⚠⚠⚠
Due to uncertainty related to the COVID-19 pandemic, it may become necessary to alter a course, including its mode of delivery, after registration. Changes will be communicated in advance whenever possible, accompanied by resources for student support. Regardless of delivery mode changes, we will continue to provide students with the type of personalized, active learning environments that are the hallmark of the St. Thomas educational experience.
⚠⚠⚠

Results

Enrollment and waitlist data for current and upcoming courses refresh every 10 minutes; all other information as of 6:00 AM.


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ARHS: Art History (Grad)

597-01
Pacific Art
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
G. Burau
02/01 - 05/21
3/1/0
Directed Study
CRN 26654
3 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
No Room

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
No Room

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
No Room

   

CRN: 26654

Directed Study

St Paul: No Room

ARHS: Art History (Grad)

598-01
Greek Art and Archaeology
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
M. Stansbury-O'Donnell
02/01 - 05/21
3/2/0
Directed Study
CRN 26655
3 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
No Room

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
No Room

     

CRN: 26655

Directed Study

St Paul: No Room

ARHS: Art History (Grad)

ARTH: Art History (UG)

251-01
Museum Studies: Practices
 
MW 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
V. Rousseau
MsumCore
02/01 - 05/21
25/26/0
Lecture
CRN 25492
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

       

CRN: 25492

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ARTH: Art History (UG):
     Art History Museum Studies
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Vanessa Rousseau

This course provides an investigation of the critical issues facing museums in the 21st century. Museum missions, practices, and resources will be interwoven with a discussion of audience, communication, and collaboration. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

4 Credits

270-01
Pacific Art
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
G. Burau
SUSTCore
02/01 - 05/21
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 25491
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   

CRN: 25491

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ARTH: Art History (UG):
     Sustainability Initiatives

Old Core:
     UG Core Fine Arts
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gretchen Burau

This course covers traditional as well as contemporary sculpture, painting, architecture, and body arts of Melanesia, Island Southeast Asia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Students will learn how material culture, along with the concepts of mana and tapu sustained highly stratified cultures in places such as Hawaii and New Zealand . They will also study more egalitarian societies in which cultures maintained a balanced relationship with their environment through beliefs and social practices. Examples of such societies include the Asmat, Komoro, and culture groups that inhabit the Geelvink Bay region. Students will have the opportunity to work with objects from the American Museum of Asmat Art at the University of St. Thomas (AMAA@UST).

4 Credits

297-W01
Topics-Street Art
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
H. Shirey
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25493
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

CRN: 25493

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

ARTH: Art History (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Online Printable Schedule, View Searchable Class Schedule

4 Credits

305-L01
Greek Art and Archaeology
 
Blended
M. Stansbury-O'Donnell
CCIVCore
02/01 - 05/21
13/12/0
Lecture
CRN 25494
4 Cr.
Size: 13
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 203

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25494

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 13 participants)

Online

ARTH: Art History (UG):
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr

Old Core:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Stansbury-O'Donnell

A survey of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the fall of the Bronze Age civilizations to the end of the Hellenistic period. Particular attention will be given to sculpture, vase painting, and the relationship of art to the broader culture, to the art of the ancient Near East and Egypt, and to gender relations in ancient Greece.

4 Credits

305-L1A
Greek Art and Archaeology
 
Blended
M. Stansbury-O'Donnell
CCIVCore
02/01 - 05/21
12/12/0
Lecture
CRN 26458
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
     

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 203

     
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26458

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 203
     (Common Good capacity: 13 participants)

Online

ARTH: Art History (UG):
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr

Old Core:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Stansbury-O'Donnell

A survey of the art and architecture of ancient Greece from the fall of the Bronze Age civilizations to the end of the Hellenistic period. Particular attention will be given to sculpture, vase painting, and the relationship of art to the broader culture, to the art of the ancient Near East and Egypt, and to gender relations in ancient Greece.

4 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

205-01
Crisis and Development
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
R. Kennedy
Core
02/01 - 05/21
18/18/0
Lecture
CRN 24404
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 207

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 207

     

CRN: 24404

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 207
     (Common Good capacity: 18 participants)

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course explores from an interdisciplinary perspective the history of the Catholic Church as it interacts with the secular world and is shaped by its dominant personalities and events. No other institution in history has survived, and flourished, for so long and in the face of so many challenges. This course will critically reflect upon the history of the Church, from its origins in the Apostolic Age to the modern period, as a series of cycles with a common pattern of creativity, achievement, and retreat. Students may expect to complete the course with an awareness and understanding of the major personalities and events, secular and ecclesial, that have shaped the life of the Church.

4 Credits

301-D01
The Catholic Vision
 
See Details
B. Junker
Core
02/01 - 05/21
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 23002
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
55S 207

       

CRN: 23002

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzman Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG):
     Writing in the Discipline

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Billy Junker

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: CATH 101

4 Credits

308-01
Woman and Man
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
E. Kidd
Core
02/01 - 05/21
25/21/0
Online: Synchronous
CRN 25392
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
Online

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
Online

     

CRN: 25392

Online: Some Synchronous | Online: Synchronous

Online

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Erika Kidd

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

4 Credits

308-02
Woman and Man
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Kidd
Core
02/01 - 05/21
25/24/0
Online: Synchronous
CRN 25421
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

CRN: 25421

Online: Some Synchronous | Online: Synchronous

Online

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Erika Kidd

This course examines the definition of "woman" and "man" from both the historical and the philosophical perspective. Readings and discussion center on the question of (1) whether there are important philosophical differences between women and men and (2) whether such differences are natural or socially constructed. The implications of various answers to those questions are then examined, with special attention given to the Catholic tradition's reflections on the nature and ends of marriage, the character of priestly ordination, friendship between women and men, and human sexuality. The purpose of this course is to examine the ways in which thinkers from a wide spectrum have construed male/female relationships. A major component of this course consists in the study of power and the way it operates both in history and in contemporary culture.

4 Credits

340-01
Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
R. Kennedy
Core
02/01 - 05/21
25/25/0
Lecture
CRN 25091
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MHC 205

     

CRN: 25091

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

4 Credits

340-02
Church&Culture:Soc Dim of Cath
 
See Details
R. Kennedy
Core
02/01 - 05/21
12/8/0
Lecture
CRN 26561
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
55S 207

     

CRN: 26561

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Sitzman Hall 207
     (Common Good capacity: 12 participants)

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Kennedy

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science. This course will satisfy the third level Faith and Catholic Tradition core requirement. Prerequisite: CATH 101

4 Credits

405-01
John Henry Newman
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
D. Deavel
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 24701
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 201

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 201

   

CRN: 24701

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Deavel

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons.

4 Credits

405-02
John Henry Newman
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
D. Deavel
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/12/0
Lecture
CRN 26562
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 201

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 201

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 201

   

CRN: 26562

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Deavel

John Henry Newman has been called, somewhat misleadingly, the father of the Second Vatican Council. According to Jarsoslav Pelikan, "(n)ot only to his latter day disciples, ...but to many of those who have drawn other conclusions from his insights, John Henry Newman has become the most important theological thinker of modern times." T.S. Eliot had insisted that he is one of the two most eloquent sermon writers in the English language. Pope Benedict XVI stressed his importance as the theologian of conscience when he presided at his beatification in England. In this course we will examine not only Cardinal Newman's most important theological works focusing on the development of doctrine and the role of conscience in relation to Church authority, but also his philosophical works addressing the relations of faith and reason, his work on university education and selected poetry, meditations and devotions, and sermons.

4 Credits

CLAS: Classical Civilization

245-W01
Classical Mythology
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
L. Hepner
CCIVCGoodCoreWMST
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 24740
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 24740

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

CLAS: Classical Civilization:
     Class, Civilization Major Appr
     Class. Civilization Minor Appr
     CommGood/Changemaking
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive
     Women's Studies Major Approved
     Women's Studies Minor Approved

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Hepner

Mythology is the embodiment and encoding of the beliefs, principles, and aspirations of ancient cultures. This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to mythology as an introduction and foundation to Classical civilization. Both Greek and Roman myths will be examined from a variety of theoretical perspectives, including aetioligical, structuralist, and psychological theories. Consideration will also be given to the study of literature in translation, art history, religion, and history. The course grade will be principally based on writing assignments and class discussions. ENGL 203 may also be substituted for this course.

4 Credits

COMM: Communication Studies

370-01
Intercultural Communication
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
X. Guan
CoreWMST
02/01 - 05/21
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 25409
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online

       

CRN: 25409

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

COMM: Communication Studies:
     Women's Studies Major Approved

Old Core:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Xiaowen Guan

Study of the influence of cultural values on social behavior; examination of theories of intercultural communication; emphasis on effective intercultural interaction.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

201-W01
Writers at Work
 
See Details
L. Lindeen
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 25071
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25071

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Laurie Lindeen

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

201-W02
Writers at Work
 
See Details
M. Batt
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 25072
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25072

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Matthew Batt

Writers at Work will examine fiction, nonfiction, drama, and poetry from the point of view of both writer and audience, artist and critic. We will read contemporary literature in each genre, as well as some secondary materials written whenever possible by those same authors. For example, we might read David Mamet's play GLENGARRY, GLEN ROSS and then his craft book ON DIRECTING FILM; Charles Baxter's novel THE FEAST OF LOVE and then his craft book THE ART OF SUBTEXT; Richard Hugo's poetry as well as his craft book THE TRIGGERING TOWN; Annie Dillard and Jo Anne Beard's essays paired with Sven Birkerts' THE ART OF TIME IN MEMOIR; and then various readings paired with THE WRITERS' NOTEBOOK: CRAFT ESSAYS FROM TIN HOUSE. Everyone will both write in and about each genre. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204.Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

201-W03
The American Short Story
 
See Details
K. Larson
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25073
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25073

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

201-W04
The American Short Story
 
See Details
K. Larson
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25074
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25074

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W42
HNRS City Lights: Urban Lit
 
Blended
O. Herrera
CoreHonor
02/01 - 05/21
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 25383
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 209

     

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25383

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 18 participants)

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Honors Course
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Olga Herrera

This course explores urban experience through the perspective of writers working in fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and poetry. It will focus on the way writers in those genres use language and literary devices to address the life and landscape of the city. Students will engage first-hand with the urban environment in the Twin Cities and bring that experience into their analytic and reflective writing for the semester. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This Aquinas Scholars honors course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

4 Credits

202-W43
HNRS City Lights: Urban Lit
 
Blended
O. Herrera
CoreHonor
02/01 - 05/21
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 25752
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 209

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25752

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 18 participants)

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     Honors Course
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Olga Herrera

This course explores urban experience through the perspective of writers working in fiction, drama, creative nonfiction, and poetry. It will focus on the way writers in those genres use language and literary devices to address the life and landscape of the city. Students will engage first-hand with the urban environment in the Twin Cities and bring that experience into their analytic and reflective writing for the semester. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This Aquinas Scholars honors course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

4 Credits

202-W01
Family is Family
 
See Details
C. Craft-Fairchild
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25076
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25076

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Catherine Craft-Fairchild

Everyone begins as part of a family. But what counts as "family"--only those connected to us through biology or also those connected to us by choice? What kinds of challenges do adopted children face? What kinds of challenges do biological children face when they look at their difficult, aging parents and realize, yes, this could be my future? There are certainly many ways for families to be dysfunctional; what kinds of steps and work are necessary for family to be functional? This course will examine literature devoted to the topic of family in all of its forms. Texts include Henrik Ibsen's A DOLL HOUSE, Heather Raffo's NOURA, Jane Jong Trenka's THE LANGUAGE OF BLOOD, Alison Bechdel's FUN HOME, Natasha Trethewey's MONUMENT, August Wilson's FENCES, and Dominique Morisseau's PIPELINE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W02
Sports and Social Justice
 
Blended
L. Wilkinson
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25083
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MCH 114

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MCH 114

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 25083

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 114
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W03
Greenest Land: Irish Writing
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Gardiner
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/13/0
Lecture
CRN 25482
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 111

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 111

       

CRN: 25482

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 111
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Gardiner

This course examines a body of Irish texts within the framework of the discipline of Irish Studies – a multi-disciplinary field of studies which includes literature, music, visual arts and film that stands adjacent to, but apart from, English studies. Texts will include major authors, musicians and film-makers over the past century to the present. Also, throughout the term, students will have opportunities to be involved with the activities and publications of the UST Center for Irish Studies. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W04
Medical Dramas
 
See Details
A. Underthun-Meilahn
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/21/0
Lecture
CRN 25079
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25079

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Alison Underthun-Meilahn

In medical schools you’ll now find doctors- and nurses-in-training reading literature and engaging in role-play to learn how to care. This course explores dramatic literature as a tool for healing; in it, we’ll read and write about drama as literary genre, blueprint for performance, and means of understanding ourselves and others. The plays we will encounter illuminate questions about intimacy and care in relationships and the physical and mental traumas of racism, addiction, anxiety, depression, grief, and suicide. Students will have the opportunity to work with local theater artists and to research the effects of our current pandemics on mental health. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W05
Medical Dramas
 
See Details
A. Muse
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25080
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
Online

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25080

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Muse

In medical schools you’ll now find doctors- and nurses-in-training reading literature and engaging in role-play to learn how to care. This course explores dramatic literature as a tool for healing; in it, we’ll read and write about drama as literary genre, blueprint for performance, and means of understanding ourselves and others. The plays we will encounter illuminate questions about intimacy and care in relationships and the physical and mental traumas of racism, addiction, anxiety, depression, grief, and suicide. Students will have the opportunity to work with local theater artists and to research the effects of our current pandemics on mental health. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

202-W06
Sports & Social Justice
 
Blended
L. Wilkinson
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 25382
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 114

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 114

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   

CRN: 25382

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 114
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

What is any sports event but a story--multiple stories--playing out before our eyes? Sports by definition involve drama: conflicts in decision making, in relationships, with nature, and, if we believe it possible, conflicts with the supernatural. It's not an accident that some of our greatest metaphors come from the arena of athletics. Through sports we have a way to look at human values--at the best we have to offer and sometimes the worst. We’ll use sports literature to investigate what is just… and what is unjust… and how we discern which is which. In this class, we will read fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry. Books may include GIRL RUNNER, BIG SMOKE, TAKE ME OUT, and BEST AMERICAN SPORTS WRITING 2020. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204.

4 Credits

203-W01
Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
H. Bouwman
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25084
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

     

CRN: 25084

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W02
Once Upon a Time: Fairy Tales
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
H. Bouwman
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25085
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
Online

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
Online

     

CRN: 25085

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Bouwman

In this course we'll study a small collection of fairy and folk tales closely, both in their early written sources and later literary re-imaginings. As we read different versions of the stories, we'll ask ourselves how these tales are structured, what audiences they're aimed at, what they might be telling us about the culture of the time, and what they might have to say to us today. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 202 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

211-L01
British Authors I
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
R. MacKenzie
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 25070
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 115

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 115

       

CRN: 25070

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 115
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

ENGL: English (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Raymond MacKenzie

How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives and Early British Literature distribution requirements in the English major and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. It also counts as a core literature/writing course for students in the old core who started that core with an ENGL 201-204 class. Permission is also being sought to count this as an Integration in the Humanities course as well. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

4 Credits

371-L01
19th Century American Lit
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Scheiber
ENGL*Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 25069
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

CRN: 25069

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

ENGL: English (UG):
     English American Lit. Req.
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Andrew Scheiber

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from 19th-Century American Literature, a time of national expansion, civil war and restoration. Selected texts and authors (such as Hawthorne, Brown, Sedgewick, Chesnutt, Douglass, Freeman, James) will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. This course fulfills both the Contexts and Convergences and Early American Literature distribution requirements in the English major, the core literature/writing requirement for students under the old core who started with an ENGL 201-204 class, an Integration in the Humanities requirement in the new core, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121, 190, 201, 202, 203, or 204.

4 Credits

FILM: Film Studies

300-L01
World Cinema
 
Online
J. Kroll
FILMCore
02/01 - 05/21
24/26/0
Lecture
CRN 23766
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 23766

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

FILM: Film Studies:
     Film Studies History&Analysis
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Juli Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

300-L02
World Cinema
 
Online
J. Kroll
FILMCore
02/01 - 05/21
24/25/0
Online: Asynchronous
CRN 26677
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26677

Online: Asynchronous | Online: Asynchronous

Online

FILM: Film Studies:
     Film Studies History&Analysis
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Juli Kroll

In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film.

4 Credits

HIST: History

227-01
Global History of Genocide
 
See Details
Z. Nagy
Core
02/01 - 05/21
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 25882
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25882

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

HIST: History

2020 Core:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Zsolt Nagy

The course surveys some of the most heinous mass murders that took place during the twentieth century: 1) The Herero and Nama in German South Africa 2) Armenian Genocide 3) Stalin’s Genocides 4) The Holocaust 5) Mass Killing in Cambodia 6) Rwandan Genocide 7) Ethnic Cleansing in Yugoslavia. The class will critically examine the concepts and terms associated with mass murder. Through careful reading of primary and secondary literature students will investigate why, under what circumstances and by whom these acts were carried out. Students will also seek to understand the responsibilities and responses of local, national, and international communities regarding mass killing. Finally, the course will depict the different ways that we remember these events and commemorate their victims. Prerequisite: One 100-level History course or permission of instructor.

4 Credits

228-01
Environmental History
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
W. Cavert
SUSTCore
02/01 - 05/21
17/17/0
Lecture
CRN 25875
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   

CRN: 25875

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

HIST: History:
     Sustainability Initiatives

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Will Cavert

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

4 Credits

228-02
Environmental History
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
W. Cavert
SUSTCore
02/01 - 05/21
16/15/0
Lecture
CRN 25876
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 25876

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

HIST: History:
     Sustainability Initiatives

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Will Cavert

Humans are part of nature, and yet they have always changed and manipulated it. This course examines the entangled story of human/nature interactions, from the early history of our species up into the twenty-first century. Doing this draws on a range of methods, tools, and skills, including archaeology and anthropology, physical sciences like geology and biology, and the close reading of texts and objects as developed in humanistic disciplines like English, philosophy, and history. Key topics may include the co-evolution of people and other species; the ways that world religions have understood nature; the global mingling of people, plants, animals, and microbes after 1492; responses to pollution and toxicity in the modern world; and the development and politicization of climate science in the 20th-21st centuries.

4 Credits

HONR: Honors

480-02
HONORS Improvisation for Life
 
See Details
C. Kachian
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/13/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 24064
2 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
BIN 119

         

CRN: 24064

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Binz Refectory 119
     (Common Good capacity: 42 participants)

HONR: Honors

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Christopher Kachian, Bernard Armada

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

2 Credits

JOUR: Journalism/Mass Comm

372-W01
Environmental Journalism
 
TR 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
M. Neuzil
SUSTCGoodCore
02/01 - 05/21
20/15/0
Lecture
CRN 25555
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 15
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MHC 206

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MHC 206

     

CRN: 25555

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

JOUR: Journalism/Mass Comm:
     Sustainability Initiatives
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing Intensive

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Neuzil

This course focuses on the communication of mediated information about the environment. Students will examine what makes (and what has made) the environmental stories we tell about ourselves, from writing about agriculture, nature and spirituality to green advertising, the rhetoric of the environmental movement, and environmental movies and music.

4 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

220-01
Logic
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
S. Menssen
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 23174
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

CRN: 23174

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

PHIL: Philosophy

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sandra Menssen

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

4 Credits

220-02
Logic
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
M. Winter
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 23175
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 234

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 234

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
MCH 234

   

CRN: 23175

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 234
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

PHIL: Philosophy

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

4 Credits

220-03
Logic
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
M. Winter
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 24546
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 234

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 234

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 234

   

CRN: 24546

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 234
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

PHIL: Philosophy

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Winter

This course provides students with skills for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating the sorts of reasoning encountered in natural language. Emphasis will be placed on attaining facility with different formal systems for representing and evaluating arguments - including propositional logic, Aristotelian syllogistic, and first-order predicate calculus - as well as on acquiring the ability to apply these systems in the analysis and evaluation of arguments in ordinary and philosophical discourse. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

4 Credits

235-01
Politics, Law, and Common Good
 
See Details
C. Toner
Core
02/01 - 05/21
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 25461
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 101B

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 101B

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
OEC 101B

   

CRN: 25461

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 101B
     (Common Good capacity: 64 participants)

PHIL: Philosophy

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Toner

A philosophical examination into the origin, nature, purpose, and legitimacy of government and law, especially as these relate to the good of individuals and the common good. Possible questions include: Are human beings by nature political animals? What justifies political and legal authority? What sorts of political regimes can be just and legitimate? Is there a best type of government? Are there universal human rights and, if so, where do they come from? What are the respective roles of legislator, executive, and judge? Can civil disobedience ever be justified? Can violent revolution? Should government and law take stands on questions of morality, religion, and the meaning of life or try to remain neutral in these matters? The course will consider both classical and contemporary reflection on such topics, including from authors within Catholic intellectual tradition in conversation with other traditions and perspectives. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

4 Credits

241-01
Hist. & Philosophy of Medicine
 
See Details
P. Distelzweig
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 25462
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 111

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
MCH 111

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

     
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 25462

Hyflex: Flexible Learning | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 111
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

PHIL: Philosophy

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Peter Distelzweig

Develop a critical and creative perspective on medicine and health care through philosophical exploration of their history, foundations, and purposes. Study important episodes and developments in the history of the theory and practice of medicine and explore philosophical analyses of and arguments about the nature of medical knowledge, health, disease and health care. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197.

4 Credits

258-01
Environmental Ethics
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
F. Pawl
SUSTCore
02/01 - 05/21
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 24548
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
KOC 113

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
KOC 113

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
KOC 113

   

CRN: 24548

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Koch Commons 113

PHIL: Philosophy:
     Sustainability Initiatives

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Faith Pawl

This course will consider the ethical dimensions of human interaction with the environment. We will begin by considering what various philosophical perspectives have to say about the scope of and justification for our obligations concerning the environment. This will require that we think about who all (or what all) count as the proper objects of moral consideration. We will explore issues such as animal welfare, conservation, species preservation, climate change, population pressure, and sustainability, all with an eye toward deciding how individuals and communities should respond to the various environmental challenges we face today. To achieve these goals, the course will deal with both ethical theory and practical case studies. Prerequisite: PHIL 110, 115 or 197 or 214 or 215.

4 Credits

460-D01
Philosophy of God
 
See Details
M. Rota
Core
02/01 - 05/21
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 25457
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL62

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC LL62

     

CRN: 25457

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 14 participants)

PHIL: Philosophy

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Rota

A careful examination of a number of philosophical arguments concerning the existence and attributes of God. We’ll start with a section on God’s nature, focusing on debates about the attributes of divine simplicity, immutability, and eternity and on God’s knowledge of the future. In the second section, we’ll consider reasons in favor of belief in God, beginning with a brief examination of Reformed Epistemology (the idea that belief in God can be rational even in the absence of good arguments for the existence of God), and then proceed to more detailed examinations of Pascal’s Wager, Cosmological arguments, Design arguments (especially the fine-tuning argument), and Moral arguments for the existence of God. Finally, in the third section, we’ll examine objections to the rationality of belief in God. We will briefly explore the problem of contingency for religious belief (if you were born elsewhere, elsewhen, your religious beliefs would probably have been very different) and the argument from divine hiddenness (if God existed, He would have made Himself obvious to all), and then turn to an in-depth examination of the problem of evil. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 and PHIL 365.

4 Credits

460-D02
Philosophy of God
 
See Details
M. Spencer
Core
02/01 - 05/21
15/13/0
Lecture
CRN 25458
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC LL62

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
JRC LL62

     

CRN: 25458

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL62
     (Common Good capacity: 14 participants)

PHIL: Philosophy

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark Spencer

The highest branch of philosophy, and the branch of philosophy that most helps us reach our natural end as human persons, is natural theology or philosophy of God. In this course, we will consider some central issues in philosophy of God. The class will begin by considering arguments for the existence of God and other ways in which we can naturally know God, especially perceiving God by perceiving beauty. Next, we will turn to arguments regarding attributes of God that can be known by human reason, such as divine goodness, simplicity, and freedom. Finally, we will consider issues having to do with the relation between creatures and God, such as creation, conservation, providence, and predestination. We will read from Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theologiae and from authors in the non-Thomistic Catholic, analytic, Reformed, Byzantine, Hindu, and polytheistic traditions, as well as from those who object in various ways to theism. Writing a major paper and preparing for a public presentation will be a central focus of the course. Prerequisite: PHIL 220 and PHIL 365.

4 Credits

SPAN: Spanish

315-L01
Hispanic Linguistics
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
D. Tight
EdTrnCore
02/01 - 05/21
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 23802
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 23802

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

SPAN: Spanish:
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Language/Culture

2020 Core:
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Dan Tight

An introduction to both contemporary and historical Hispanic linguistics. Descriptive Spanish phonetics and phonology. History of the Spanish language with emphasis on historical sound-change phenomena. Systematic study of dialectal variation in both Spain and Spanish America. Offered in fall semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 301 and 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course, (may be taken simultaneously with SPAN 305).

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

200-L06
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
D. Organ
CGoodCore
02/01 - 05/21
15/14/0
Lecture
CRN 26344
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 14
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

     

CRN: 26344

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Deborah Organ

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

223-L06
Belief: Ancient & Modern
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
D. Organ
CGoodCore
02/01 - 05/21
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26343
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

     

CRN: 26343

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Deborah Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

200-01
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
C. Anthony
Core
02/01 - 05/21
26/26/0
Lecture
CRN 26195
4 Cr.
Size: 26
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
ASC 378S

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
ASC 378S

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
ASC 378S

   

CRN: 26195

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Anderson Student Center 378S
     (Common Good capacity: 66 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Cara Anthony

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

223-01
Belief: The Christian Story
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
C. Anthony
Core
02/01 - 05/21
5/5/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26194
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
ASC 378S

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
ASC 378S

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
ASC 378S

   

CRN: 26194

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Anderson Student Center 378S
     (Common Good capacity: 66 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG)

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

200-02
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
See Details
C. Anthony
Core
02/01 - 05/21
23/23/0
Lecture
CRN 26197
4 Cr.
Size: 23
Enrolled: 23
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 101B

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 101B

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 101B

   

CRN: 26197

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 101B
     (Common Good capacity: 622 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Cara Anthony

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

223-02
Belief: The Christian Story
 
See Details
C. Anthony
Core
02/01 - 05/21
7/7/0
Lecture
CRN 26196
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 101B

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 101B

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 101B

   

CRN: 26196

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 101B
     (Common Good capacity: 64 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG)

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cara Anthony

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section journeys through the whole Christian story, from creation through the drama of sin and salvation to the hope for the age to come. It explores how Christian belief sheds light on contemporary issues such as food sustainability, racial justice, or human cloning.

4 Credits

200-L03
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Organ
CGoodCore
02/01 - 05/21
12/12/0
Lecture
CRN 23860
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

     

CRN: 23860

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Deborah Organ

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

223-L03
Belief: Ancient & Modern
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Organ
CGoodCore
02/01 - 05/21
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26157
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 201

     

CRN: 26157

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Deborah Organ

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

200-L04
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
Blended
B. Sain
Core
02/01 - 05/21
19/18/0
Lecture
CRN 26159
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
KOC 113

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26159

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Koch Commons 113

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Barbara Sain

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

223-L04
Belief: Ancient & Modern
 
Blended
B. Sain
Core
02/01 - 05/21
7/7/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26158
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
KOC 113

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26158

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Koch Commons 113

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Barbara Sain

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

200-L05
Christian Belief: Ancient/Cont
 
Blended
B. Sain
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 26193
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 201

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26193

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Barbara Sain

This course introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

223-L05
Belief: Ancient & Modern
 
Blended
B. Sain
Core
02/01 - 05/21
5/3/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26192
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 201

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26192

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Barbara Sain

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section introduces systematic theology, a discipline that tries to understand how Christian doctrines are interrelated with each other and with other beliefs about the world. It explores both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the most significant doctrines in Catholic and Protestant traditions, emphasizing the relationship of scripture, tradition, experience, and reason as sources for Christian theology. The course is structured on the classical "system" of the Nicene Creed, and will focus on the ongoing formation of the doctrines of God, Christ, the Spirit, creation, sin, salvation, and Church. Special emphasis will be given to the role of grace in history and human experience.

4 Credits

205-02
Old Testament
 
See Details
P. Niskanen
Core
02/01 - 05/21
25/25/0
Lecture
CRN 24836
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 25
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 101B

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 101B

     

CRN: 24836

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 101B
     (Common Good capacity: 64 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Paul Niskanen

An intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

221-02
Bible: Old Testament
 
See Details
P. Niskanen
Core
02/01 - 05/21
6/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26191
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 101B

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 101B

     

CRN: 26191

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 101B
     (Common Good capacity: 622 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG)

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Paul Niskanen

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section will involve students in an examination of biblical prophetic activity and prophetic texts within their ancient Near Eastern context. Biblical texts will include both narratives about the prophets, and collections of oracles in the prophetic books. The course includes an examination of the nature and function of prophetic activity from a cross-cultural perspective, the historical background of the prophets, as well as the literary forms and Israelite traditions utilized in the oracles. It will be seen that this background is essential to any discussion of the theology of the prophets.

4 Credits

205-W03
Old Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Gavrilyuk
Core
02/01 - 05/21
11/11/0
Lecture
CRN 24837
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 111

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 111

     

CRN: 24837

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 111
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

An intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

221-W03
Bible: Old Testament
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
E. Gavrilyuk
Core
02/01 - 05/21
9/10/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26113
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 111

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MCH 111

     

CRN: 26113

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: McNeely Hall 111
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the Old Testament in its ancient Israelite context and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

205-W04
Old Testament
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
E. Gavrilyuk
Core
02/01 - 05/21
15/11/0
Lecture
CRN 24838
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 109

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 109

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 109

   

CRN: 24838

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 109
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

An intensive reading and discussion of the Old Testament, also known as the Hebrew scriptures. The course investigates methods of biblical interpretation and the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context. In addition, this course explores the Old Testament as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern) in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

221-W04
Bible: Old Testament
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
E. Gavrilyuk
Core
02/01 - 05/21
5/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26117
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 109

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 109

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 109

   

CRN: 26117

In Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: McNeely Hall 109
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Eugenia Gavrilyuk

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the Old Testament in its ancient Israelite context and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

210-L05
New Testament
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Landry
Core
02/01 - 05/21
18/17/0
Lecture
CRN 23783
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online

   

CRN: 23783

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  David Landry

This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

221-L05
Bible: New Testament
 
MWF 9:35 am - 10:40 am
D. Landry
Core
02/01 - 05/21
7/7/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26072
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online

 

9:35 am
10:40 am
Online

   

CRN: 26072

Online: Some Synchronous | Topics Lecture 2

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

210-L06
New Testament
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
D. Landry
Core
02/01 - 05/21
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 24819
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   

CRN: 24819

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  David Landry

This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

221-L06
Bible: New Testament
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
D. Landry
Core
02/01 - 05/21
5/5/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26078
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26078

Online: Some Synchronous | Topics Lecture 2

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Landry

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the student in an intensive historical, literary, and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles.

4 Credits

210-W07
New Testament
 
Blended
C. Cory
Core
02/01 - 05/21
8/9/0
Lecture
CRN 24818
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 222

           
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 24818

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222
     (Common Good capacity: 12 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Cathy Cory

This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

210-W7A
New Testament
 
Blended
C. Cory
Core
02/01 - 05/21
11/11/0
Lecture
CRN 26089
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 222

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26089

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 222
     (Common Good capacity: 12 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Cathy Cory

This course involves the student in an intensive historical, literary and theological reading of major portions of the New Testament in the Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts and from the perspective of modern methods of biblical interpretation. In addition, the course explores the New Testament as a foundational document for modern Christian traditions in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship and in the articulation of moral principles. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

221-W07
Bible: New Testament
 
Blended
C. Cory
Core
02/01 - 05/21
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26079
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
Online

           
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26079

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cathy Cory

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

4 Credits

221-W7A
Bible: New Testament
 
Blended
C. Cory
Core
02/01 - 05/21
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26088
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

8:15 am
9:20 am
JRC 222

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26088

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center 222
     (Common Good capacity: 12 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Cathy Cory

This course involves the student in a literary, historical, and theological reading of major portions of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) or New Testament. All sections explore the Bible as a foundational document for the Jewish and Christian traditions (both ancient and modern), examining to varying degrees how the texts have been used in the development of doctrine, in the expressions of worship, and in the articulation of moral principles. The course also examines elements of power and privilege, both with respect to the social and political positions of the authors and the settings in which the texts were written, and also with respect to how the biblical texts have been appropriated in different time periods and by different communities (in history and today), and used as vehicles of both oppression and liberation. The course investigates the literature and theologies of the Israelite people in their ancient Near Eastern context, or in their Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts, applying modern methods of biblical interpretation. Students may examine a specialized biblical topic of the instructor’s choosing such as the Pentateuch, historical literature, wisdom literature, prophetic literature, or apocalyptic literature in the Hebrew Bible; or the Gospels, the Letters of Paul, or apocalyptic literature in the New Testament. Courses might focus on a particular theme, such as justice in the Bible, or how Jesus approached forgiveness or nonviolence. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

4 Credits

215-L03
Christian Morality
 
Blended
R. Koerpel
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
21/18/0
Lecture
CRN 24147
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

N/A
N/A
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 24147

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Robert Koerpel

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

225-L03
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
Blended
R. Koerpel
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26215
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 205

 

N/A
N/A
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26215

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 205
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”

4 Credits

215-L04
Christian Morality
 
Blended
R. Koerpel
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
17/16/0
Lecture
CRN 24148
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 204

 

N/A
N/A
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 24148

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Robert Koerpel

Justice and Peace

4 Credits

225-L04
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
Blended
R. Koerpel
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
8/5/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26216
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
MHC 204

 

N/A
N/A
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26216

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 1

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”

4 Credits

215-L05
Christian Morality
 
See Details
A. Levad
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
18/18/0
Lecture
CRN 26359
4 Cr.
Size: 18
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26359

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Amy Levad

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

225-L05
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
See Details
A. Levad
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
7/7/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26217
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26217

Online: Some Synchronous | Topics Lecture 1

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Levad

This course explores principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to understanding the human person; the significance of love, justice, and commitment to the common good in Christian moral life; and the role of the believing community in its relation to culture. Topics might include sex, marriage, and family; crime, justice, and forgiveness; war, peace, and revolution; immigration; environmental sustainability and animal rights; poverty and economic justice, among others. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

4 Credits

215-L06
Christian Morality
 
See Details
A. Levad
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
19/20/0
Lecture
CRN 26360
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26360

Online: Some Synchronous | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Amy Levad

This course is an introduction to the principles, methods and topics of Christian theological ethics. The following themes will be addressed: the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making (both individual and social); the contribution of the Christian tradition to the understanding of the human person (including freedom, sin, conscience, character and grace); the role of the believing community in its relation to culture; and the connection of worship and spirituality to the Christian moral life. Some application will be made to selected issues in personal, professional and social ethics. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

225-L06
Faith & Ethics: Love & Justice
 
See Details
A. Levad
EVMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
6/6/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26218
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
10:40 am
Online

         
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26218

Online: Some Synchronous | Topics Lecture 1

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Environmental Studies Approved
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Levad

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.”

4 Credits

220-L01
Early Christian Theology
 
Online
M. DelCogliano
Core
02/01 - 05/21
19/18/0
Lecture
CRN 24822
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 24822

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Mark DelCogliano

A theological and historical introduction to the origins and development of the Christian church from the first to the fifth centuries. Special attention will be given to the historical emergence of Christian doctrines, creeds and canon; the formation of Christian understandings of the human person; the development of liturgical and sacramental traditions; and the interaction of Christianity with other ancient cultures. Contemporary approaches to the study of Christian origins will be emphasized. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

222-L01
History: Early Christian Theo
 
Online
M. DelCogliano
Core
02/01 - 05/21
6/7/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26125
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26125

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 1

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core."

4 Credits

220-L02
Early Christian Theology
 
Online
M. DelCogliano
Core
02/01 - 05/21
17/17/0
Lecture
CRN 26127
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26127

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Mark DelCogliano

A theological and historical introduction to the origins and development of the Christian church from the first to the fifth centuries. Special attention will be given to the historical emergence of Christian doctrines, creeds and canon; the formation of Christian understandings of the human person; the development of liturgical and sacramental traditions; and the interaction of Christianity with other ancient cultures. Contemporary approaches to the study of Christian origins will be emphasized. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

222-L02
History: Early Christian Theo
 
Online
M. DelCogliano
Core
02/01 - 05/21
8/8/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26126
4 Cr.
Size: 8
Enrolled: 8
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26126

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 1

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark DelCogliano

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.

4 Credits

222-W05
History: Reformation
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
S. Jordon
MUMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
10/10/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 26156
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26156

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 3

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Shirley Jordon

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves an investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. We will also examine the Roman Catholic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women.

4 Credits

240-W05
Prot & Catholic Reformation
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
S. Jordon
MUMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
10/10/0
Lecture
CRN 23966
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 23966

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Music in Faith Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Shirley Jordon

An investigation of the origins of the Protestant tradition through the writings of Martin Luther, John Calvin, Ulrich Zwingli, and the Radical reformers, among others. This course also examines the Roman Catholic response, especially as articulated by Ignatius of Loyola, Teresa of Avila, and the Council of Trent. Attention will be given to the theological issues which emerged, as well as views on marriage and family life, religious and political authority, and the status of women. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

222-L04
History: Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
7/7/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26138
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 202

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26138

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202
     (Common Good capacity: 14 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

222-L4A
History: Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
7/6/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26144
4 Cr.
Size: 7
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 202

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26144

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202
     (Common Good capacity: 14 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

This course introduces students to a historical examination of a particular period or periods of Christian history, such as the emergence and development of the Christian Church in the early centuries, the Middle Ages, or the period of the Reformation, or students may delve into a specialized topic in Christian history with a focus on a topic of the instructor’s choosing, such as Christianity and Nazism, the Second Vatican Council, contemporary Catholic theologians, etc. Pre-requisite: THEO 100

4 Credits

230-L04
Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
6/6/0
Lecture
CRN 26142
4 Cr.
Size: 6
Enrolled: 6
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 202

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26142

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202
     (Common Good capacity: 14 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Steven McMichael

A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

230-L4A
Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
5/5/0
Lecture
CRN 26147
4 Cr.
Size: 5
Enrolled: 5
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MHC 202

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26147

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 202
     (Common Good capacity: 14 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Steven McMichael

A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

222-L03
History: Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
2/2/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26128
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 2
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL01

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26128

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

222-L3A
History: Medieval History
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
3/3/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 26148
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL01

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26148

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steven McMichael

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section involves the study of the development of Christian theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims.

4 Credits

230-L03
Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
11/12/0
Lecture
CRN 26131
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 12
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL01

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26131

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Steven McMichael

A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

230-L3A
Medieval Theology
 
Blended
S. McMichael
Core
02/01 - 05/21
9/9/0
Lecture
CRN 26145
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
JRC LL01

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26145

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center LL01
     (Common Good capacity: 16 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing to learn

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Steven McMichael

A study of the development of Christian Theology from the fall of the Roman Empire until the Renaissance. Special attention will be given to the main themes of the classical Christian views of faith/reason, grace/nature, God/creation in the theologies of such theologians as St. Thomas Aquinas and St. Bonaventure. Other themes that may be treated: the role of monasticism and mendicant life; medieval saints such as St. Francis of Assisi and Catherine of Siena, women's spirituality, mysticism, liturgical developments, religious art and architecture, and the interaction of Christians with Jews and Muslims. Prerequisite: THEO 101

4 Credits

224-01
Bridges: Theology & Beauty
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. McInroy
MUMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
3/3/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 26204
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26204

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 8

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Music in Faith Minor Approved

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines a variety of theological approaches to aesthetic questions, both ancient and modern. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith.

4 Credits

300-D02
Signature: Theology & Beauty
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. McInroy
Core
02/01 - 05/21
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 26379
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26379

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 8

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing in the Discipline

2020 Core:
     Signature Work
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines a variety of theological approaches to aesthetic questions, both ancient and modern. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith.

4 Credits

452-01
Theology & Beauty
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. McInroy
MUMRCore
02/01 - 05/21
27/26/0
Lecture
CRN 26205
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26205

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Music in Faith Minor Approved

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Mark McInroy

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course

4 Credits

224-41
HONORS Bridges: Theo & Beauty
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
M. McInroy
HonorCore
02/01 - 05/21
3/3/0
Topics Lecture 8
CRN 26206
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26206

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 8

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Honors Course

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Mark McInroy

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section examines a variety of theological approaches to aesthetic questions, both ancient and modern. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith.

4 Credits

452-41
HONORS Theology & Beauty
 
MWF 1:35 pm - 2:40 pm
M. McInroy
HonorCore
02/01 - 05/21
17/17/0
Lecture
CRN 26207
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online

   

CRN: 26207

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Honors Course

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Mark McInroy

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. Is beauty "in the eye of the beholder"? Are "beauty" and "prettiness" synonymous? Are "beauty" and "ugliness" opposites? Might beauty still be considered a transcendental aspect of being along with the true and the good? Is it possible that Beauty is a name for God, or a means by which God reveals God's self in the created order? This course examines a variety of theological approaches to these questions, both ancient and modern. It also explores the implications of varying answers to these questions for the arts, and for lives of faith. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course

4 Credits

224-02
Bridges: Theology & Politics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Hollerich
Core
02/01 - 05/21
12/10/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26208
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

     

CRN: 26208

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 1

Online

THEO: Theology (UG)

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

4 Credits

300-D04
Signature: Faith & Politics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Hollerich
Core
02/01 - 05/21
2/0/0
Topics Lecture 12
CRN 26380
4 Cr.
Size: 2
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

     

CRN: 26380

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 12

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing in the Discipline

2020 Core:
     Signature Work
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Hollerich

Open to all students, not only theology majors, the signature work in theology course is designed as a capstone experience to integrate a student’s entire college career, bringing fullness of expression to the University’s efforts through the liberal arts core to educate morally responsible leaders who, grounded in the Catholic intellectual tradition, think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good. There are two types of signature work in theology: signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges, or signature work that is focused on faith and the professions. Signature work that is focused on contemporary challenges will invite students to conduct research and/or experiential learning around matters of pressing concern according to the instructor’s discretion, such as fostering understanding across lines of religious difference; cultivating interfaith leadership; searching for beauty; establishing justice and peace; or responding to contemporary challenges such as environmental sustainability, immigration, or mass incarceration. Signature work that is focused on vocation may explore the integration of theology with a profession of the instructor’s choosing, such as the management professions, the legal professions, the medical professions, the public health professions, the psychological professions, or the engineering professions. Prerequisites: THEO 100 and a student must have at least 80 credits completed.

4 Credits

433-02
Theology & Politics
 
TR 8:00 am - 9:40 am
M. Hollerich
Core
02/01 - 05/21
17/17/0
Lecture
CRN 26210
4 Cr.
Size: 17
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

 

8:00 am
9:40 am
Online

     

CRN: 26210

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Michael Hollerich

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. A theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course

4 Credits

224-03
Bridges: Theology & Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
Core
02/01 - 05/21
4/4/0
Topics Lecture 1
CRN 26211
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 4
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

CRN: 26211

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 1

Online

THEO: Theology (UG)

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

4 Credits

300-D05
Signature: Theo & Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
Core
02/01 - 05/21
3/0/0
Topics Lecture 12
CRN 26381
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 0
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

CRN: 26381

Online: Sync Distributed | Topics Lecture 12

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing in the Discipline

2020 Core:
     Signature Work
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Hollerich

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section is a theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion.

4 Credits

433-03
Theology & Politics
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Hollerich
Core
02/01 - 05/21
24/21/0
Lecture
CRN 26212
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
Online

     

CRN: 26212

Online: Sync Distributed | Lecture

Online

THEO: Theology (UG)

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Michael Hollerich

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. A theological investigation of changing relationships between Christianity and the political order, principally in religious terms as understood by Christians themselves but also from the vantage point of government. Emphasis in the first half of the course is on the foundational events of the New Testament and the early Christian era, and in the second half on Christianity's experience with secular and democratic modernity in America. The aim of the course is to measure the effect, in changing historical contexts, of persecution, establishment, and disestablishment, on a religion which professes both to be rooted in transcendent reality, and to have direct implications for life in this world. Primary readings from scripture, ancient and modern theology, speeches, sermons, Supreme Court decisions, and political, sociological and religious reflections on the American experiment with democracy and freedom of religion. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course

4 Credits

224-W06
Bridges: Theology and Film
 
Blended
R. Koerpel
Core
TBD
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 4
CRN 26200
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

02/01 - 02/06:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

02/07 - 02/13:
NA
NA
Online

02/14 - 02/20:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

02/21 - 02/27:
NA
NA
Online

02/25 - 03/06:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

03/07 - 03/13:
NA
NA
Online

03/14 - 03/20:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

03/21 - 03/27:
NA
NA
Online

04/04 - 04/10:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

04/11 - 04/17:
NA
NA
Online

04/18 - 04/24:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

04/25 - 05/01:
NA
NA
Online

05/02 - 05/08:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

05/09 - 05/15:
NA
NA
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26200

Blended Online & In-Person | Topics Lecture 4

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

2020 Core:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Integ/Humanities
(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Robert Koerpel

Theology courses numbered 221-229 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students on the “old core.” This section explores the relationship between theology and film by teaching students the skills they need to be critical theological viewers of films. This course will operate under the assumption that, because films function as vehicles for ideas, they offer fruitful ground for theological reflection.

4 Credits

489-W07
Theology & Film
 
Blended
R. Koerpel
Core
TBD
19/19/0
Lecture
CRN 26201
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su
   

02/01 - 02/05:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

02/07 - 02/13:
NA
NA
Online

02/14 - 02/20:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

02/21 - 02/27:
NA
NA
Online

02/28 - 03/06:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

03/07 - 03/13:
NA
NA
Online

03/14 - 03/20:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

03/21 - 03/27:
NA
NA
Online

04/04 - 04/10:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

04/11 - 04/17:
NA
NA
Online

04/18 - 04/24:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

04/25 - 05/01:
NA
NA
Online

05/02 - 05/08:
5:30 pm
9:15 pm
MHC 206

05/09 - 05/15:
NA
NA
Online

       
+ asynchronous coursework

CRN: 26201

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

THEO: Theology (UG):
     Writing Intensive

Old Core:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

  Robert Koerpel

This section explores the relationship between theology and film by teaching students the skills they need to be critical theological viewers of films. This course will operate under the assumption that, because films function as vehicles for ideas, they offer fruitful ground for theological reflection.

4 Credits

224-W07
Bridges: Theology & Science
 
MW 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
B. Zuelke
Core
02/01 - 05/21
1/1/0
Topics Lecture 6
CRN 26202
4 Cr.
Size: 1
Enrolled: 1
Waitlisted: 0
02/01 - 05/21
M T W Th F Sa Su