⚠ ⚠ ⚠
Pay close attention to the listed course modality. If you sign up for a course listed as In-Person (INP) or Blended (BLEN) you will be expected to attend class in person according to the class schedule. If conditions related to the COVID-19 pandemic makes changes to course modality necessary after your registration occurs, these changes will be communicated in advance whenever possible, accompanied by resources for student support.
⚠ ⚠ ⚠

Results

Enrollment and waitlist data for current and upcoming courses refresh every 10 minutes; all other information as of 6:00 AM.


Refine Search Results

ACCT: Accounting

410-01
Advanced Accounting
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
O. Asdemir
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
35/18/0
Lecture
CRN 43247
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 232

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 232

     

Subject: Accounting (ACCT)

CRN: 43247

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 232
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ozer Asdemir

The special accounting considerations of consolidated financial statements are considered in depth. Additional topics include foreign operations, partnerships, governments, and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisites: ACCT 312 and senior standing

4 Credits

BLAW: Business Law

320-L01
Compliance in Business Orgs
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Supina
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
35/15/0
Lecture
CRN 43282
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 115

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 115

       

Subject: Business Law (BLAW)

CRN: 43282

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 115
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stacey Supina

This course will examine the compliance function from a legal, ethical, functional and organizational perspective. It will consider the compliance function in contemporary business settings and industries, such as finance, health care, insurance, and retail. Practices of key regulatory agencies such as the Federal Trade Commission, Securities and Exchange Commission will be discussed along with contemporary regulatory statutes such as the FTC Act, Dodd-Frank, Sarbanes-Oxley, etc. The course will also examine key compliance processes and the means to ensure that compliance efforts are effective. Topics include audits and other internal governance approaches for discovering compliance problems in a timely fashion; investigations; reporting; mitigation; regulatory responses; and remediation. Prerequisites: BLAW 300, 301, 302, 303 or 304 and BETH 300 or BETH 301 and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

301-01
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Foote
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 41206
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 308

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 308

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 308

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 41206

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Foote

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

301-02
The Catholic Vision
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Foote
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
7/7/0
Lecture
CRN 43214
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
55S B10

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
55S B10

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
55S B10

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 43214

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall B10
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities AND Signature Work
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Foote

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

CISC: Computer & Info Sci (UG)

480-D01
Senior Capstone
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Hardt
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
26/21/0
Lecture
CRN 40153
4 Cr.
Size: 26
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OSS 434

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OSS 434

       

Subject: Computer & Info Sci (UG) (CISC)

CRN: 40153

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Science Hall 434
     (Common Good capacity: 38 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ryan Hardt

The senior capstone course provides computer science majors the opportunity to integrate the knowledge that they have gained from across the curriculum. Students will work in groups to design, document, and implement a large-sized software project. During this process, students will be exposed to programming team organization, software development practices, as well as tools that facilitate the development of software systems. Prerequisites: Senior standing and a minimum grade of C- or better in: CISC 350, CISC 340, and CISC 380 (which 380 may be taken concurrently)

4 Credits

ENGR: Engineering (UG)

480-01
Engineer Design Clinic I
 
See Details
T. Ling
CGoodCore 
09/07 - 12/21
125/94/0
Lecture
CRN 40851
4 Cr.
Size: 125
Enrolled: 94
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

2:55 pm
5:10 pm
OWS 150

 

2:55 pm
5:10 pm
OWS 150

       

Subject: Engineering (UG) (ENGR)

CRN: 40851

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Owens Science Hall 150
     (Common Good capacity: 144 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Tiffany Ling, Deb Besser, Heather Orser

Serves as the first capstone course. Student design teams, under the direction of a faculty coordinator, will develop engineering solutions to practical, open-ended design projects conceived to demonstrate the value of prior basic science and engineering courses. Ethical, social, economic and safety issues in engineering practice will be considered as well. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in either (ENGR 320, 350, 371, and 381) or (ENGR 331, 346, and 410) or (CISC 231, ENGR 345, and concurrent-registration in-or prior completion of-ENGR 431) or (ENGR 362, 364, and 368)

4 Credits

ENTR: Entrepreneurship

450-01
Entr:Management/Strategy
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Choe
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
24/9/0
Lecture
CRN 43343
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 106

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 106

       

Subject: Entrepreneurship (ENTR)

CRN: 43343

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 106
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Adam Choe

This is the Entrepreneurship Concentration capstone course. This course builds upon previous coursework, drawing together critical concepts including opportunity identification, business modeling, financial modeling, and market/industry research skills. Through lecture, case discussion, and extensive use of the Hotwash Process, students polish their critical thinking and creative problem solving skills. The primary deliverable is a Fundable Business Plan. Prerequisites: ENTR 100 or 200 or 260; and ENTR 250 or 350; and ENTR 370; and BUSN 202 or CISC 200 and 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

FINC: Finance

430-01
Financial Intermediaries
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
D. Vang
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
39/39/8
Lecture
CRN 43372
4 Cr.
Size: 39
Enrolled: 39
Waitlisted: 8
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 109

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MCH 109

       

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 43372

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 109
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

430-02
Financial Intermediaries
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
D. Vang
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
39/39/3
Lecture
CRN 43373
4 Cr.
Size: 39
Enrolled: 39
Waitlisted: 3
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MCH 109

           

Subject: Finance (FINC)

CRN: 43373

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 109
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Vang

Concepts, practices and organization for financial management of various financial intermediaries. Asset-liabilities management, duration, swaps, hedges and other concepts will be covered. Banks will be the primary area for study, but the course also will look at other institutions including insurance, funds and thrifts. The course will be based on text, lectures, guest speakers, computer modeling, a bank simulation and examination. Prerequisites: FINC 324 or FINC 325; ECON 251 and ECON 252; MATH 109 or 111 or 113; And 80 completed credits.

4 Credits

IDSC: Interdisciplinary (UG)

333-01
Liberal Arts Business Studies
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. MacKenzie
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
18/8/0
Lecture
CRN 41597
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 227

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 227

       

Subject: Interdisciplinary (UG) (IDSC)

CRN: 41597

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

In accord with the Renaissance Program's commitment to foster the integration of theoretical and practical learning, the design of this course is to promot the investigation of some theme or problem having a particularly interdisciplinary focus. This course will rely upon concepts and models stemming from both theoretical and practical sources in an attempt to further integrate aspects of these distinct branches of higher learning. Among the types of issues or topics that could fall within the scope of this course are: the meaning and value of work; the nature and place of technology; the relationship of individual to community; views of self - as worker and theoretician; models and parameters of authority. Prerequisites: 80 completed credits

4 Credits

JOUR: Journalism/Mass Comm

480-D01
Journalism and Media Ethics
 
TR 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
M. Neuzil
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
16/6/0
Lecture
CRN 40162
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
OEC 303

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
OEC 303

     

Subject: Journalism/Mass Comm (JOUR)

CRN: 40162

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 303
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Neuzil

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront professionals in journalism and other fields of mass media, and their audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair.

4 Credits

MGMT: Management

480-D01
Strategic Management
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Owens
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
35/30/0
Lecture
CRN 43410
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 115

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 115

     

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 43410

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 115
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ernest Owens

This course examines organizational issues from an integrative perspective. It draws on concepts from the entire business curriculum to view the organization as a whole. The focus of the course is to have you view the organization from the perspective of the president, rather than that of a manager of a particular function (e.g., VP of marketing). It examines the development of core competence and a sustainable competitive advantage as part of an organization's strategic planning process. Prerequisite: OPMT 300 or OPMT 310; FINC 310 or FINC 321; MGMT 200 or MGMT 305; MKTG 200 or MKTG 300; BETH 300 or BETH 301; and CISC 200 or BUSN 202; and senior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 480 may not receive credit for MGMT 395.

4 Credits

MKTG: Marketing

430-D01
Marketing Management
 
See Details
J. Al-Khatib
Core 
TBD
24/18/0
Lecture
CRN 43464
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

09/13 - 12/21:
9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

 

09/08:
9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 100

09/13 - 12/21:
9:55 am
11:35 am
In Person

     

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 43464

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 100
     (Common Good capacity: 96 participants)

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jamal Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

430-D02
Marketing Management
 
See Details
J. Al-Khatib
Core 
TBD
24/17/0
Lecture
CRN 43465
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

09/13 - 12/21:
1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

 

09/08:
1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 100

09/13 - 12/21:
1:30 pm
3:10 pm
In Person

     

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 43465

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 100
     (Common Good capacity: 96 participants)

St Paul: In Person

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jamal Al-Khatib

Small Business Institute clients present student teams with business problems that require solutions. Student teams diagnose the client’s problem and craft and present a solution to the client. Time is divided between reviewing and integrating the students’ marketing background, facilitating the student contact with the client, and providing consulting to the client. Prerequisites: MKTG 340; MKTG 370 (May be taken concurrently); one additional Marketing elective; BETH 300 or 301; BUSN 202 or CISC 200; and Senior standing

4 Credits

NSCI: Neuroscience

450-01
Integrative Neuroscience
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Westberry
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41652
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL45

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL45

     

Subject: Neuroscience (NSCI)

CRN: 41652

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL45
     (Common Good capacity: 22 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jenne Westberry

If we are to understand how behavior is guided by environmental cues, we must first understand how sensory information about the world is represented and processed in brain. In this seminar-style course, we will examine the neural organization of sensory systems, particularly the organization of cortical structures. We will first explore how various organizational strategies are used in different systems to perform specific functions, leading to the focus of our course: how information from different sensory modalities is integrated in higher-order cortical areas, and how this integration ultimately influences behavior. Prerequisite: C- or better in any two neuroscience elective courses or permission of the instructor and 80 completed credits

4 Credits

450-51
Integrative Neuroscience/LAB
 
M 1:30 pm - 5:30 pm
J. Westberry
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
12/10/0
Lab
CRN 41653
0 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:30 pm
5:30 pm
OWS 381

           

Subject: Neuroscience (NSCI)

CRN: 41653

In Person | Lab

St Paul: Owens Science Hall 381
     (Common Good capacity: 12 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jenne Westberry

If we are to understand how behavior is guided by environmental cues, we must first understand how sensory information about the world is represented and processed in brain. In this seminar-style course, we will examine the neural organization of sensory systems, particularly the organization of cortical structures. We will first explore how various organizational strategies are used in different systems to perform specific functions, leading to the focus of our course: how information from different sensory modalities is integrated in higher-order cortical areas, and how this integration ultimately influences behavior. Prerequisite: C- or better in any two neuroscience elective courses or permission of the instructor and 80 completed credits

0 Credits

PSYC: Psychology (UG)

422-01
History of Psych in Context
 
MW 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Johnson
EdTrnCore 
09/07 - 12/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 40947
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 209

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 209

       

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 40947

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

422-02
History of Psych in Context
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
A. Johnson
EdTrnCore 
09/07 - 12/21
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 41329
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 209

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 209

       

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 41329

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ann Johnson

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

422-03
History of Psych in Context
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Bremner
EdTrnCore 
09/07 - 12/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 42637
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 206

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 206

     

Subject: Psychology (UG) (PSYC)

CRN: 42637

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ryan Bremner

This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good." Prerequisites: Senior standing and declared Psychology major

4 Credits

SOCI: Sociology

480-W01
Seminar in Criminal Justice
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
J. Hodge
EdTrnCGoodCore 
09/07 - 12/21
20/22/1
Lecture
CRN 41089
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 1
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 140

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
SCB 140

     

Subject: Sociology (SOCI)

CRN: 41089

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 140
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jessica Hodge

The senior seminar serves as a capstone experience for students to address several central issues in the study of crime and justice. The major focus is to build upon students knowledge from previous courses with a focus upon an integration of knowledge from material learned throughout the major. Students will complete a final project that demonstrates an in-depth understanding of a criminal justice topic that could lead to future work in the criminal justice field. Prerequisite: SOCI 210 and 312 or permission of instructor

4 Credits

SOWK: Social Work (UG)

405-01
Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem I
 
M 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
E. Solomonson
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
11/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41756
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
SCB 130

           

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 41756

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 130
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Eva Solomonson

Senior Fieldwork complements the student’s academic work through practical experiences in a social work agency, institution or department. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns social work tasks and functions while applying theory to actual social work situations. Students participate in an on-campus seminar with other senior social work majors while in placement. The placement is approximately 15-20 hours per week throughout two consecutive terms (fall and spring semesters). Concurrent registration in SOWK 401 is required. SOWK 405 is the fall course.

4 Credits

405-02
Sr Field Pract & Integ Sem I
 
R 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
C. O'Neal
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
11/10/0
Lecture
CRN 41757
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
SCB 130

     

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 41757

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Summit Classroom Building 130
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Signature Work

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catrice O'Neal

Senior Fieldwork complements the student’s academic work through practical experiences in a social work agency, institution or department. Under the supervision of an agency field instructor, the student learns social work tasks and functions while applying theory to actual social work situations. Students participate in an on-campus seminar with other senior social work majors while in placement. The placement is approximately 15-20 hours per week throughout two consecutive terms (fall and spring semesters). Concurrent registration in SOWK 401 is required. SOWK 405 is the fall course.

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

224-W02
Bridges: Theology & Art
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
E. Gavrilyuk
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
16/14/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 42045
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 222

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 222

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 222

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 42045

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center 222
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors.

4 Credits

300-W04
Signature Work: Theology & Art
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
E. Gavrilyuk
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
4/3/0
Topics Lecture 16
CRN 43210
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 222

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 222

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
JRC 222

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43210

In Person | Topics Lecture 16

St Paul: John Roach Center 222
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities AND Signature Work
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors.

4 Credits

224-W04
Bridges: Theology & Art
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
C. Sautter
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
9/8/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 43820
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 246

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 246

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43820

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cynthia Sautter

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. This section will examine not only Christian theology and art, but also consider the arts in Judaism, Islam, Asian and African traditions. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, one Art History course.

4 Credits

300-W03
Signature Work: Theology & Art
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
C. Sautter
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
3/0/0
Topics Lecture 16
CRN 43209
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 246

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 246

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43209

In Person | Topics Lecture 16

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities AND Signature Work
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cynthia Sautter

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. This section will examine not only Christian theology and art, but also consider the arts in Judaism, Islam, Asian and African traditions.

4 Credits

453-W01
Theology & Art
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
C. Sautter
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
8/6/0
Lecture
CRN 43085
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 246

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 246

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43085

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Cynthia Sautter

Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. This section will examine not only Christian theology and art, but also consider the arts in Judaism, Islam, Asian and African traditions. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, one Art History course.

4 Credits

227-W01
Contexts: God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
C. Anthony
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
14/14/1
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 42007
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 1
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 42007

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course will explore various approaches to God and God's relationship to humankind, including perspectives written by people traditionally on the margins of theological research. A central question for this section will be how God responds to injustice. This course explores the role of scripture, history, tradition and experience in the understanding of God. It examines both old and new theologies, asking key theological questions such as, “What difference does it make how people picture God?” “How could a good God create a world where evil and suffering are possible?” or “If God has a plan for the world, are we free to make our own choices?”

4 Credits

300-W01
Signature Work: God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
C. Anthony
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
5/5/1
Topics Lecture 18
CRN 42062
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 1
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 42062

In Person | Topics Lecture 18

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
      AND Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This course will explore various approaches to God and God's relationship to humankind, including perspectives written by people traditionally on the margins of theological research. A central question for this section will be how God responds to injustice. This course explores the role of scripture, history, tradition and experience in the understanding of God. It examines both old and new theologies, asking key theological questions such as, “What difference does it make how people picture God?” “How could a good God create a world where evil and suffering are possible?” or “If God has a plan for the world, are we free to make our own choices?”

4 Credits

227-L02
Contexts: Justice & Peace
 
Online
C. Wyant
FAPXJPMRLACMPEMRCore 
09/07 - 12/21
13/13/20
Topics Lecture 14
CRN 42048
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 20
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 42048

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 14

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     LatAm/Caribb Minor
     Peace Engineering Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Carissa Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

4 Credits

300-L05
Signature Work:Justice & Peace
 
Online
C. Wyant
FAPXJPMRLACMPEMRCore 
09/07 - 12/21
17/17/1
Topics Lecture 14
CRN 43212
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 1
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43212

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 14

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
      AND Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     LatAm/Caribb Minor
     Peace Engineering Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Carissa Wyant

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section involves an examination of the views of various religions and ideologies on issues of justice and peace, with special attention to the Catholic and other Christian teachings on such issues as war and peace, violence, economic justice, the environment, criminal justice, and social justice. Special attention is given to how fundamental presuppositions and principles of each group studied affect their views on justice and peace, and contribute to or hinder dialogue and peaceful interaction with other groups. In addition to Christianity, students will study (at least) one far eastern worldview (e.g. Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism), one tribal religion (Native American, African), Islam, and one secular worldview (e.g. Marxism, capitalism, secular humanism). Students are required to investigate one worldview in depth through a semester-long research project.

4 Credits

300-D02
SignatureWork:Nazism&Apartheid
 
Online
K. Vrudny
Core 
09/07 - 12/21
30/24/0
Topics Lecture 12
CRN 43192
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
09/07 - 12/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 43192

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 12

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
      AND Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kimberly Vrudny

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. This section will focus on patterns that emerged in both contexts—Germany under Hitler; South Africa under apartheid: economic anxiety; the rise of nationalism; the election of a tyrant; theological rationales for tyranny, torture, and even genocide; theological and artistic resistance; the complicated role of Catholicism; and legal processes in the aftermath.

4 Credits


Advanced Search

Day(s) of the Week
Open/Closed Courses