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Pay close attention to the listed course modality. If you sign up for a course listed as In-Person (INP) or Blended (BLEN) you will be expected to attend class in person according to the class schedule. If conditions related to the COVID-19 pandemic makes changes to course modality necessary after your registration occurs, these changes will be communicated in advance whenever possible, accompanied by resources for student support.
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Results

Enrollment and waitlist data for current and upcoming courses refresh every 10 minutes; all other information as of 6:00 AM.


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ARHS: Art History (Grad)

597-01
Women in Ancient Art & Culture
 
Blended
M. Stansbury-O'Donnell
 
01/31 - 05/20
4/3/0
Lecture
CRN 29853
3 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 203

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (Grad) (ARHS)

CRN: 29853

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

ARTH: Art History (UG)

202-L01
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCoreCGood 
01/31 - 05/20
27/27/0
Lecture
CRN 29475
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
OEC 414

           

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 29475

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

202-L02
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCoreCGood 
01/31 - 05/20
27/27/0
Lecture
CRN 29476
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 414

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 29476

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

251-L01
Museum Studies: Practices
 
Blended
V. Rousseau
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
25/24/0
Lecture
CRN 28010
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online 1

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 311

     

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 28010

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 311
     (Common Good capacity: 31 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Vanessa Rousseau

This course provides an investigation of the critical issues facing museums in the 21st century. Museum missions, practices, and resources will be interwoven with a discussion of audience, communication, and collaboration. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

4 Credits

260-L01
Women in Ancient Art & Culture
 
Blended
M. Stansbury-O'Donnell
CLASCore 
01/31 - 05/20
25/24/0
Lecture
CRN 29481
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 203

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 29481

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Stansbury-O'Donnell

The history of the ancient world-its politics, philosophy, and literature is mostly silent or slanderous about the lives of women. In most times and places their role in public life and their ability to express themselves were severely circumscribed. However, a study of archaeological material, representations in art and literature, and the occasional writing of women themselves allows us to look behind the curtain that veiled their lives. This class will examine the evidence to reconstruct a picture of what the life of women was like in Egyptian, Greek, and Roman culture throughout the ancient Mediterranean.

4 Credits

304-01
Typeface Design
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
C. Eliason
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 29454
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 312

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 312

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 312

   

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 29454

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 312
     (Common Good capacity: 19 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Craig Eliason

This course focuses on the process of creating a digital typeface design. Students will invent a design brief—a description of the need that their font will serve—and then, letter by letter, create a typeface. Along the way, students will investigate the history of type design, reflect on both the functional and expressive aspects of type designs, and receive feedback on their work in progress. No previous experience is required.

4 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

205-01
Crisis and Development
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
R. Kennedy
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
25/27/0
Lecture
CRN 27568
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 27568

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

4 Credits

301-01
The Catholic Vision
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
B. Junker
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/12/0
Lecture
CRN 26541
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 26541

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

301-02
The Catholic Vision
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
B. Junker
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
5/9/0
Lecture
CRN 29692
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

       

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 29692

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities AND Signature Work
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

340-03
Chrch&Culture:Misn of Engineer
 
See Details
M. Naughton
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 29037
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
FDC 317

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
FDC 317

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 29037

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Facilities & Design Center 317
     (Common Good capacity: 46 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Naughton, Deb Besser

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

4 Credits

340-01
Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
R. Kennedy
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
25/14/0
Lecture
CRN 27909
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
55S 207

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
55S 207

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 27909

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

4 Credits

405-01
John Henry Newman
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
D. Deavel
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
25/26/0
Lecture
CRN 27675
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
55S 207

   

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 27675

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzmann Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Deavel

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons.

4 Credits

CLAS: Classical Civilization

225-W01
Classical Hero & Film
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Quartarone
CLASCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 29376
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 302

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 302

       

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 29376

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 302
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rina Quartarone

This Course focuses on analyzing and understanding Classical epic poetry, the ancient presentation of heroic figures and heroic exploits, and recognizing the influence of epic/heroic literature on the modern storytelling device of film. While the genre of epic is central to the course, other genres (both literary and cinematic) which present he-roic figures, e.g., tragedy, history, comedy, action, fantasy, will also be explored. Analyzing the works read or viewed via writing and class discussion will constitute the primary course activities; students will engage in reading, viewing and writing outside of class, while class time will include some writing, viewing and discussion. In order to allow am-ple time for discussion and analysis, the majority of films in their entirety will be viewed outside of class. The course grade will be based substantially on written analysis (i.e., essays, papers) of the texts and films studied. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

245-W01
Classical Mythology
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
L. Hepner
CLASCoreWMST 
01/31 - 05/20
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 27690
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 108

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 108

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 108

   

Subject: Classical Civilization (CLAS)

CRN: 27690

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 108
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing to learn
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

COMM: Communication Studies

370-01
Intercultural Communication
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
X. Guan
FAPXCoreWMST 
01/31 - 05/20
24/23/0
Lecture
CRN 27932
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 454

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 454

     

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 27932

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     WGSS Major Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Xiaowen Guan

This course examines the influence of culture on our own and others’ communication. Students will be introduced to different aspects and levels of culture, including basic principles and theories that explain cultural differences on the group level, and challenges in intercultural communication, such as stereotypes, ethnocentrism, conflicting ethical standards, and racial disparities. Through lectures, discussions and first-hand practice, students are expected to form global perspectives and become more competent in intercultural communication. Students are advised to take the course either during or after the sophomore year.

4 Credits

370-02
Intercultural Communication
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
X. Guan
FAPXCoreWMST 
01/31 - 05/20
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 29797
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 454

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 454

       

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 29797

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     WGSS Major Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Xiaowen Guan

This course examines the influence of culture on our own and others’ communication. Students will be introduced to different aspects and levels of culture, including basic principles and theories that explain cultural differences on the group level, and challenges in intercultural communication, such as stereotypes, ethnocentrism, conflicting ethical standards, and racial disparities. Through lectures, discussions and first-hand practice, students are expected to form global perspectives and become more competent in intercultural communication. Students are advised to take the course either during or after the sophomore year.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

201-W01
The American Short Story
 
Blended
K. Larson
AMCDCore 
02/28 - 03/06, 03/28 - 04/10, 04/11 - 04/17, 04/18 - 04/24, 04/25 - 05/01
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 28700
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/28 - 03/06, 03/28 - 04/10, 04/11 - 04/17, 04/18 - 04/24, 04/25 - 05/01
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

01/31 - 02/27:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

03/07 - 03/20:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

03/28 - 04/10:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

04/18 - 04/24:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

05/02 - 05/20:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

 

01/31 - 02/27:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

03/07 - 03/20:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

04/25 - 05/01:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

05/02 - 05/20:
8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 227

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28700

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

201-W02
The American Short Story
 
Blended
K. Larson
AMCDCore 
02/28 - 03/06, 03/28 - 04/10, 04/11 - 04/17, 04/18 - 04/24, 04/25 - 05/01
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 28712
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/28 - 03/06, 03/28 - 04/10, 04/11 - 04/17, 04/18 - 04/24, 04/25 - 05/01
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

01/31 - 02/27:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

03/07 - 03/20:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

03/28 - 04/10:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

04/18 - 04/24:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

05/02 - 05/20:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

 

01/31 - 02/27:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

03/07 - 03/20:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

04/25 - 05/01:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

05/02 - 05/20:
9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 227

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28712

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

201-W03
The Irish Memoir
 
See Details
D. Gardiner
Core 
02/14 - 05/20
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 28721
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/14 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 212

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 212

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28721

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Gardiner, James Rogers

What is your “Irish” story? Is it Vietnamese, African, Polish, German, American, etc.? These stories and more are an important part of the contemporary writings of Irish memoirists. In this course, we will read and reflect upon the rich and diverse tradition of first-person writing in one of Europe’s youngest political countries to perhaps understand expression and our worlds. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W01
To Heal: Literature & Medicine
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 28701
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 210

     

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 210

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28701

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

This course looks at physicians as writers, thinkers, practitioners, and subjects; we will study texts that offer reflections from a prominent surgeon on his craft in the work of Atul Gawande. We will also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care by examining how illness and caregiving are depicted in literary texts from several genres: fiction (NEVER LET ME GO), poetry (THE RESURRECTION TRADE), and drama (WIT and THE CLEAN HOUSE). What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? We will address these and other questions through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

202-W02
To Heal: Literature & Medicine
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 29028
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 210

     

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 210

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29028

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

This course looks at physicians as writers, thinkers, practitioners, and subjects; we will study texts that offer reflections from a prominent surgeon on his craft in the work of Atul Gawande. We will also explore historical, economic, political, and ethical questions related to medical care by examining how illness and caregiving are depicted in literary texts from several genres: fiction (NEVER LET ME GO), poetry (THE RESURRECTION TRADE), and drama (WIT and THE CLEAN HOUSE). What kinds of emotional and social costs does illness have? How do writers grapple with the moral dimensions of medicine? We will address these and other questions through close textual analysis and discussion; in addition, our course will draw upon the expertise of practitioners within the Minneapolis medical community. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

203-W01
Paranoid Fiction: Conspiracies
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
T. Dewey
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 29164
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 210

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 210

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 210

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29164

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Timothy Dewey

This course will examine the enduring appeal and growing influence of conspiracy theory in American political culture. We will look at key historical events, figures, and social issues in the history of our nation and the conspiracy theories they have spawned, as well as the psychological phenomena most commonly associated with conspiracies, and the rhetoric of political paranoia. The objective of the course is neither to promote nor debunk any particular theory, but to examine the role that conspiracy theories play as modern mythologies. Possible titles may include Jesse Walker’s THE UNITED STATES OF PARANOIA, Don DeLillo’s LIBRA, Ishmael Reed’s MUMBO JUMBO, Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward’s ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN, and Kurt Vonnegut’s JAILBIRD. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

203-W02
Order Up: Literature of Food
 
Blended
S. Scott
CoreCGood 
01/31 - 05/20
20/21/0
Lecture
CRN 29166
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 452

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 452

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online 1

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29166

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 452
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Shannon Scott

This course explores food as a cultural metaphor and a way to connect, create, and sustain family and community. It is also a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. In this class we question our assumptions about how food is grown, raised and prepared. What is organic? What is “junk”? Gourmet? Who decides? Who has access to “good food” in our country and in the world? Where and what are “food deserts”? There is also a community component, involving field trips to local eateries, work with BrightSide, and a drive for local food shelves. Fiction for this course may include work by Chitra Divakaruni, Ruth Ozeki, Laura Esquivel, and Simon Wroe. The texts, along with the issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political—i.e. essays by Michael Pollan and Vandana Shiva, poetic odes from The Hungry Ear, and personal memoirs of professional chefs. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

203-W03
Monsters & Horror in Lit
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
H. McNiel
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 29165
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 227

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 227

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 227

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29165

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 227
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather McNiel

Monster stories are well known for evoking an emotional rollercoaster of anticipation, fear, disgust, and sympathy. Add to this the supernatural and psychological dimensions of horror, and we have a winning recipe for both literary bestsellers and cinematic blockbusters. But what accounts for the popularity of monster narratives throughout history, and how did they become such a staple of popular culture today? What can the study of monsters reveal about their origins, significance, and relevance for us, as well for previous generations? In this course, we’ll examine some of the most influential and best-loved literary works featuring monsters, considering their literary, historical, psychological, and cultural significance. Texts may include FRANKENSTEIN, DRACULA, BEOWULF, as well as films and other media. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

203-W04
Gangsters, Geeks, & Spies
 
Blended
C. Santiago
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 28702
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 307

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online 1

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 307

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28702

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 307
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Santiago

This course explores fiction, music, poetry, video games, graphic novels, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian American culture. We’ll meet Amadeus Cho, a teenaged genius who also happens to be the next Incredible Hulk, and Maika Halfwolf, the steampunk heroine of the Image comic MONSTRESS. We’ll read FRESH OFF THE BOAT, the memoir of a one-time thug who conquers the foodie world, and play BUTTERFLY SOUP, an interactive game about four queer girls in the Bay Area who to happen to love baseball and each other. We’ll unpack hip-hop lyrics by M.I.A., and crack the cultural codes in the standup comedy of Ali Wong and in Aziz Ansari’s Emmy Award-winning MASTER OF NONE. And we’ll decipher the testimony of the captain in the best-selling novel THE SYMPATHIZER, an ex-soldier who describes himself as “a spy, a sleeper, a spook, a man of two faces.” The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W05
Summer Game: Baseball Lit
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Raimondi
CGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 29167
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 313

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
OEC 313

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29167

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 313
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Raimondi

Bernard Malamud (author of THE NATURAL) once wrote: "The whole history of baseball has the quality of mythology." This course will examine baseball literature as we read from a variety of writings about our baseball heroes, both the men and the women, who played the game that we call "our national pastime." We will look at our country's romanticism with baseball and how writers who wrote about it helped give the sport its mythological dimensions. Selections will include essays, short stories, and poetry by authors who loved the game. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W06
LGBTQ+ Literature
 
Blended
M. Hendrickx
AMCDCoreWMST 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 29169
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 210

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29169

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Melissa Hendrickx

This course will primarily focus on LGBTQ+ literature from the Stonewall riots to the present-day. We will investigate whether this genre of literature has a particular aesthetic or shares common thematic elements. Special attention will be given to BIPOC writers and how LGBTQ+ writing disrupts common conventions of gender, sexuality, relationships, and identity, and the role that storytelling has played in the queer community. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

212-L01
British Authors II
 
Blended
C. Craft-Fairchild
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 28707
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 307

     

9:35 am
10:40 am
OEC 307

   
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28707

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 307
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

How has the category of “English literature” expanded as a result of global changes over the nineteenth and twentieth centuries? How have authors responded to fundamental upheavals in the individual, religion, the British Empire, the role of women, and the value of poetry and art? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition from approximately 1789 to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as revolution and reform, authorship, war, nationality and race, and the relationships between literature and other arts. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190. 

4 Credits

215-L01
American Authors II
 
Blended
D. Jones
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 29168
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 212

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 212

       
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29168

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Jones

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190. 

4 Credits

294-W01
Writing Video Games
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Pane
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 29579
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

     

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29579

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Salvatore Pane

As video games have become increasingly complex, there’s a stronger need than ever for video game writers and narrative designers. But what is a narrative designer? In this course, students will study how professionals write video games and then attempt to do so themselves. Using a variety of simple-to-learn programs, students will collaborate in small development teams in addition to writing their own meaningful video games. Examples such as GONE HOME or UNDERTALE will be analyzed in class. Prerequisites: ENGL 121 or 190

4 Credits

365-L01
British Romantic Literature
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
Y. An
ENGL*CGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/14/0
Lecture
CRN 28718
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 212

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 212

       

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28718

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Context and Convergences
     English British Lit. Req.
     English Early Literature Req.
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Young-ok An

The Romantic Age (1789-1832) was one of the most intense periods of social change, including revolutions, wars, global migrations, and the blossoming of idealism. In this course, we will focus on Romantic texts that explore crossings of national borders and literary conventions. We will read William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lord Byron, Percy Shelley, John Keats, Mary Shelley, Felicia Hemans, and Letitia Landon, putting them in historical and interdisciplinary contexts. These authors gave us a revolutionary change in poetic language, a new definition of the poet, the first science fiction, the thrilling saga of the Byronic hero, and ecological advocacy against industrialization. The readings will help you deepen your knowledge of the Romantics’ rich and complex works and make connections across times and places: Blake inspired both The Doors and Allen Ginsberg; Byron made a lasting impact on the Greek independence movement; Percy Shelley championed the vegetarian movement as well as the Irish people; and Mary Shelley’s work ushered in the genre of science fiction and served as a source of endless inspiration to Hollywood. This class satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement, as well as an Early British Literature requirement and a Contexts and Convergences requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

390-L01
The Erdrichs: Native Amer Lit
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
L. Wilkinson
AMCDENGL*Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/17/0
Lecture
CRN 28720
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28720

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Context and Convergences
     English Diversity Req.
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

In this iteration of ENGL 390 Major Literary Figures, students will study the fiction, poetry, and essay writing of Louise Erdrich, winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize for her novels, and Heid Erdrich, winner of the American Book Award for her poetry. Louise and Heid, sisters, are members of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe, and are two of the most prominent American writers of our time. Likely texts to be examined include Tracks, The Last Report on the Miracles of Little No Horse, and The Night Watchman (winner of the Pulitzer) by Louise Erdrich, and National Monuments, Little Big Bully, and Sister Nations (an anthology of Native women’s writing) by Heid Erdrich (winner of the National Book Award). Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

FILM: Film Studies

300-L01
World Cinema
 
Online
J. Kroll
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
25/24/0
Lecture
CRN 27141
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 27141

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Juli Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

300-L02
World Cinema
 
Online
J. Kroll
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
25/25/0
Lecture
CRN 29205
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 29205

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Juli Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

300-L03
World Cinema
 
Online
J. Kroll
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
25/24/0
Online: Asynchronous
CRN 29790
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 29790

Online: Asynchronous

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Juli Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

300-04
World Cinema
 
Online
J. Kroll
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
30/29/0
Online: Asynchronous
CRN 29843
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 29843

Online: Asynchronous | Online: Asynchronous

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Juli Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

GSPA: Spanish (Grad)

541-01
Topics-Spanish for Professions
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Perez Castillejo
 
01/31 - 05/20
2/1/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 29427
3 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

       

Subject: Spanish (Grad) (GSPA)

CRN: 29427

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

  Susana Perez Castillejo

In this class, students will learn Spanish-language skills, cultural information, and communicational strategies needed in the professional fields in order to communicate with Spanish-speaking individuals competently and professionally. Emphasis is placed on specialized, advanced vocabulary building, role play, and an understanding of Hispanic cultures. Topics may include Spanish for law enforcement, social services, education, medicine, business, and communications.

3 Credits

HIST: History

349-01
History of Ottoman Empire
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Ahmadi
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
16/14/0
Lecture
CRN 29185
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 481

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 481

     

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 29185

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 481
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sarah Ahmadi

This course is a survey of the history of the Ottomans from its origins as a small medieval principality in Asia Minor to a major global power in the sixteenth century, and to its eventual disintegration by the end of World War I. The course will concentrate on the main political, social and cultural institutions of the Ottoman society, and how these changed over time. It will also introduce students to some of the major themes and recent trends in Ottoman historiography, including debates on the origins and decline of the Ottomans, the issue of Ottomans' legacy for the successor states, as well as the growing research on the formerly underrepresented groups such as women, minorities, etc. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

4 Credits

HONR: Honors

481-L02
HONORS Phil of Nature and Envr
 
See Details
M. Neuzil
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 29696
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 305J

         

Subject: Honors (HONR)

CRN: 29696

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305J
     (Common Good capacity: 56 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Neuzil, Stephen Laumakis

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

481-03
HONORS Humanity in Classics
 
See Details
I. Schrunk
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/13/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 29697
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 305J

     

Subject: Honors (HONR)

CRN: 29697

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 305J
     (Common Good capacity: 56 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ivancica Schrunk, Rina Quartarone

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

280-W01
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Finnegan
AMCDCoreFAPX 
01/31 - 05/20
25/26/0
Lecture
CRN 26791
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 26791

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

220-01
Logic
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
S. Menssen
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 26701
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 26701

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sandra Menssen

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

220-02
Logic
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
J. Stoltz
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 26702
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 246

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 246

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC 246

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 26702

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jonathan Stoltz

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

220-03
Logic
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
J. Stoltz
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 27627
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 246

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 246

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 246

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 27627

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jonathan Stoltz

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
G. Frost
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 29074
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 29074

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

235-W40
HNR:Politics Law & Common Good
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
C. Toner
HonorCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 27981
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL62

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL62

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL62

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 27981

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Toner

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197 and HONORS.

4 Credits

241-01
Hist. & Philosophy of Medicine
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
P. Distelzweig
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/14/0
Lecture
CRN 27982
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 111

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 111

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 27982

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 111
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

Develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease and health care. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

245-01
Philosophy of Art and Beauty
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 28729
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 203

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 203

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 28729

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

What does it mean for something to be beautiful? Is beauty an objective property of things or is it entirely in the eye of the beholder? Are perceiving beauty, making beautiful things, and being beautiful essential to a flourishing human life? Should beauty be any more important to us than other aesthetic qualities like elegance, ugliness, horror, or being cool? What does it take for something to be a work of art and does it have anything to do with beauty? Do the answers to any of these questions have anything to do with God? In this class, we’ll talk about these questions and about some ways that philosophers throughout history have answered them. We’ll start by discussing some views from the ancient and medieval Catholic philosophical tradition. But we’ll spend most of the class discussing contemporary views, including those from non-European traditions. Along the way, we’ll listen to some musical pieces, watch some films, and view some paintings that will help us better think about beauty and art. Our goal will be to come to a deeper appreciation of beauty and of its central role in a happy human life. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

250-01
Christian Mysteries
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
T. Pawl
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
24/23/0
Lecture
CRN 28727
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 106

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 106

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 28727

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 106
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Tim Pawl

Philosophers of religion have engaged in extensive analysis and debate regarding the rational coherence of central Christian doctrines. While philosophical critics of the faith have argued that various Christian doctrines are impossible or contradictory, philosophical defenders of the faith have maintained, on the contrary, that such doctrines can withstand rational scrutiny, employing the resources of philosophy to show how. This course will consider some of these discussions, focusing on such doctrines as the Doctrine of Creation; the Incarnation; the Trinity; the Eucharist; the Atonement; Providence, Grace, and Free Will; and the classical divine attributes (e.g. divine simplicity, immutability, and eternity). Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

254-01
Biomedical Ethics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Giebel
CGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 28730
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 108

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 108

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 28730

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 108
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heidi Giebel

Explore and analyze ethical issues related to clinical and social aspects of medicine—both from the perspective of Catholic intellectual tradition and from other philosophical perspectives. For example, what is the primary role of a medical practitioner: to give the “customer” what s/he wants, or to promote a more objective standard of health? Under what conditions should a physician or nurse be allowed to opt out of doing work that violates his or her conscience? Is euthanasia ethically acceptable, and should it be legally permitted? And (how) should we provide medical care to those who cannot afford to pay for it? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

258-01
Environmental Ethics
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
S. Laumakis
FAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
30/29/0
Lecture
CRN 27628
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 29
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC 201

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 27628

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Stephen Laumakis

This course will consider the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment. We will begin by considering what various philosophical perspectives have to say about the scope of and justification for our obligations concerning the environment. This will require that we think about who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration. We will explore issues such as animal welfare, conservation, species preservation, climate change, population pressure, and sustainability, all with an eye toward deciding how individuals and communities should respond to the various environmental challenges we face today. To achieve these goals, the course will deal with both ethical theory and practical case studies. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

265-01
Minds, Brains, and Computers
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
J. Stoltz
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
30/27/0
Lecture
CRN 28728
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 247

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 247

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 247

   

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 28728

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jonathan Stoltz

A philosophical examination of the mind from both classical and contemporary perspectives. Content that may be covered includes: the relation between the mind and the body/brain, theories of the soul and how it relates to mind and brain, theories of personal identity over time, free will, mental causation, functionalist theories of intelligence, computer/artificial intelligence, and the nature of consciousness. The course considers reflection on these topics from within both Catholic intellectual tradition and other traditions and perspectives, and engages contemporary philosophical work informed by brain and computer science. Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

460-D1
Philosophy of God
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Spencer
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 27977
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 203

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 27977

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. In this course, we will consider some central issues in that discipline. The class will begin by discussing arguments for the existence of God and other ways in which we can naturally know God, especially perceiving God by perceiving beauty. Next, we will think about attributes of God that can be known by human reason, such as divine goodness, simplicity, and freedom. Finally, we will consider issues having to do with the relation between creatures and God, such as creation, conservation, providence, and predestination. We will read from Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae and from authors in the analytic, Reformed, Byzantine, and polytheistic traditions, as well as from those who object in various ways to theism. Writing a major paper and preparing for a public presentation will be a central focus of the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 and PHIL 365.

4 Credits

460-D2
Philosophy of God
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
T. Feeney
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 27978
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 211

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 211

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 27978

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 211
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

We will study God using the resources and tools of philosophy, with an emphasis on the thought of Thomas Aquinas. Key questions include whether God exists, is a being, is the only being, may be known from creation, is simple, has a nature, is responsible for imperfect things, knows imperfect things, has emotions, loves and is lovable, and may be revealed. The readings and our discussion catalyze your own semester-long research project. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 and PHIL 365.

4 Credits

460-D3
Philosophy of God
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
T. Feeney
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
15/11/0
Lecture
CRN 28600
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 211

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 211

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 28600

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 211
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Thomas Feeney

We will study God using the resources and tools of philosophy, with an emphasis on the thought of Thomas Aquinas. Key questions include whether God exists, is a being, is the only being, may be known from creation, is simple, has a nature, is responsible for imperfect things, knows imperfect things, has emotions, loves and is lovable, and may be revealed. The readings and our discussion catalyze your own semester-long research project. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 and PHIL 365.

4 Credits

SPAN: Spanish

315-L01
Hispanic Linguistics
 
Blended
D. Pinto
EdTrnCore 
01/31 - 05/20
24/23/0
Lecture
CRN 27166
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 302

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 302

     

Subject: Spanish (SPAN)

CRN: 27166

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 302
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Language/Culture

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Derrin Pinto

An introduction to both contemporary and historical Hispanic linguistics. Descriptive Spanish phonetics and phonology. History of the Spanish language with emphasis on historical sound-change phenomena. Systematic study of dialectal variation in both Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 301 and 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course, (may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 305).

4 Credits

320-01
Business Spanish
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Perez Castillejo
EdTrnCore 
01/31 - 05/20
18/17/0
Lecture
CRN 29423
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 206

       

Subject: Spanish (SPAN)

CRN: 29423

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Language/Culture

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     School of Ed Transfer Course

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Susana Perez Castillejo

Practice in the language skills and vocabulary needed to conduct business in the Hispanic world; an overview of political, economic, social and cultural factors which affect business in the Hispanic countries. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 301 and 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course (may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 305).

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

200-L01
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
C. Anthony
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
14/13/0
Lecture
CRN 28536
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28536

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Cara Anthony

This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

223-L01
Belief: The Christian Story
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
C. Anthony
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
11/11/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28535
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MHC 201

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28535

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

200-L02
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
C. Anthony
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
9/9/0
Lecture
CRN 28538
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28538

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Cara Anthony

This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

223-L02
Belief: The Christian Story
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
C. Anthony
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 28537
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 201

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28537

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

205-L01
Old Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Niskanen
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
12/11/0
Lecture
CRN 26755
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 26755

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Paul Niskanen

This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

221-L01
Bible: Old Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Niskanen
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
13/13/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28532
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 205

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28532

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

205-L02
Old Testament
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
P. Niskanen
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
8/8/0
Lecture
CRN 27718
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 27718

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Paul Niskanen

This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

221-L02
Bible: Old Testament
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
P. Niskanen
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
17/19/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28494
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 201

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28494

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

205-03
Old Testament
 
Online
K. Wilson
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
21/20/0
Lecture
CRN 27719
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 27719

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Kelly Wilson

This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

221-03
Bible: Old Testament
 
Online
K. Wilson
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
9/10/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28498
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28498

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 1

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelly Wilson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

205-04
Old Testament
 
Online
K. Wilson
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
21/20/0
Lecture
CRN 27720
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 27720

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Kelly Wilson

This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

221-04
Bible: Old Testament
 
Online
K. Wilson
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
9/8/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28460
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28460

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 1

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelly Wilson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles

4 Credits

215-W05
Christian Morality
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Twite
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
11/9/0
Lecture
CRN 29445
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29445

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

  Mary Twite

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-W05
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Twite
FAPXSUSTCGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
9/10/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28556
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 247

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28556

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 247
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Sustainability (SUST)
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mary Twite

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

215-06
Christian Morality
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
P. Wojda
FAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 27430
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 126

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 27430

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

  Paul Wojda

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics.

4 Credits

225-07
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
P. Wojda
FAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
15/10/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28585
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 126

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28585

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Wojda

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

222-L01
History: Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
6/6/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 28506
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online 1

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28506

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

222-LA1
History: Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
9/10/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 29491
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online 1

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29491

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

This section will compare how Jews, Christians, and Muslims think about major themes, such as God, Jesus, creation, revelation, and the human being. It will treat how the Abrahamic traditions are sources for determining the common good especially as it relates to respect for our world, the human community, and the dignity of each human being. 

4 Credits

230-L01
Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
5/5/0
Lecture
CRN 28512
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online 1

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28512

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Steven McMichael

A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

230-LA1
Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
6/4/0
Lecture
CRN 29493
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online 1

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29493

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Steven McMichael

This section will compare how Jews, Christians, and Muslims think about major themes, such as God, Jesus, creation, revelation, and the human being. It will treat how the Abrahamic traditions are sources for determining the common good especially as it relates to respect for our world, the human community, and the dignity of each human being. 

4 Credits

222-W02
History: Reformation
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
S. Jordon
MUMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
14/13/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 28525
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC LL01

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC LL01

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28525

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Shirley Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves an investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. We will also examine the Roman Cahtolic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women.

4 Credits

240-W02
Prot & Catholic Reformation
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
S. Jordon
MUMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
6/7/0
Lecture
CRN 27294
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC LL01

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC LL01

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 27294

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

  Shirley Jordon

This section involves an investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. We will also examine the Roman Cahtolic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women.

4 Credits

222-W03
History: Reformation
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
S. Jordon
MUMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
15/14/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 28509
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28509

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Shirley Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section involves an investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. We will also examine the Roman Cahtolic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women.

4 Credits

240-W03
Prot & Catholic Reformation
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
S. Jordon
MUMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
5/5/0
Lecture
CRN 29327
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
JRC LL01

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29327

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

  Shirley Jordon

This section involves an investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. We will also examine the Roman Cahtolic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women.

4 Credits

224-W41
HONORS: Bridges:Theo&C.S.Lewis
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Rolnick
HonorCore 
01/31 - 05/20
7/4/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 28543
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
BEC LL07

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
BEC LL07

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28543

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL07
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Philip Rolnick

Readings will focus primarily on C.S. Lewis's literary works, especially, but not exclusively, on his fiction. The course will also include some critical works, both Lewis's as well as others' work about Lewis. In addition, numerous biblical passages will be examined, including the parables of Jesus, which, as a parallel to Lewis's work, can demonstrate the theological possibility of narrative. Class lectures and readings in and about Lewis will explore Christian theology and its interdisciplinary relations to literature, especially myth. Through the lens of Lewis's literature, historical, philosophical, moral, educational, and global issues will be considered.

4 Credits

462-W41
HONR Theo and Lit - C.S. Lewis
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
P. Rolnick
HonorCore 
01/31 - 05/20
13/11/0
Lecture
CRN 29340
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
BEC LL07

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
BEC LL07

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29340

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL07
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Honors Course
     Writing Intensive

  Philip Rolnick

Readings will focus primarily on C.S. Lewis's literary works, especially, but not exclusively, on his fiction. The course will also include some critical works, both Lewis's as well as others' work about Lewis. In addition, numerous biblical passages will be examined, including the parables of Jesus, which, as a parallel to Lewis's work, can demonstrate the theological possibility of narrative. Class lectures and readings in and about Lewis will explore Christian theology and its interdisciplinary relations to literature, especially myth. Through the lens of Lewis's literature, historical, philosophical, moral, educational, and global issues will be considered.

4 Credits

224-L01
Bridges: Theo & Mass Media
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
D. Landry
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
14/13/0
Topics Lecture 10
CRN 28545
4 Cr.
Size: 14
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 203

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 203

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28545

In Person | Topics Lecture 10

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course will analyze and evaluate the coverage of religion and religious issues in the mass media (primarily in newspaper and magazines) and analyze religiously-inspired or religiously-themed media products (primarily in films, radio, television programs, and books). This course attempts to develop skills in detecting the religious thread in the tapestry of modern culture, interpreting the theological content in popular culture, critically analyzing the coverage of religion in the news, and appreciating the ways in which the finest examples of religiously-themed popular culture have advanced the theological conversation of which all modern believers are a part.

4 Credits

450-L01
Theology & Mass Media
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
D. Landry
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
11/10/0
Lecture
CRN 29328
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 203

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 203

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29328

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

  David Landry

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. This course will analyze and evaluate the coverage of religion and religious issues in the mass media (primarily in newspaper and magazines) and analyze religiously-inspired or religiously-themed media products (primarily in films, radio, television programs, and books). This course attempts to develop skills in detecting the religious thread in the tapestry of modern culture, interpreting the theological content in popular culture, critically analyzing the coverage of religion in the news, and appreciating the ways in which the finest examples of religiously-themed popular culture have advanced the theological conversation of which all modern believers are a part. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course.

4 Credits

224-L02
Bridges: Theo & Mass Media
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Landry
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
12/9/0
Topics Lecture 10
CRN 28551
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 201

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28551

In Person | Topics Lecture 10

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course will analyze and evaluate the coverage of religion and religious issues in the mass media (primarily in newspaper and magazines) and analyze religiously-inspired or religiously-themed media products (primarily in films, radio, television programs, and books). This course attempts to develop skills in detecting the religious thread in the tapestry of modern culture, interpreting the theological content in popular culture, critically analyzing the coverage of religion in the news, and appreciating the ways in which the finest examples of religiously-themed popular culture have advanced the theological conversation of which all modern believers are a part.

4 Credits

450-L02
Theology & Mass Media
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Landry
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
13/11/0
Lecture
CRN 29329
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 201

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29329

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing to learn

  David Landry

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. This course will analyze and evaluate the coverage of religion and religious issues in the mass media (primarily in newspaper and magazines) and analyze religiously-inspired or religiously-themed media products (primarily in films, radio, television programs, and books). This course attempts to develop skills in detecting the religious thread in the tapestry of modern culture, interpreting the theological content in popular culture, critically analyzing the coverage of religion in the news, and appreciating the ways in which the finest examples of religiously-themed popular culture have advanced the theological conversation of which all modern believers are a part. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course.

4 Credits

224-L03
Bridges: Theo& Technology
 
Blended
B. Heidgerken
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
7/7/0
Topics Lecture 13
CRN 29372
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:30 pm
OEC 208

           
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29372

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 13

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 208
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ben Heidgerken

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines how technology shapes our identities and our relationships with nature, other people, and the transcendent. Does technology bring us closer to the natural world or make it harder to experience it? Does it help or hinder our relationships with other people and with God? We’ll look at historical examples, such as the impact of electric lights, and current technologies, like virtual reality and prosthetic enhancements of the body. The course readings will include a range of voices from Christian theology, from ancient to modern times, that offer insight on sharing a meaningful human life with others and discerning the presence of the divine in work, leisure, silence, and the natural world.

4 Credits

489-L03
Topics: Theo & Technology
 
Blended
B. Heidgerken
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
18/18/0
Lecture
CRN 28564
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:30 pm
OEC 208

           
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28564

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 208
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing to learn

  Ben Heidgerken

This section examines how technology shapes our identities and our relationships with nature, other people, and the transcendent. Does technology bring us closer to the natural world or make it harder to experience it? Does it help or hinder our relationships with other people and with God? We’ll look at historical examples, such as the impact of electric lights, and current technologies, like virtual reality and prosthetic enhancements of the body. The course readings will include a range of voices from Christian theology, from ancient to modern times, that offer insight on sharing a meaningful human life with others and discerning the presence of the divine in work, leisure, silence, and the natural world.

4 Credits

224-W04
Bridges: Theo & Environment
 
See Details
C. Anthony
FAPXJPMRSUSTCore 
01/31 - 05/20
4/3/0
Topics Lecture 9
CRN 28539
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 246

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 246

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28539

In Person | Topics Lecture 9

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony, Thomas Hickson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems.

4 Credits

300-D01
Signature: Theo & Environment
 
See Details
C. Anthony
FAPXJPMRSUSTCore 
01/31 - 05/20
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 9
CRN 28670
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 246

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 246

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28670

In Person | Topics Lecture 9

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities AND Signature Work
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony, Thomas Hickson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems.

4 Credits

459-W04
Theology & Environment
 
See Details
C. Anthony
FAPXJPMRSUSTCore 
01/31 - 05/20
15/15/0
Lecture
CRN 28540
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 246

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 246

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28540

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 246
     (Common Good capacity: 24 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

  Cara Anthony, Thomas Hickson

This section examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems.

4 Credits

224-W05
Bridges: Theology & Film
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
R. Koerpel
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
4/3/0
Topics Lecture 4
CRN 29375
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 209

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29375

In Person | Topics Lecture 4

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section explores the relationship between theology and film by teaching students the skills they need to be critical theological viewers of films. This course will operate under the assumption that, because films function as vehicles for ideas, they offer fruitful ground for theological reflection.

4 Credits

489-W05
Theology and Film
 
M 5:30 pm - 9:15 pm
R. Koerpel
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 28586
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 209

           

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28586

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Robert Koerpel

This section explores the relationship between theology and film by teaching students the skills they need to be critical theological viewers of films. This course will operate under the assumption that, because films function as vehicles for ideas, they offer fruitful ground for theological reflection.

4 Credits

224-W06
Bridges: Theology in Film
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Koerpel
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
4/3/0
Topics Lecture 4
CRN 28541
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 209

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 209

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28541

In Person | Topics Lecture 4

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section explores the relationship between theology and film by teaching students the skills they need to be critical theological viewers of films. This course will operate under the assumption that, because films function as vehicles for ideas, they offer fruitful ground for theological reflection.

4 Credits

489-W06
Theology & Film
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
R. Koerpel
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
16/15/0
Lecture
CRN 28542
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 209

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 209

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28542

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Robert Koerpel

This section explores the relationship between theology and film by teaching students the skills they need to be critical theological viewers of films. This course will operate under the assumption that, because films function as vehicles for ideas, they offer fruitful ground for theological reflection.

4 Credits

224-W08
Bridges: Theology & Art
 
Blended
C. Sautter
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
8/8/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 28547
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 210

 

N/A
N/A
Online 1

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28547

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cynthia Sautter

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, one Art History course.

4 Credits

453-W08
Theology & Art
 
Blended
C. Sautter
CoreSUST 
01/31 - 05/20
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 29343
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 210

 

N/A
N/A
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29343

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Sustainability (SUST)
     Writing Intensive

  Cynthia Sautter

Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, one Art History course.

4 Credits

224-W09
Bridges: Theology & Science
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
B. Zuelke
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
12/10/0
Topics Lecture 6
CRN 29367
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29367

In Person | Topics Lecture 6

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Brian Zuelke

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the interrelationship between Christian theology and the natural sciences. In the first half-semester (Weeks 1-6), we study the developmental history of the sciences in the context of Western (European) Christianity. These studies consider how Christians have historically engaged the sciences, both constructively and destructively, but also how the philosophical foundations of the sciences have come into question beginning in the 20th Century. In the second half-semester (Weeks 10-13), we study four major topics within which Christian theology and the sciences can interact: God, Creation, Humanity, and Jesus Christ.

4 Credits

300-D02
Signature: Theo & Science
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
B. Zuelke
SMMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
4/3/0
Topics Lecture 13
CRN 28671
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28671

In Person | Topics Lecture 13

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Integ/Humanities AND Signature Work
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Sci/Medicine/Soc Minor Approve
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Brian Zuelke

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course explores the interrelationship between Christian theology and the natural sciences. In the first half-semester (Weeks 1-6), we study the developmental history of the sciences in the context of Western (European) Christianity. These studies consider how Christians have historically engaged the sciences, both constructively and destructively, but also how the philosophical foundations of the sciences have come into question beginning in the 20th Century. In the second half-semester (Weeks 10-13), we study four major topics within which Christian theology and the sciences can interact: God, Creation, Humanity, and Jesus Christ.

4 Credits

434-W09
Science & Christian Theo
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
B. Zuelke
SMMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
4/2/0
Lecture
CRN 28544
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 308

       

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28544

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 308
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Sci/Medicine/Soc Minor Approve
     Writing Intensive

  Brian Zuelke

This course explores the interrelationship between Christian theology and the natural sciences. In the first half-semester (Weeks 1-6), we study the developmental history of the sciences in the context of Western (European) Christianity. These studies consider how Christians have historically engaged the sciences, both constructively and destructively, but also how the philosophical foundations of the sciences have come into question beginning in the 20th Century. In the second half-semester (Weeks 10-13), we study four major topics within which Christian theology and the sciences can interact: God, Creation, Humanity, and Jesus Christ.

4 Credits

224-11
Bridges: Theology & Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
FAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
15/16/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 28549
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28549

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

4 Credits

391-11
Seminar for Theo Maj/Min
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
FAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
1/1/0
Lecture
CRN 30033
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 30033

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

  Michael Hollerich

A capstone experience for theology majors and minors. The subject matter of this course, announced in the annual Class Schedule, will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate already existing theology courses. Students explore, in seminar format, a particular theological theme or issue form the perspective of at least three of the four sub-disciplines of theology (biblical, systematic, historical, moral). Under the guidance of the instructor, students will complete a major research project. Prerequisite: a minimum of sixteen credits in theology

4 Credits

433-11
Theology & Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
FAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 28550
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC 126

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28550

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert

  Michael Hollerich

This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

4 Credits

225-L01
Faith & Ethics: Social Thought
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
A. Levad
FAPXJPMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
18/17/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 29374
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29374

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Levad

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” Students will focus on theology's role in the formation of a social consciousness through class discussion and community engagement.

4 Credits

325-L01
Catholic Social Tradition
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
A. Levad
FAPXJPMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
6/5/0
Lecture
CRN 29331
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 201

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29331

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 50 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Writing to learn

  Amy Levad

Students will focus on theology's role in the formation of a social consciousness through class discussion and community engagement.

4 Credits

225-L03
Faith & Ethics: Immigration
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Siggelkow
FAPXJPMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
12/12/0
Topics Lecture 11
CRN 28554
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28554

In Person | Topics Lecture 11

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Ry Siggelkow

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This course will bring the tools and the methods of Christian ethics to bear on the issues of economic immigration in the contemporary, U.S. context. The first part of the course examines the economic, political, historical, social and cultural dimensions of transnational migration in the U.S. context. The second part of the course will bring the resources of Christian ethics to the ethical issues of immigration raised in the first part of the course. This second part of the course will examine the centrality of alterity (otherness) in the Bible and the Christian tradition. The course will conclude with the discussion of how Christian ethics can inform the national discourse on these issues and conversely, how the issues of migration must shape Christian ethics. This course will have a service learning component that will bring students into contact with immigrant communities in the Twin Cities. 

4 Credits

460-L03
Christian Ethics & US Immigrtn
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Siggelkow
FAPXJPMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
13/5/0
Lecture
CRN 29351
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29351

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)