Results

Enrollment and waitlist data for current and upcoming courses refresh every 10 minutes; all other information as of 6:00 AM.


Refine Search Results

AMCD: Amer Culture & Difference

200-L01
American Culture:Power/Identit
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Lawrence
AMCDCoreFAPXSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/22/0
Lecture
CRN 21167
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 222

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 222

       

Subject: Amer Culture & Difference (AMCD)

CRN: 21167

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Lawrence

In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course satisfies the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice core requirement and is a required course for students in the American Culture and Difference minor. Prerequisite: None

4 Credits

ARTH: Art History (UG)

202-L02
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/31
Lecture
CRN 21914
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 31
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 311

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 21914

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 311
     (Common Good capacity: 31 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

301-01
Signature Work: Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 22713
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 22713

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: In Person

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

ARTH 301 is a signature work course in art history.  Topics vary from section to section, but all art history Signature Work courses focus on interdisciplinary perspectives in the field of art history, the integration of learning, and the relevance of our work as art historians to the university’s mission. The various sections focus on an gaining an understanding of art through a careful exploration of the historical, social, and cultural context of its production. This course calls upon students to reflect on knowledge they have built throughout their academic careers and to explore and integrate their learning in an interdisciplinary fashion. Prerequisites: 4 credits in ARTH coursework and at least 80 credits completed by the start of the course

4 Credits

202-L01
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/25/21
Lecture
CRN 21913
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 21
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 311

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 21913

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 311
     (Common Good capacity: 31 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

BIOL: Biology

298-01
Born This Way?
 
See Details
J. Husak
EdTrnCoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
19/19/1
Lecture
CRN 21840
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

   

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 21840

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jerry Husak, Patricia Maddox

While discussions of gender and its social construction have become common in our culture, there is less discussion of whether there are actually binary “biological sexes'' that impact those conversations. In addition, while we have made many inclusive efforts in understanding the LGBTQIA+ community, our larger society correlates sexual orientation to biology, leaving us to ask: are queer folks born that way and does it stay fixed throughout our lives? This course explores the convergence of sociology and biology in how we define gender, sex, sexual orientation, and sexual behavior as continua instead of binaries as once previously believed. Topics are examined in developmental order from conception to adulthood and include current issues relevant to the LGBTQIA+ community and society at-large. The course also considers these topics in non-human animals to ask ‘what is normal?’ in nature.

4 Credits

474-D01
Biology of Global Health Sem
 
See Details
K. Okamoto
SUSTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 20651
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:55 pm
Online

           
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Biology (BIOL)

CRN: 20651

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kenichi Okamoto, Robert Wallace

This seminar, required for all senior Biology of Global Health majors, challenges students to examine the multiple aspects of global health in a unifying manner. In this seminar, students will integrate experiential learning with current research and broad applications of global health, and will complete a capstone project focusing on a global health issue. This senior capstone course allows students majoring in Biology of Global Health to analyze specific issues and problems using the knowledge and understanding gained by completing the other required courses in the program. This course does not fulfill the Biology B.A. or Biology B.S. requirement for a 400-level course. Prerequisite: Senior status as a declared Biology of Global Health major.

4 Credits

COMM: Communication Studies

328-D01
Comm of Race, Class & Gender
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Petersen
AMCDFAPXCoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/4
Lecture
CRN 21178
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 4
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 309

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 309

     

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 21178

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 309
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Debra Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities.

4 Credits

340-W01
Television Criticism
 
Online
P. Nettleton
AMCDCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/9
Lecture
CRN 21645
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 9
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 21645

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Pamela Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

4 Credits

340-W02
Television Criticism
 
Online
P. Nettleton
AMCDCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/6
Lecture
CRN 23044
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 6
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 23044

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Pamela Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

4 Credits

EDUC: Education (UG)

329-01
Diverse Learners & Families
 
MW 9:55 am - 11:35 am
C. Smith Kondo
FASTCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
25/24/0
Lecture
CRN 22533
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:55 am
11:35 am
MOH 318

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MOH 318

       

Subject: Education (UG) (EDUC)

CRN: 22533

In Person | Lecture

Minneapolis: Opus Hall - Minneapolis 318
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Chelda Smith Kondo

This course is designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, instructional practices, and dispositions to successfully manage diverse classrooms, using their understanding of multiple learning modalities and all types of diversity to promote all students' personal and academic achievement. The course engages candidates with issues such as race, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

201-W02
The American Short Story
 
Blended
K. Larson
AMCDCoreSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/6
Lecture
CRN 21964
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 6
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 209

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21964

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

201-W03
The American Short Story
 
Blended
K. Larson
AMCDCoreSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/9
Lecture
CRN 21965
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 9
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21965

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W02
Business & American Identity
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
D. Jones
CoreSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22521
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 227

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 227

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC 227

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22521

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Jones

This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W03
Sports and Social Justice
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
L. Wilkinson
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/2
Lecture
CRN 21971
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 212

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 212

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21971

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and a BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING anthology. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W04
Sports and Social Justice
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
L. Wilkinson
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21972
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 210

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 210

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21972

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and a BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING anthology. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

324-L01
Genre Study:African Amer Drama
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
ENGL*Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 21962
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 201

     

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 201

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21962

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     English Diversity Req.
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Penumbra Theatre Company has as its mission to present "artistically excellent productions that depict emotional, relevant, and valuable experiences from an African-American perspective." Despite social restrictions that created major barriers to its development, black theater companies like Penumbra fostered award-winning playwrights, actors, directors, choreographers, and designers. This course aims to explore some of those writers and productions, particularly those staged at Penumbra, and with some form of educational collaboration with Penumbra. Works may include a selection of the following: Lorraine Hansberry's A RAISIN IN THE SUN; Ntozake Shange's FOR COLORED GIRLS WHO HAVE CONSIDERED SUICIDE/WHEN THE RAINBOW IS ENUF; Charles Fuller's A SOLDIER'S PLAY; and one or more of August Wilson's plays, including GEM OF THE OCEAN, FENCES, and/or RADIO GOLF. This course satisfies BOTH an Integrations in the Humanities core requirement and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement In addition, this course satisfies an English Genre Studies requirement for both English with Literature Emphasis and English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors and a literature requirement for English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors. It also satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn Requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

337-L01
Latinx Literature
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
O. Herrera
FAPXLACMENGL*CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22297
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 317

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 317

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 317

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 22297

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 317
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     LatAm/Caribb Minor
     English Diversity Req.
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Olga Herrera

Science fiction, romance, political treatises, poetry, autobiography, historical fiction—these are all genres through which Latino, Latina, and Latinx writers have created literary worlds and expressed their hopes and desires for themselves and their communities. This course examines literature as a powerful means of expression and representation for one of the fastest growing populations in the US, and considers the impact of Latinx literature, art, film, and culture on US society. We will read authors from diverse Latinx backgrounds, including Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Victor LaValle, Erika Sanchez, Angie Cruz, Daisy Hernandez, Elizabeth Acevedo, Kali Fajardo-Anstine, as well as film and television by Gregory Nava, Robert Rodriguez, Tanya Saracho, and others. This course satisfies the following requirements: English with Literature Emphasis and English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors Human Diversity requirement; a Contexts and Convergences requirement for English with Literature majors; a 300-level elective course for English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors; an Integrations in the Humanities core requirement; a Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice core requirement, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

341-L01
Women, Sport, & the Body
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
L. Wilkinson
FAPXENGL*CoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/2
Lecture
CRN 21970
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 227

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 227

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 21970

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     English Diversity Req.
     Writing to learn
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

This course uses literature to investigate how female athletes use their sport and their bodies to fight for women's rights and to change our world. In 1894-1895, Annie Londonderry biked around the world and spoke out for equality. Frances Willard advocated for the eight-hour workday, equal pay for women, and suffrage, then learned to ride a bike at age 53, and wrote about the freedom biking gave to women. In the winter of 1912 in New York, women walked 170 miles in Suffrage Hikes advocating for their right to vote. These women paved the way for athlete-authors such as Lynne Cox (who held the world record for swimming the English Channel) and Maxine Kumin (who, along with being U.S. Poet Laureate and a Pulitzer Prize winner, was a collegiate swimmer and rower). These and other great women writers explore their sports and their bodies in ways that both reflect and contest societal restrictions and expectations. This course will use their texts and other essays, articles, short stories, novels, and poetry from the late 1800s to today to explore the intersections of women, sport, and the body in literature. This course is ideal for students studying literature, gender, and various facets of physical education, sport, health, and human development. Texts may include: A WHOLE OTHER BALL GAME: WOMEN'S LITERATURE ON WOMEN'S SPORT, AROUND THE WORLD ON TWO WHEELS, WHEEL WITHIN A WHEEL, SWIMMING TO ANTARCTICA, CARRIE SOTO IS BACK, and GIRL RUNNER. Additionally, we will venture out of the classroom for some women's sports...maybe even play a little ourselves... and invite pro and semi-pro athletes in as guest speakers. This course satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement as well as an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; the Diversity, Inclusion, & Social Justice requirement; and a Women, Gender, & Society major and minor requirement. This course also satisfies the Diversity Literature requirement for English with Literature Emphasis and English with Professional Writing Emphasis majors as well as a 300-level elective for English with Creative Writing Emphasis majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

FILM: Film Studies

298-L01
Topics: Race & Rep in US Film
 
Blended
K. Chowdhury
AMCDCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 22601
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 246

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 22601

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kanishka Chowdhury

In this course we will pay special attention to issues of race, gender, class, and sexuality, exploring ways in which representations are connected to our understanding of systems of power. In general, we will try and consider the complex constructions of “race” in American film and culture, as well as address the following questions. How has the category of “race” been historically constructed and represented? Whose interests have these constructions served? Why are these dominant representations often so far removed from the “real” way in which people live their lives? How are these representations connected to the ways in which we continue to think about race? How do writers and filmmakers resist dominant representations of race in the present, creating complex and liberating ways to rethink race? Some of the films we will study include Charles Burnett’s Killer of Sheep (1978), Ryan Coogler’s Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (2022), Cherien Dabis’s Amreeka (2009), Aurora Guerrero’s Mosquita y Mari (2012), Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989), Georgina Lightning’s Older Than America (2008), Oscar Micheaux’s Within Our Gates (1920), and Lulu Wang’s The Farewell (2019).

4 Credits

HIST: History

228-01
Environmental History
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Hausmann
FAPXSUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
16/17/13
Lecture
CRN 22648
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 13
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 247

       

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 22648

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steve Hausmann

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

4 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

280-W01
Active Nonviolence
 
MW 9:55 am - 11:35 am
O. Okoi
CoreFAPXSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 20245
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 209

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 20245

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Obasesam Okoi

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

280-W02
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Klein
CoreFAPXSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
20/21/3
Lecture
CRN 22678
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305K

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 305K

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 22678

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305K
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mike Klein

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

296-01
Social Change for Climate Just
 
See Details
A. Finnegan
CoreSCCGSUST 
01/30 - 05/19
25/21/0
Lecture
CRN 22869
2 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 308

       

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 22869

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan, Irene Domingo Sancho

In this course we seek to explore the connections between the climate crisis and social justice. We not only cultivate an analysis of the ecological crisis, its causes and consequences, but also present students an opportunity to explore the myriad of ways in which people are already working together in Minnesota and beyond to build a livable present and future.

2 Credits

355-D01
Public Policy Analysis & Advoc
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
O. Okoi
FAPXCGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 20484
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 206

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 206

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 20484

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Obasesam Okoi

In this class students will investigate how and why particular policies are developed, proposed, adopted, and implemented; will explore how social values shape and impact public policies; and will learn how to frame issues in ways that allow for more effective advocacy. The class will examine the relative power of diverse corporate and non-profit sectors in influencing policy debates and outcomes, including the role of think tanks. Students will analyze the limitations and strengths of diverse approaches to advocacy ranging from third-party appeals and solidarity efforts to elite decision makers, as well as the prospects for a politics of agency rooted in citizen-centered politics in which people mobilize to meet the needs of their communities. The course will integrate basic theory, interaction with public policy analysts and advocates, personal experience in persuasive advocacy, and case studies focused on issues such as climate change, economic inequality, land-food-hunger, and approaches to health care. Assignments will introduce students to various tools for persuasive advocacy and allow them to develop skill sets for using them.

4 Credits

375-D01
Conflict Analysis & Transform
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Finnegan
FAPXCore 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 21328
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305K

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 305K

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 21328

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305K
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

An introduction to issues surrounding conflict and the resolution of conflict in today's world focusing primarily on its contextual manifestation at the international, regional and intrastate levels. The course will explore important structural, social and psychological explanations of conflict. Attention will be given to ethnic and nationalist themes surrounding conflicts and their resolution at the intrastate and international levels. The course will examine how different types of intervention affect conflicts (the media, force, other types of third party intervention). Effective methods that foster an environment conducive to resolving or managing disputes will be studied. As part of the final task, the course will critically study how institutions such as power-sharing arrangements, federalism, and the rule of law figure into establishing a lasting basis for peaceful co-existence. For Justice and Peace Studies majors doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, the course will complement JPST 370 Conflict Mediation, but there are no prerequisites and the course is open to students in other majors.

4 Credits

MGMT: Management

384-L01
Project Management
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
E. Owens
CGoodCore 
01/30 - 05/19
35/35/1
Lecture
CRN 22175
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 35
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 115

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 115

     

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22175

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 115
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ernest Owens

Registration Note: A portion of seats in this course are reserved for students majoring in leadership and management. This course presents the concepts, techniques, and behavioral skills needed for managing projects effectively. The course introduces students to a project's life cycle (from project definition and goals to completion of the project) and the behavioral dynamics that need to be managed to achieve success. Project leaders need to fulfill multiple roles on a project including managing the timeline, meeting project specifications, resource budgeting and creating a sustainable project culture. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; and OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; and Junior standing.

4 Credits

385-01
Inclusive Leadership
 
TR 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
K. Donnelly
Core 
01/30 - 03/17
35/34/1
Lecture
CRN 22176
2 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 34
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 03/17
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 110

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 110

     

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22176

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 110
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kris Donnelly

Registration Note: A portion of seats in this course are reserved for students majoring in leadership and management. Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

2 Credits

385-02
Inclusive Leadership
 
TR 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
K. Donnelly
Core 
03/27 - 05/19
35/35/0
Lecture
CRN 22177
2 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 35
Waitlisted: 0
03/27 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 110

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 110

     

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 22177

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 110
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kris Donnelly

Registration Note: A portion of seats in this course are reserved for students majoring in leadership and management. Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

2 Credits

MKTG: Marketing

488-01
Multicultural & Inclusive Mktg
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
J. Purvis
Core 
03/27 - 05/19
35/25/0
Lecture
CRN 22244
2 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
03/27 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 110

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 110

       

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 22244

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 110
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Joelle Allen Purvis

The purpose of this course will be to help you appreciate the presence and understand the nuisances and similarities of various subcultures within the United States. From targeting and segmenting customers to developing partnerships, we will discuss how these may impact American marketing practices and trends. Realizing that a subculture is any group that shares a set of attitudes, values and goals, this course will consider not only ethnic subcultures but religious, sexual orientation & gender identity, ability, and generational subcultures. You will be exposed to concepts such as cultural capital, intercultural penetration, intersectionality, historical context and other concepts of culture and identity as you learn how you and organizations can effectively and responsibly engage with multiple diverse stakeholders. Prerequisite: MKTG 200 This MKTG 488 course fulfills DISJ Flag

2 Credits

MUSC: Music Classes (UG)

230-W01
Music of the United States
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
S. Schmalenberger
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
20/20/2
Lecture
CRN 21477
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 2
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
BEC LL03

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
BEC LL03

     

Subject: Music Classes (UG) (MUSC)

CRN: 21477

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL03
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Human Well-Being
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sarah Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

4 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
Blended
G. Frost
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
15/15/7
Lecture
CRN 21562
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 7
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

N/A
N/A
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 21562

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197.

4 Credits

301-01
Sig.Wk:Disability&HumanDignity
 
Blended
G. Frost
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
5/5/1
Lecture
CRN 22438
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

N/A
N/A
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 22438

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 75 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisite: PHIL 110 or PHIL 115 or PHIL 197, and 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

POLS: Political Science

302-01
Women and Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. High-Pippert
FAPXEdTrnCoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
25/24/0
Lecture
CRN 22576
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 414

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 414

     

Subject: Political Science (POLS)

CRN: 22576

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Angela High-Pippert

An examination of the political involvement of women in the United States, including the representation of women, feminism as a social movement, the campaign strategies and styles of women candidates, the election of women to local, state, and national office, and the impact that women make in public office. Differences between women’s and men’s political lives and differences among women will also be explored. Potential explanations for the political underrepresentation of women will be evaluated. Prerequisite: POLS 205 or permission of the instructor.

4 Credits

SOCI: Sociology

280-01
Hate Crimes
 
Blended
J. Hodge
CGoodCoreSCCG 
01/30 - 05/19
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 21663
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 308

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Sociology (SOCI)

CRN: 21663

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jessica Hodge

Although hate crimes have long existed in the United States, the term "hate crime" is a relatively new addition to the social, political, and legal domains. This course examines the institutionalization of hate crime law within our legal system and explores the complexities surrounding the development and enforcement of hate crime laws. This course also examines the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes, and the effectivess of formal and informal social controls in combating these crimes.

4 Credits

298-01
Born This Way?
 
See Details
P. Maddox
EdTrnCoreWMST 
01/30 - 05/19
11/12/1
Lecture
CRN 22703
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 1
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 207

   

Subject: Sociology (SOCI)

CRN: 22703

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Patricia Maddox, Jerry Husak

While discussions of gender and its social construction have become common in our culture, there is less discussion of whether there are actually binary “biological sexes'' that impact those conversations. In addition, while we have made many inclusive efforts in understanding the LGBTQIA+ community, our larger society correlates sexual orientation to biology, leaving us to ask: are queer folks born that way and does it stay fixed throughout our lives? This course explores the convergence of sociology and biology in how we define gender, sex, sexual orientation, and sexual behavior as continua instead of binaries as once previously believed. Topics are examined in developmental order from conception to adulthood and include current issues relevant to the LGBTQIA+ community and society at-large. The course also considers these topics in non-human animals to ask ‘what is normal?’ in nature.

4 Credits

SOWK: Social Work (UG)

240-01
People & Environment: Theories
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
D. Riley
SUSTCore 
01/30 - 05/19
35/19/0
Lecture
CRN 21168
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 110

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 110

     

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 21168

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 110
     (Common Good capacity: 56 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Darlene Riley

This a theory-driven course focusing on metacognition- training students to think about the way we think. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach to theoretical knowledge, introducing students to many ways of understanding how humans behave in, impact, and are impacted by multiple environments. Students learn to apply theories to understand human behavior in regard to their social and natural environments as well as reciprocal impact of humans and their environments. Theories are examined through a multidimensional framework constituting biological, psychological, spiritual, socio-cultural, political, environmental, and economic factors. Emphasis is on these factors within and between multiple systems: individual, family, small group, organization, community, and society, including political, economic, and natural systems. The course consists of five modules: interpersonal relations and empowerment, social systems, political and economic systems, social and environmental justice, and multiculturalism. The course investigates the multiple dimensions and intersections of diversity including gender, race/ethnicity, age, religion, ability, sexual orientation, nationality, and global and international perspectives. Students leave the class with a holistic understanding of the human experience within the environments that surround them. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent registration: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number); Required Prerequisites: PSYC 202, or consent of the program director. 

4 Credits

STCM: Strategic Communication

250-01
Science, Media & Social Impact
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Eichmeier
Core 
01/30 - 05/19
24/24/3
Lecture
CRN 22427
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 3
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 120

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
SCB 120

       

Subject: Strategic Communication (STCM)

CRN: 22427

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 120
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  April Eichmeier

This course will introduce students to foundational concepts in science and its social impacts through discussion of the scientific method, boundaries of science, media construction of science, and the contribution of science in trust building and decision-making in various contexts. The course is designed to help students gain understanding and knowledge of contextual factors that shaped science and the uneven impacts on traditionally marginalized groups. Coursework will help students develop diverse and critical perspectives of communication about science concerning marginalized communities. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

228-L05
Comparative:InterRel Encounter
 
Online
H. Gustafson
FAPXCore 
01/30 - 05/19
30/31/15
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 21426
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 31
Waitlisted: 15
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21426

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 2

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Global Perspective
      AND Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Hans Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

4 Credits

229-L03
Professions: Faith & Law
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Spencer
CoreLSMRSCCGCGood 
01/30 - 05/19
19/19/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 22405
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC LL62

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22405

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Marguerite Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

4 Credits

300-D03
Signature: Faith & Law
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Spencer
CoreLSMRCGood 
01/30 - 05/19
5/5/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 21470
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC LL62

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 21470

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Signature Work
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Marguerite Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

4 Credits

436-L03
Chrstian Fath & Legal Profes
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
M. Spencer
LSMRCore 
01/30 - 05/19
3/3/0
Lecture
CRN 22731
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/30 - 05/19
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
JRC LL62

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 22731

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     Writing to learn

  Marguerite Spencer

If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized.

4 Credits


Advanced Search

Day(s) of the Week
Open/Closed Courses