescence"--books in which writers reflect on how they or their characters navigate that challenging transition between childhood and adulthood. Possible texts may include William Shakespeare's AS YOU LIKE IT, Louisa May Alcott's LITTLE WOMEN, Roald Dahl's MATILDA, Corinne Duyvis's ON THE EDGE OF GONE, and one Harry Potter text by J.K. Rowling. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W02
Storm: Disasters in Lit & Film
 
Blended
M. Harrison
SUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22497
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 313

     

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 313

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22497

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 313
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Matthew Harrison

When a disaster happens, it can overwhelm our sense of reason and justice, test our capacity for empathy, and force into debate our assumptions regarding social order. Writing about disaster is an acrobatic act of reflection, mourning, coping, and investigation, but to what end? To establish blame? To preach or to rebuild character? To prepare better for the next disaster? Whatever the case, tales about disasters tend to blend strategies of personal narrative, myth, and history to bring the tragedies of titanic events back to the scale of human understanding. This course explores novels and films that depict various catastrophic “storms” in an effort to document, heal, warn, and find meaning in the apparently meaningless. Possible readings will include Daniel Defoe’s A JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR, Jesmyn Ward’s SALVAGE THE BONES; Paolo Bacigalupi’s THE WATER KNIFE Dimitry Elias Léger’s GOD LOVES HAITI; and Joshua Mehigan’s book of poetry, ACCEPTING THE DISASTER. Possible films will include CONTAGION (Soderbergh, 2011), BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (Zeitlin, 2012), clips from THE DUST BOWL (Burns, 2012), and THE IMPOSSIBLE (Bayona, 2013). Students will write weekly short papers on guided topics, a final research essay, and also work in groups throughout the semester to develop a disaster prevention or survival guide. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies both a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

215-L01
American Authors II
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Scheiber
AMCDCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/19/4
Lecture
CRN 21984
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 4
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21984

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Andrew Scheiber

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. In addition to satisfying a core Integrations in the Humanities requirement and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, this course also fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement for English with Literature Emphasis and English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors, a literature requirement for English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors, and is one of two options for English with Secondary Education Emphasis majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. 

4 Credits

221-L01
The Modern Tradition
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Phillips
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21968
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 210

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 210

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 210

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21968

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Doug Phillips

What might it mean to speak of “the modern tradition”? What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? How does the modern tradition help us understand about concepts such as authorship, originality, literacy, and literary excellence? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from the seventeenth century through the present, including some interactions of the European traditions with modern African, Latin American, or Asian literatures. Authors may include Racine, Goethe, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Rilke, Solzhenitsyn, Duras, Lispector, and Achebe. This course satisfies both the Integrations in the Humanities and the Global Perspectives core requirements as well as a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, This course also fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement for English with a Literature Emphasis and English with a Creative Writing Emphasis majors, a literature requirement for English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors, and one of two options for English with Secondary Education Emphasis majors.. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190. 

4 Credits

222-L01
Catholic Literary Tradition
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
10/6/0
Lecture
CRN 21969
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S B10

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
55S B10

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21969

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

What makes a text a work of Catholic literature? How do Catholic writers struggle with the existential questions of meaning, purpose, or suffering in a unique fashion? How do the themes they engage—such as forgiveness, redemption, or the power of grace in the world—place them within the Catholic tradition? Is there a sacramental imagination or incarnational theology at the root of a work of Catholic literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Catholic literature in both English and translation from the medieval era through the present. In addition to satisfying a WAC Writing to Learn requirement and an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, this course also satisfies the Historical Perspectives requirement for English with Literature Emphasis and English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors, and a literature requirement for English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors. Finally, It also satisfies a 2XX Traditions requirement for Catholic Studies majors. This is a cross-listed course, with 10 seats on the ENGL side and 10 seats on the CATH side. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

315-D01
Topics in PW: Business Writing
 
Blended
K. Davis
COMJFAPXCore 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/1
Lecture
CRN 22321
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 305

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 305

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22321

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 305
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     COMM Major Approved
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Katlynne Davis

In this blended course (meets on in-person on Monday/Wednesday from 10:55am-12:00pm; remainder of class is online asynchronous), students will engage with effective business writing practices and the research that supports them. Topics center on how to communicate ideas succinctly in writing, make persuasive arguments for stakeholders, and/or narrativize and synthesize data. Student work may include researching solutions to local problems, creating documents necessary to make decisions and take action, and drafting white papers for presenting and disseminating findings. This course satisfies a requirement for English with a Professional Writing Emphasis majors, an allied requirement for select Business majors, an elective course for Communication Studies majors, and a WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement. This course satisfies the Integrations in the Humanities core requirement as well. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

315-D02
Topics in PW: Business Writing
 
Blended
K. Davis
COMJFAPXCore 
01/30 - 05/19
15/16/3
Lecture
CRN 22322
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 305

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 305

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22322

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 305
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     COMM Major Approved
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Katlynne Davis

In this blended course (meets in-person on Monday/Wednesday from 12:15-1:20pm; remainder of class is online asynchronous), students will engage with effective business writing practices and the research that supports them. Topics center on how to communicate ideas succinctly in writing, make persuasive arguments for stakeholders, and/or narrativize and synthesize data. Student work may include researching solutions to local problems, creating documents necessary to make decisions and take action, and drafting white papers for presenting and disseminating findings. This course satisfies a requirement for English with a Professional Writing Emphasis majors, an allied requirement for select Business majors, an elective course for Communication Studies majors, and a WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement. This course satisfies the Integrations in the Humanities core requirement as well. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

324-L01
Genre Study:African Amer Drama
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
ENGL*Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 21962
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 201

     

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 201

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21962

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     English Diversity Req.
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Penumbra Theatre Company has as its mission to present "artistically excellent productions that depict emotional, relevant, and valuable experiences from an African-American perspective." Despite social restrictions that created major barriers to its development, black theater companies like Penumbra fostered award-winning playwrights, actors, directors, choreographers, and designers. This course aims to explore some of those writers and productions, particularly those staged at Penumbra, and with some form of educational collaboration with Penumbra. Works may include a selection of the following: Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN; Ntozake Shange's FOR COLORED GIRLS WHO HAVE CONSIDERED SUICIDE/WHEN THE RAINBOW IS ENUF; Charles Fuller's A SOLDIER'S PLAY; and one or more of August Wilson's plays, including GEM OF THE OCEAN, FENCES, and/or RADIO GOLF. This course satisfies BOTH an Integrations in the Humanities core requirement and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement In addition, this course satisfies an English Genre Studies requirement for both English with Literature Emphasis and English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors and a literature requirement for English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors. It also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn Requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

337-L01
Latinx Literature
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
O. Herrera
FAPXLACMENGL*CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22297
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 317

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 317

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 317

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22297

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 317
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     LatAm/Caribb Minor
     English Diversity Req.
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Olga Herrera

Science fiction, romance, political treatises, poetry, autobiography, historical fiction—these are all genres through which Latino, Latina, and Latinx writers have created literary worlds and expressed their hopes and desires for themselves and their communities. This course examines literature as a powerful means of expression and representation for one of the fastest growing populations in the US, and considers the impact of Latinx literature, art, film, and culture on US society. We will read authors from diverse Latinx backgrounds, including Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Victor LaValle, Erika Sanchez, Angie Cruz, Daisy Hernandez, Elizabeth Acevedo, Kali Fajardo-Anstine, as well as film and television by Gregory Nava, Robert Rodriguez, Tanya Saracho, and others. This course satisfies the following requirements: English with Literature Emphasis and English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors Human Diversity requirement; a Contexts and Convergences requirement for English with Literature majors; a 300-level elective course for English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors; an Integrations in the Humanities core requirement; a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice core requirement, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

341-L01
Women, Sport, & the Body
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
L. Wilkinson
FAPXENGL*CoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/2
Lecture
CRN 21970
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 227

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 227

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21970

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     English Diversity Req.
     Writing to learn
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

This course uses literature to investigate how female athletes use their sport and their bodies to fight for women's rights and to change our world. In 1894-1895, Annie Londonderry biked around the world and spoke out for equality. Frances Willard advocated for the eight-hour workday, equal pay for women, and suffrage, then learned to ride a bike at age 53, and wrote about the freedom biking gave to women. In the winter of 1912 in New York, women walked 170 miles in Suffrage Hikes advocating for their right to vote. These women paved the way for athlete-authors such as Lynne Cox (who held the world record for swimming the English Channel) and Maxine Kumin (who, along with being U.S. Poet Laureate and a Pulitzer Prize winner, was a collegiate swimmer and rower). These and other great women writers explore their sports and their bodies in ways that both reflect and contest societal restrictions and expectations. This course will use their texts and other essays, articles, short stories, novels, and poetry from the late 1800s to today to explore the intersections of women, sport, and the body in literature. This course is ideal for students studying literature, gender, and various facets of physical education, sport, health, and human development. Texts may include: A WHOLE OTHER BALL GAME: WOMEN'S LITERATURE ON WOMEN'S SPORT, AROUND THE WORLD ON TWO WHEELS, WHEEL WITHIN A WHEEL, SWIMMING TO ANTARCTICA, CARRIE SOTO IS BACK, and GIRL RUNNER. Additionally, we will venture out of the classroom for some women's sports...maybe even play a little ourselves... and invite pro and semi-pro athletes in as guest speakers. This course satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement as well as an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; the Diversity, Inclusion, & Social Justice requirement; and a Women, Gender, & Society major and minor requirement. This course also satisfies the Diversity Literature requirement for English with Literature Emphasis and English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors as well as a 300-level elective for English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

361-L01
Shakespeare Gone Global
 
Blended
A. Muse
ENGL*Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 21960
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 212

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 212

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21960

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     English Early Literature Req.
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Muse

In his life Shakespeare most likely never left the shores of England. In his work, however, his imagination roamed widely, exploring the theological and monarchical conflicts around Europe, the multicultural city of Venice, and fears and fantasies of Africa, the Mediterranean, and the New World. In the centuries since his death, Shakespeare’s plays have ventured from London’s Globe Theatre to circumnavigate the globe in dramatic, literary, and cinematic adaptations from nearly every nation. We will read several of the plays, discussing them within the global context of Shakespeare’s day, will watch contemporary global retellings of the plays, and will create our own Shakespearean adaptations. Application has been made to have this course satisfy an Integrations in the Humanities requirement and the Global Perspectives requirement (approval likely, but not guaranteed). This course also satisfies the Early British Literature and Context and Convergences distribution requirements for English with Literature Emphasis majors, a literature requirement for English with Creative Writing Emphasis and English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors, a requirement for English with Secondary Education majors, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. In addition it also satisfies both an Integrations in the Humanities and a Global Perspectives requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

FILM: Film Studies

300-01
World Cinema
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
V. Solachau-Chamutouski
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/5
Lecture
CRN 20562
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 5
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 207

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 207

     

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 20562

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Valentin Solachau-Chamutouski

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

300-02
World Cinema
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
V. Solachau-Chamutouski
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/1
Lecture
CRN 21676
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 207

     

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 21676

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Valentin Solachau-Chamutouski

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

300-L03
World Cinema
 
MW 3:40 pm - 5:15 pm
J. Snapko
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/3
Lecture
CRN 22602
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:40 pm
5:15 pm
BEC LL19

 

3:40 pm
5:15 pm
BEC LL19

       

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 22602

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL19
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  James Snapko

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

300-W04
World Cinema
 
Online
V. Solachau-Chamutouski
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/44
Lecture
CRN 22603
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 44
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 22603

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Valentin Solachau-Chamutouski

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

HIST: History

226-01
Modern Europe since 1914
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
Z. Nagy
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 05/19
16/16/4
Lecture
CRN 22647
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 4
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 481

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 481

     

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 22647

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 481
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Zsolt Nagy

This course is a close examination of twentieth century European history or, as some historians refer to it, the "short twentieth century" of the "dark continent." It follows the cultural, social, economic, and political development of Europe through wars and reconstruction. Topics include, but are not limited to, imperial and national rivalry, WW I and its aftermath, Russian Revolution, Fascism and Nazism, WW II and its aftermath, Cold War and the division of Europe, 1989, and the emergence of the European Union.

4 Credits

228-01
Environmental History
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Hausmann
FAPXSUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
16/17/13
Lecture
CRN 22648
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 13
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

       

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 22648

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steve Hausmann

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

4 Credits

293-01
Topics: Modern Iran/Iraq
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Ahmadi
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
16/13/0
Lecture
CRN 22712
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305J

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305J

     

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 22712

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305J
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sarah Ahmadi

Iran and Iraq, two neighboring countries in the Middle East, have shared much, culturally and demographically, through the centuries. Both experienced British intervention, oppressive regimes, and the mixed consequences of oil-rich economies. By following the course of nineteenth- and twentieth-century histories, we chart the tensions that led to the political resurrection of Shiism, a sect within Islam, and the causes of the Iran-Iraq War (1980-88), which cost hundreds of thousands of lives. This is an interdisciplinary course that especially draws from film studies, comparative literature, political science, and anthropology.

4 Credits

HONR: Honors

481-01
HONORS Who Belongs?
 
See Details
R. Buhr
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/15/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 22366
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 118

     

Subject: Honors (HONR)

CRN: 22366

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: McNeely Hall 118
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Renee Buhr, Ashley Shams

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

481-L02
HONORS At the Heart of Time
 
See Details
O. Itkin
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/15/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 22367
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

9:55 am
11:35 am
BEC LL03

     

Subject: Honors (HONR)

CRN: 22367

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL03
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ora Itkin, Stephen Laumakis

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

481-03
HONORS Art for Social Justice
 
See Details
M. Klein
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/18/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 22368
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
ASC

       

Subject: Honors (HONR)

CRN: 22368

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: Anderson Student Center

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein, Damon Shoholm

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

JOUR: Journalism/Mass Comm

372-W01
Environmental Journalism
 
TR 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
M. Neuzil
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22426
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
OEC 305

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
OEC 305

     

Subject: Journalism/Mass Comm (JOUR)

CRN: 22426

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 305
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Neuzil

This course focuses on mediated information about the environment, the environmental movement and its issues. Students will examine what makes (and what has made) the environmental journalism of today, beginning with early journalistic influences such as found in ancient texts to more current writing about agriculture, nature, science, outdoor adventures, and journalism from points of view.

4 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

280-W01
Active Nonviolence
 
MW 9:55 am - 11:35 am
O. Okoi
CoreFAPXSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 20245
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 20245

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Obasesam Okoi

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W02
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
CoreFAPXSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/21/3
Lecture
CRN 22678
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305K

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305K

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 22678

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305K
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

296-01
Social Change for Climate Just
 
See Details
A. Finnegan
CoreSCCGSUST 
01/30 - 05/19
25/21/0
Lecture
CRN 22869
2 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 308

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 22869

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan, Irene Domingo Sancho

In this course we seek to explore the connections between the climate crisis and social justice. We not only cultivate an analysis of the ecological crisis, its causes and consequences, but also present students an opportunity to explore the myriad of ways in which people are already working together in Minnesota and beyond to build a livable present and future.

2 Credits

MUSC: Music Classes (UG)

230-W01
Music of the United States
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Schmalenberger
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/2
Lecture
CRN 21477
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
BEC LL03

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
BEC LL03

     

Subject: Music Classes (UG) (MUSC)

CRN: 21477

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL03
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Human Well-Being
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sarah Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

4 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

220-01
Logic
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
S. Menssen
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 20166
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 20166

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sandra Menssen

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

221-01
Critical & Inductive Reasoning
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. Stoltz
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21991
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 108

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 108

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 108

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21991

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 108
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jonathan Stoltz

Drawing on insights from philosophy as well as research from cognitive science, psychology, and behavioral economics, this course aims to help students learn to reason better. Emphasis is on inductive and probabilistic reasoning rather than on deductive logic (which is the focus in PHIL 220). Possible topics covered include cognitive biases to which humans are naturally subject, intellectual virtues that promote the attainment of truth, the nature of evidence, the assessment of the quality of an information source, inference to the best explanation, probabilistic reasoning, and decision-making under uncertainty and risk. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Blended
G. Frost
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/7
Lecture
CRN 21562
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 7
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

N/A
N/A
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21562

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-01
Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity
 
Blended
G. Frost
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
5/5/1
Lecture
CRN 22438
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

N/A
N/A
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22438

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197, and 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

235-01
Politics Law & Common Good
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
26/26/2
Lecture
CRN 21219
4 Cr.
Size: 26
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21219

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

Who has the authority to makes laws? What makes for good law? What is the connection between your earlier exploration in The Person and the Good, and these questions? What is justice? Can there be such a thing as private property? How are these ideas related to “the common good” that we keep hearing so much about? What notions of authority and justice have, in the real world, led to oppression and misery rather than human happiness? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on these topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-02
Sig.Wk:Politics Law CommonGood
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Heaney
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
4/4/0
Lecture
CRN 22584
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22584

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Heaney

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

241-01
Hist. & Philosophy of Medicine
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
P. Distelzweig
BUHCCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 21220
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 207

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21220

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Busn Healthcare Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

Develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease, and health care. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

245-01
Philosophy of Art and Beauty
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
30/29/1
Lecture
CRN 21503
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21503

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

What does it mean for something to be beautiful? Is beauty an objective property of things or is it entirely in the eye of the beholder? Are perceiving beauty, making beautiful things, and being beautiful essential to a flourishing human life? Should beauty be any more important to us than other aesthetic qualities like elegance, ugliness, horror, or being cool? What does it take for something to be a work of art? Do the answers to any of these questions have anything to do with God? In this class, we’ll talk about these questions and about some ways that philosophers have answered them. We’ll spend time discussing views from the ancient and medieval Catholic philosophical tradition. But we’ll spend most of the class discussing modern views, including some views on beauty and art from Indian and Japanese philosophy. Along the way, we’ll listen to some musical pieces, watch some films, and view some paintings that will help us better think about beauty and art. Our goal will be to come to a deeper appreciation of beauty and of its central role in a happy human life. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-03
Sig.Wk: PhilosophyArt & Beauty
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
0/0/0
Lecture
CRN 22440
4 Cr.
Size: 0
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC LL62

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22440

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

What does it mean for something to be beautiful? Is beauty an objective property of things or is it entirely in the eye of the beholder? Are perceiving beauty, making beautiful things, and being beautiful essential to a flourishing human life? Should beauty be any more important to us than other aesthetic qualities like elegance, ugliness, horror, or being cool? What does it take for something to be a work of art and does it have anything to do with beauty? Do the answers to any of these questions have anything to do with God? In this class, we’ll talk about these questions and about some ways that philosophers throughout history have answered them. We’ll start by discussing some views from the ancient and medieval Catholic philosophical tradition. But we’ll spend most of the class discussing contemporary views, including those from non-European traditions. Along the way, we’ll listen to some musical pieces, watch some films, and view some paintings that will help us better think about beauty and art. Our goal will be to come to a deeper appreciation of beauty and of its central role in a happy human life. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

255-01
Technology and Ethics
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
M. Winter
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
28/28/0
Lecture
CRN 21994
4 Cr.
Size: 28
Enrolled: 28
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21994

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-04
Sig.Wk.: Technology & Ethics
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
M. Winter
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
2/2/1
Lecture
CRN 22442
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 206

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22442

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

255-40
HONR: Technology and Ethics
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
M. Winter
HonorCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 21995
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 206

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 206

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
MHC 206

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21995

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

An application of concepts and principles in philosophical ethics to issues raised by modern technology. Technologies whose ethical use may be considered include: Information Technologies, Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Synthetic Genomics and Artificial Life, Reproductive Technologies, Biomedical and Therapeutic Technologies, Human Enhancement Technologies, Agricultural Technologies, and Environmental Technologies. Special attention will be paid to the application of moral concepts and principles from Catholic intellectual tradition in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197, and Honors.

4 Credits

258-01
Environmental Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
27/24/0
Lecture
CRN 20950
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 20950

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

A consideration of the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment, including inquiry into the scope and justification of our obligations concerning the environment. Possible topics include: the question of who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration, animal welfare, species preservation, conservation, climate change, environmental racism, population pressure, sustainability, and what it means to say that human beings are charged with the care of Creation. Special attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within Catholic intellectual tradition, in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-05
Sig.Wk.: Environmental Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
3/3/0
Lecture
CRN 22439
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22439

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

A consideration of the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment, including inquiry into the scope and justification of our obligations concerning the environment. Possible topics include: the question of who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration, animal welfare, species preservation, conservation, climate change, environmental racism, population pressure, sustainability, and what it means to say that human beings are charged with the care of Creation. Special attention will be given to reflection on these topics from within Catholic intellectual tradition, in dialogue with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-D8
Sig.Wk.: Philosophy of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Rota
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
1/0/0
Lecture
CRN 22586
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22586

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. We will also briefly explore work from contemporary analytic philosophers on the fine-tuning argument, reformed epistemology, the problem of evil, and Pascal’s Wager. The mode of instruction will alternate between seminar-style discussion (on Tuesdays) and Socratic lecture (on Thursdays). Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

460-D2
Philosophy of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Rota
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/13/0
Lecture
CRN 21987
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21987

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

Natural theology is the project of arguing for the existence of God, and uncovering as much as possible about God’s nature, without relying on any putative supernatural revelation – instead relying on natural reason alone. In this course we will take a deep dive into the natural theology of St. Thomas Aquinas, by engaging in a close reading of Book 1 of his Summa contra Gentiles. We will also briefly explore work from contemporary analytic philosophers on the fine-tuning argument, reformed epistemology, the problem of evil, and Pascal’s Wager. The mode of instruction will alternate between seminar-style discussion (on Tuesdays) and Socratic lecture (on Thursdays). Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

301-D7
Sig.Wk.: Philosophy of God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
0/0/0
Lecture
CRN 22585
4 Cr.
Size: 0
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22585

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. In this course, we will consider some central issues in that discipline. The class will begin by discussing arguments for the existence of God and other ways in which we can naturally know God, especially perceiving God by perceiving beauty. Next, we will think about attributes of God that can be known by human reason, such as divine goodness, simplicity, and freedom. Finally, we will consider issues having to do with the relation between creatures and God, such as creation, conservation, providence, and predestination. We will read from Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae and from authors in the analytic, Reformed, Byzantine, and polytheistic traditions, as well as from those who object in various ways to theism. Writing a major paper and preparing for a public presentation will be a central focus of the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 365.

4 Credits

460-D1
Philosophy of God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/17/2
Lecture
CRN 21986
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21986

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. In this course, we will consider some central issues in that discipline. The class will begin by discussing arguments for the existence of God and other ways by which we can naturally know God. Next, we will think about attributes of God that can be known by human reason, such as divine goodness, simplicity, and freedom. Finally, we will consider issues having to do with the relation between creatures and God, such as creation, conservation, providence, and predestination. We will read from Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae and from authors in the analytic, Reformed, Byzantine, and polytheistic traditions, as well as from those who object to theism. Writing a major paper and preparing for a public presentation will be a central focus of the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 365

4 Credits

SPAN: Spanish

315-L01
Hispanic Linguistics
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
D. Tight
EdTrnCore 
01/30 - 05/19
24/15/0
Lecture
CRN 20585
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 203

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 203

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 203

   

Subject: Spanish (SPAN)

CRN: 20585

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Language/Culture

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Tight

An introduction to both contemporary and historical Hispanic linguistics. Descriptive Spanish phonetics and phonology. History of the Spanish language with emphasis on historical sound-change phenomena. Systematic study of dialectal variation in both Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 301 and 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course, (may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 305).

4 Credits

STCM: Strategic Communication

250-01
Science, Media & Social Impact
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Eichmeier
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
24/24/3
Lecture
CRN 22427
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 120

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 120

       

Subject: Strategic Communication (STCM)

CRN: 22427

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 120
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  April Eichmeier

This course will introduce students to foundational concepts in science and its social impacts through discussion of the scientific method, boundaries of science, media construction of science, and the contribution of science in trust building and decision-making in various contexts. The course is designed to help students gain understanding and knowledge of contextual factors that shaped science and the uneven impacts on traditionally marginalized groups. Coursework will help students develop diverse and critical perspectives of communication about science concerning marginalized communities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

200-L01
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
C. Anthony
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
5/5/0
Lecture
CRN 21398
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21398

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Cara Anthony

This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

223-L01
Belief: The Christian Story
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
C. Anthony
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/1
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 21397
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21397

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

205-L01
Old Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Niskanen
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
10/9/0
Lecture
CRN 20214
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 20214

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Paul Niskanen

This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

221-L01
Bible: Old Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Niskanen
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/1
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 21395
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21395

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

210-07
New Testament
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
D. Landry
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/5/0
Lecture
CRN 22358
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22358

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  David Landry

This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

221-07
Bible: New Testament
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
D. Landry
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 22404
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC LL62

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22404

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

221-05
Bible: Prophets & Common Good
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Pioske
FAPXJPMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
29/25/2
Topics Lecture 6
CRN 22401
4 Cr.
Size: 29
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 232

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 232

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 232

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22401

In Person | Topics Lecture 6

St Paul: McNeely Hall 232
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Daniel Pioske

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course examines the prophetic writings in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible by situating them in the historical settings in which they were written, being attentive to how these texts addressed issues of the common good in antiquity. This course then applies these insights to contemporary concerns of the common good today, asking where instances of prophetic activity, as understood in our course, may be currently present in our world, or where, perhaps, it is needed.

4 Credits

221-L02
Bible: Old Testament
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
P. Niskanen
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 21385
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC LL01

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21385

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

221-W03
Bible: Genesis & Human Nature
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
R. Dulkin
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/2
Topics Lecture 11
CRN 21386
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MCH 111

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MCH 111

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MCH 111

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21386

In Person | Topics Lecture 11

St Paul: McNeely Hall 111
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ryan Dulkin

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Genesis and Human Nature investigates the foundational narrative —the biblical story of Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden — as well as its “afterlife” in ancient Judaism, early Christianity, classical Islam, the European Renaissance and modernity. From these texts emerge key issues that frame the human experience: questions of human origins, humanity's place in the cosmos, constructions of gender, and perspectives on sin and punishment. Through engagement with these texts and concepts, students will wrestle with some of the core texts in the western tradition

4 Credits

221-04
Bible: New Testament
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
D. Landry
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
30/29/1
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 21373
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL01

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL01

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21373

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

221-06
Bible: Prophets & Common Good
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
D. Pioske
FAPXJPMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
30/20/0
Topics Lecture 6
CRN 22402
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 209

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 209

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 209

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22402

In Person | Topics Lecture 6

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Daniel Pioske

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course examines the prophetic writings in the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible by situating them in the historical settings in which they were written, being attentive to how these texts addressed issues of the common good in antiquity. This course then applies these insights to contemporary concerns of the common good today, asking where instances of prophetic activity, as understood in our course, may be currently present in our world, or where, perhaps, it is needed.

4 Credits

222-L02
History: Medieval Theology
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
S. McMichael
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/1
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 21391
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 205

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 205

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 205

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21391

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

223-L02
Belief: Ancient & Contemporary
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
D. Organ
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/12/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 21399
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 247

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21399

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Deborah Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need.

4 Credits

223-L04
Belief: Ancient & Contemporary
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
D. Organ
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/21/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 21456
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21456

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Deborah Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course either introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian teachings relate to each other and to other beliefs about the world, or it focuses on a particular teaching of the Church, such as Christ, salvation, or death and the afterlife. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant teachings in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. Special emphasis is given to the role of grace in history and human experience. All sections explore the ways in which Christian doctrine has influenced and been influenced by the culture in which it is lived, and the role that Christian teachings play in responding to social need.

4 Credits

224-W02
Bridges: Theo & Beauty
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. McInroy
MUMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/1
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 21410
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 207

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 207

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21410

In Person | Topics Lecture 8

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith.

4 Credits

452-W02
Theology & Beauty
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. McInroy
MUMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
5/5/1
Lecture
CRN 22357
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 207

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 207

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22357

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

  Mark McInroy

Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith.

4 Credits

224-L03
Bridges: Theo& Technology
 
Blended
B. Sain
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
26/26/0
Topics Lecture 13
CRN 21819
4 Cr.
Size: 26
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:30 pm
MHC 209

           
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21819

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 13

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Barbara Sain

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section examines how technology shapes our identities and our relationships with nature, other people, and the transcendent. Does technology bring us closer to the natural world or make it harder to experience it? Does it help or hinder our relationships with other people and with God? We’ll look at historical examples, such as the impact of electric lights, and current technologies, like virtual reality and prosthetic enhancements of the body. The course readings will include a range of voices from Christian theology, from ancient to modern times, that offer insight on sharing a meaningful human life with others and discerning the presence of the divine in work, leisure, silence, and the natural world.

4 Credits

489-L03
Topics: Theo & Technology
 
Blended
B. Sain
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
2/2/0
Lecture
CRN 21419
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:30 pm
MHC 209

           
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21419

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Barbara Sain

This section examines how technology shapes our identities and our relationships with nature, other people, and the transcendent. Does technology bring us closer to the natural world or make it harder to experience it? Does it help or hinder our relationships with other people and with God? We’ll look at historical examples, such as the impact of electric lights, and current technologies, like virtual reality and prosthetic enhancements of the body. The course readings will include a range of voices from Christian theology, from ancient to modern times, that offer insight on sharing a meaningful human life with others and discerning the presence of the divine in work, leisure, silence, and the natural world.

4 Credits

224-L06
Bridges: Theology &Environment
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
A. Levad
FAPXJPMRSUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/0
Topics Lecture 9
CRN 21403
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21403

In Person | Topics Lecture 9

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Levad

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems.

4 Credits

459-L06
Theology & Environment
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
A. Levad
FAPXJPMRSUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
10/6/0
Lecture
CRN 21402
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 204

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21402

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing to learn

  Amy Levad

This section examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems.

4 Credits

224-L41
HNRS Bridges: Theology&Beauty
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. McInroy
HonorMUMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
17/14/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 21814
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21814

In Person | Topics Lecture 8

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith. 

4 Credits

300-L41
HNRS Signature: Theo & Beauty
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. McInroy
HonorMUMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
3/2/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 21466
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 207

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21466

In Person | Topics Lecture 8

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Signature Work
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith. 

4 Credits

224-L42
HONORS Theology & Science
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Rolnick
HonorSMMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
8/7/0
Topics Lecture 6
CRN 21407
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 305I

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 305I

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21407

In Person | Topics Lecture 6

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305I
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Sci/Medicine/Soc Minor Approve
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Philip Rolnick

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section is an introduction to the interrelationship between Christian theology (the understanding of the Christian faith), and the natural sciences. It explores the relationship between scientific and theological methods and modes of knowledge, and considers some of the central topics of Christian theology - God, creation, providence, resurrections, and afterlife - in the light of modern scientific evidence and theories.

4 Credits

434-L42
HONORS Science & ChristianTheo
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Rolnick
HonorSMMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
12/2/0
Lecture
CRN 21405
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 305I

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 305I

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21405

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305I
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Sci/Medicine/Soc Minor Approve
     Writing to learn

  Philip Rolnick

This section is an introduction to the interrelationship between Christian theology (the understanding of the Christian faith), and the natural sciences. It explores the relationship between scientific and theological methods and modes of knowledge, and considers some of the central topics of Christian theology - God, creation, providence, resurrections, and afterlife - in the light of modern scientific evidence and theories.

4 Credits

225-W01
Faith & Ethics: Social Thought
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
B. Heidgerken
FAPXJPMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/15/1
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 21821
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MCH 118

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MCH 118

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MCH 118

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21821

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: McNeely Hall 118
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ben Heidgerken

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course considers the development and contemporary significance of Christian and Catholic social thought. Students study how Christian convictions have led to historic advances in the development of health care, social safety nets, just wages, labor unions, cooperatives, and environmental policy. Students bring Christian social thought into dialogue with a spectrum of historic social systems, from communitarian models to individualistic capitalism, and consider resources and challenges from the Christian tradition in creating a just social order.

4 Credits

225-L03
Faith & Ethics: Social Thought
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
B. Brady
FAPXJPMRCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 21412
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21412

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Bernard Brady

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section is for a cohort of students entering the Common Good Scholars program. Students will focus on theology's role in the formation of a social consciousness through class discussion and community engagement.

4 Credits

226-W01
Spirituality: Mysticism
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
F. Naeem
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
12/12/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 21473
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 209

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 209

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21473

In Person | Topics Lecture 8

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Fuad Naeem

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course will examine mysticism and its meanings in various religious and spiritual traditions, focusing on Islam and Christianity. We look at both the philosophical and practical dimensions of mystical traditions, discussing questions about the nature of reality, God, the universe, and the human self, as well as contemplative practices and spiritual experiences.

4 Credits

489-W01
Mysticism
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
F. Naeem
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
8/5/0
Lecture
CRN 21404
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 209

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 209

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21404

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Fuad Naeem

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course will examine mysticism and its meanings in various religious and spiritual traditions, focusing on Islam and Christianity. We look at both the philosophical and practical dimensions of mystical traditions, discussing questions about the nature of reality, God, the universe, and the human self, as well as contemplative practices and spiritual experiences.

4 Credits

226-W02
Spirituality:ChristianMarriage
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
P. Niskanen
FASTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
14/13/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 21818
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 150

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 150

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 150

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21818

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 150
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     Family Studies Approved
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

4 Credits

423-W02
Christian Marriage
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
P. Niskanen
FASTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
6/6/0
Lecture
CRN 21809
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 150

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 150

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
SCB 150

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21809

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 150
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     Family Studies Approved
     Writing Intensive

  Paul Niskanen

This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

4 Credits

226-W03
Spirituality:ChristianMarriage
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Twite
FASTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
9/9/1
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 21817
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 206

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 206

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21817

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     Family Studies Approved
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mary Twite

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

4 Credits

423-W03
Christian Marriage
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Twite
FASTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
12/12/0
Lecture
CRN 21811
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 206

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 206

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21811

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     Family Studies Approved
     Writing Intensive