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Results

Enrollment and waitlist data for current and upcoming courses refresh every 10 minutes; all other information as of 6:00 AM.


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AMCD: Amer Culture & Difference

200-L01
American Culture:Power/Identit
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Lawrence
AMCDFAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 27916
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 126

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
JRC 126

     

Subject: Amer Culture & Difference (AMCD)

CRN: 27916

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 126
     (Common Good capacity: 194 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  David Lawrence

AMCD 200, American Culture:Power/Identity: (This course was originally titled ACST 200: Introduction to American Culture and Difference; the name change has been submitted as an information item to the UCC). In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop.

4 Credits

ARTH: Art History (UG)

202-L01
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCoreCGood 
01/31 - 05/20
27/27/0
Lecture
CRN 29475
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
9:15 pm
OEC 414

           

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 29475

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

202-L02
History of Street Art
 
Blended
H. Shirey
AMCDCoreCGood 
01/31 - 05/20
27/27/0
Lecture
CRN 29476
4 Cr.
Size: 27
Enrolled: 27
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
OEC 414

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Art History (UG) (ARTH)

CRN: 29476

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 414
     (Common Good capacity: 36 participants)

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Heather Shirey

Street art—including graffiti, murals, and other installations in public space—provides expressive avenues for marginalized voices, shapes urban space, and promotes competing visions of community development. In contrast to art that is created for museums or the commercial art market, street art is uniquely positioned to engage with social issues from a critical perspective. This class will involve an analysis of street art projects from the United States, situated in comparison with projects from around the world. Topics to explored include the history of street art over time (from its origins in graffiti to contemporary mural festivals); the impetus for street art in communities in the USA and globally; models for creating, preserving, and presenting street art; the institutionalization of street art; street art as it relates to diversity and inclusion; and, ultimately, the potential for street art to play a role in social change.

4 Credits

CATH: Catholic Studies (UG)

340-03
Chrch&Culture:Misn of Engineer
 
See Details
M. Naughton
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
21/21/0
Lecture
CRN 29037
4 Cr.
Size: 21
Enrolled: 21
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
FDC 317

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
FDC 317

     

Subject: Catholic Studies (UG) (CATH)

CRN: 29037

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Facilities & Design Center 317
     (Common Good capacity: 46 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Naughton, Deb Besser

This course provides an investigation into the ways in which Catholicism is inherently social and ecclesial. Its specific focus is on the Christian engagement with the world. The course's framework will be taken from the analysis of society into three spheres of action (culture, politics, and economics) as described in Centesimus annus. We will examine the ways that Revelation, the sacramental life, and the teachings of the Church call Catholics to seek holiness and to witness to their faith in the world. Specific topics may include social and economic justice, politics and public policy, lay and religious apostolates, education, and marriage and family. Course materials may include resources from philosophy, theology, history, economics, and political science.

4 Credits

COMM: Communication Studies

328-D01
Comm of Race, Class & Gender
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
D. Petersen
AMCDFAPXCoreWMST 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 27930
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 317

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 317

     

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 27930

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 317
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Debra Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities.

4 Credits

340-W01
Television Criticism
 
Online
P. Nettleton
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 29171
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 29171

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Pamela Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

4 Credits

340-W02
Television Criticism
 
Online
P. Nettleton
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 29820
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 29820

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Pamela Nettleton

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

4 Credits

ECON: Economics (UG)

398-01
Economic Inequality
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
T. Schipper
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/18/0
Lecture
CRN 27879
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 319

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 319

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 319

   

Subject: Economics (UG) (ECON)

CRN: 27879

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 319
     (Common Good capacity: 35 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Tyler Schipper

Economic Inequality focuses on two types of inequality often studied by economists: income and wealth inequality. The course will illustrate how inequality in the U.S. has evolved over time, and how it compares to other countries. It puts particular emphasis on using data and modeling to explain the origins of inequality and explore the impacts of policies aimed to address it. The course highlights how inequality relates to demographics such as race, gender, and education. Finally, it asks hard questions about whether inequality is unavoidable, whether it matters, and what can be done about it. Prerequisites: ECON 251 and 252

4 Credits

EDUC: Education (UG)

329-01
Diverse Learners & Families
 
See Details
K. Campbell
FASTCore 
01/31 - 05/20
25/24/0
Lecture
CRN 29242
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

9:55 am
11:35 am
MOH 417

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MOH 417

       

Subject: Education (UG) (EDUC)

CRN: 29242

In Person | Lecture

Minneapolis: Opus Hall - Minneapolis 417
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kathlene Campbell, Eleni Roulis

This course is designed to equip prospective teachers with the knowledge, instructional practices, and dispositions to successfully manage diverse classrooms, using their understanding of multiple learning modalities and all types of diversity to promote all students' personal and academic achievement. The course engages candidates with issues such as race, class, gender, exceptionality, oppression, and discrimination while examining the crucial role of educators in influencing positive, systematic change for social justice.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

203-W04
Gangsters, Geeks, & Spies
 
Blended
C. Santiago
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 28702
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 307

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
Online 1

 

1:35 pm
2:40 pm
OEC 307

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28702

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 307
     (Common Good capacity: 30 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Chris Santiago

This course explores fiction, music, poetry, video games, graphic novels, and other forms of media that explode myths about Asian & Asian American culture. We’ll meet Amadeus Cho, a teenaged genius who also happens to be the next Incredible Hulk, and Maika Halfwolf, the steampunk heroine of the Image comic MONSTRESS. We’ll read FRESH OFF THE BOAT, the memoir of a one-time thug who conquers the foodie world, and play BUTTERFLY SOUP, an interactive game about four queer girls in the Bay Area who to happen to love baseball and each other. We’ll unpack hip-hop lyrics by M.I.A., and crack the cultural codes in the standup comedy of Ali Wong and in Aziz Ansari’s Emmy Award-winning MASTER OF NONE. And we’ll decipher the testimony of the captain in the best-selling novel THE SYMPATHIZER, an ex-soldier who describes himself as “a spy, a sleeper, a spook, a man of two faces.” The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

203-W06
LGBTQ+ Literature
 
Blended
M. Hendrickx
AMCDCoreWMST 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 29169
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
OEC 210

         
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 29169

Blended Online & In-Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive
     WGSS Major Approved
     WGSS Minor Approved

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Melissa Hendrickx

This course will primarily focus on LGBTQ+ literature from the Stonewall riots to the present-day. We will investigate whether this genre of literature has a particular aesthetic or shares common thematic elements. Special attention will be given to BIPOC writers and how LGBTQ+ writing disrupts common conventions of gender, sexuality, relationships, and identity, and the role that storytelling has played in the queer community. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement. Please note that ENGL 203 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 201, 202, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

390-L01
The Erdrichs: Native Amer Lit
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
L. Wilkinson
AMCDENGL*Core 
01/31 - 05/20
20/17/0
Lecture
CRN 28720
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
OEC 212

   

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 28720

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 212
     (Common Good capacity: 20 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Context and Convergences
     English Diversity Req.
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Liz Wilkinson

In this iteration of ENGL 390 Major Literary Figures, students will study the fiction, poetry, and essay writing of Louise Erdrich, winner of the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize for her novels, and Heid Erdrich, winner of the American Book Award for her poetry. Louise and Heid, sisters, are members of the Turtle Mountain Band of Ojibwe, and are two of the most prominent American writers of our time. Likely texts to be examined include Tracks, The Last Report on the Miracles of Little No Horse, and The Night Watchman (winner of the Pulitzer) by Louise Erdrich, and National Monuments, Little Big Bully, and Sister Nations (an anthology of Native women’s writing) by Heid Erdrich (winner of the National Book Award). Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

HIST: History

264-01
Hist of Medicine & Health Care
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
S. Hausmann
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
16/16/0
Lecture
CRN 29179
4 Cr.
Size: 16
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 118

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 118

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MCH 118

   

Subject: History (HIST)

CRN: 29179

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 118
     (Common Good capacity: 28 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Steve Hausmann

This course explores how people have thought about bodies, illness, and medical treatment over the last several centuries, both in the American context and in other parts of the world. Although the geographic and temporal coverage of this course might vary depending on the instructor’s expertise, we will investigate the history of several different medical epistemologies before narrowing in on the gradually developed hegemony that allopathic or Western medicine came to hold within the United States and Europe. In the American context, we will inquire about indigenous concepts of health and healing, pandemics and disease during the colonial era, the proliferation of medical disciplines during the nineteenth century, and the professionalization and privatization of health care in the twentieth and twenty first centuries that give rise to the disparities in access and outcomes that we see today. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.

4 Credits

JPST: Justice & Peace Studies

280-W01
Active Nonviolence
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
A. Finnegan
AMCDCoreFAPX 
01/31 - 05/20
25/26/0
Lecture
CRN 26791
4 Cr.
Size: 25
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 210

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 26791

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 210
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

4 Credits

375-D01
Conflict Analysis & Transform
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
A. Finnegan
AMCDFAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/16/0
Lecture
CRN 28330
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
MHC 204

     

Subject: Justice & Peace Studies (JPST)

CRN: 28330

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Amy Finnegan

An introduction to issues surrounding conflict and the resolution of conflict in today's world focusing primarily on its contextual manifestation at the international, regional and intrastate levels. The course will explore important structural, social and psychological explanations of conflict. Attention will be given to ethnic and nationalist themes surrounding conflicts and their resolution at the intrastate and international levels. The course will examine how different types of intervention affect conflicts (the media, force, other types of third party intervention). Effective methods that foster an environment conducive to resolving or managing disputes will be studied. As part of the final task, the course will critically study how institutions such as power-sharing arrangements, federalism, and the rule of law figure into establishing a lasting basis for peaceful co-existence. For Justice and Peace Studies majors doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, the course will complement JPST 370 Conflict Mediation, but there are no prerequisites and the course is open to students in other majors.

4 Credits

MGMT: Management

385-01
Inclusive Leadership
 
MW 1:35 pm - 3:10 pm
R. Hart
Core 
03/28 - 05/20
35/35/0
Lecture
CRN 28905
2 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 35
Waitlisted: 0
03/28 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 232

 

1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 232

       

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 28905

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 232
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Rama Hart

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Notes: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388. We are reserving a portion of seats in this course for students in the Leadership and Management concentration, the General Business concentration and the Human Resources Management concentration.

2 Credits

385-02
Inclusive Leadership
 
MW 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
K. Donnelly
Core 
03/28 - 05/20
35/36/0
Lecture
CRN 29726
2 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 36
Waitlisted: 0
03/28 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 234

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 234

       

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 29726

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 234
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kris Donnelly

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

2 Credits

385-03
Inclusive Leadership
 
MW 5:30 pm - 7:15 pm
K. Donnelly
Core 
01/31 - 03/18
35/32/0
Lecture
CRN 29794
2 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 32
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 03/18
M T W Th F Sa Su

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 234

 

5:30 pm
7:15 pm
MCH 234

       

Subject: Management (MGMT)

CRN: 29794

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 234
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Kris Donnelly

Leaders, both with and without formal management titles, need to appreciate the diverse people internal and external to their organizations and society at large. It is critical that leaders step up to design and deliver effective programs of inclusion in their organizations. Culturally competent leaders think critically about these programs and practice inclusion at individual, interpersonal, team, organization, and community levels. This requires foundational knowledge, skills, and attitudes applied in diverse domestic and global contexts. This course introduces a range of perspectives to explore topics including, but not limited to, human diversity; inclusive cultures; social identity and perception; power and privilege; and models and paradigms for interpersonal and organizational inclusion. Prerequisites: MGMT 200 or MGMT 305 and Junior standing. Note: Students who receive credit for MGMT 385 may not receive credit for MGMT 388

2 Credits

MKTG: Marketing

488-01
Multicultural Marketing
 
See Details
M. Purvis
Core 
TBD
36/35/0
Lecture
CRN 29498
2 Cr.
Size: 36
Enrolled: 35
Waitlisted: 0
M T W Th F Sa Su

01/31 - 03/18:
1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 110

 

01/31 - 03/18:
1:35 pm
3:10 pm
MCH 110

 

03/18:
1:35 pm
2:40 pm
MCH 110

   

Subject: Marketing (MKTG)

CRN: 29498

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: McNeely Hall 110
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Minerva Purvis, Nakeisha Lewis

The purpose of this course will be to help you appreciate the presence and understand the nuisances and similarities of various subcultures within the United States. From targeting and segmenting customers to developing partnerships, we will discuss how these may impact American marketing practices and trends. Realizing that a subculture is any group that shares a set of attitudes, values and goals, this course will consider not only ethnic subcultures but religious, sexual orientation & gender identity, ability, and generational subcultures. You will be exposed to concepts such as cultural capital, intercultural penetration, intersectionality, historical context and other concepts of culture and identity as you learn how you and organizations can effectively and responsibly engage with multiple diverse stakeholders. Prerequisite: MKTG 200 [DISJ Flag Approval Pending]

2 Credits

MUSC: Music Classes (UG)

230-W01
Music of the United States
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
S. Schmalenberger
AMCDCore 
01/31 - 05/20
20/19/0
Lecture
CRN 28693
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
BEC LL03

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
BEC LL03

     

Subject: Music Classes (UG) (MUSC)

CRN: 28693

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Brady Educational Center LL03
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     Writing Intensive

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Sarah Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of music in the United States within its historical, cultural, and sociological contexts. The course will develop skills in critical listening analysis using appropriate musical terminology, to describe both aural and written traditions of music. Repertoire to be explored include homeland traditions of cultures and population groups brought over through migration/immigration, blends of popular and concert traditions, and new and emerging styles unique to the United States. Historical, cultural, and social contexts will facilitate and understanding of how music reflects particular identities, ideas, values, and issues among population groups in the United States.

4 Credits

PHIL: Philosophy

230-01
Disability and Human Dignity
 
TR 3:25 pm - 5:00 pm
G. Frost
Core 
01/31 - 05/20
24/24/0
Lecture
CRN 29074
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 24
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

 

3:25 pm
5:00 pm
JRC 201

     

Subject: Philosophy (PHIL)

CRN: 29074

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: John Roach Center 201
     (Common Good capacity: 32 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Gloria Frost

This course is a comprehensive introduction to the most pressing issues and questions concerning disability. Students will encounter and critically evaluate longstanding stereotypes and biases about the disadvantages of disability. This course examines disability primarily from a philosophical perspective, yet readings from other disciplines will also be used throughout the course. Some of the central questions examined in the course include: What is disability? Is disability merely a medical condition? In what ways do societal barriers disable? How does economic class impact access to educational, medical and social resources? Does disability itself make a person worse off or is it only social stigmatization and lack of accommodation that makes the lives of those with disabilities worse? How have those with disabilities been disadvantaged in the US? What is the basis for human dignity? What conceptual frameworks allow us to uphold the dignity of those with severe disabilities? Which behaviors and assumptions threaten the equality and dignity of those with disabilities? Prerequisites: PHIL 110 or 115 or 197.

4 Credits

SOCI: Sociology

280-01
Hate Crimes
 
TR 1:30 pm - 3:10 pm
J. Hodge
AMCDCGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
30/30/0
Lecture
CRN 29191
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 30
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 206

 

1:30 pm
3:10 pm
OEC 206

     

Subject: Sociology (SOCI)

CRN: 29191

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 206
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     CommGood/Changemaking
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Social Justice

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Jessica Hodge

Although hate crimes have long existed in the United States, the term "hate crime" is a relatively new addition to the social, political, and legal domains. This course examines the institutionalization of hate crime law within our legal system and explores the complexities surrounding the development and enforcement of hate crime laws. This course also examines the causes, manifestations, and consequences of hate crimes, and the effectivess of formal and informal social controls in combating these crimes.

4 Credits

350-01
Social Inequality:Priv & Power
 
MWF 8:15 am - 9:20 am
L. Fischer
AMCDEdTrnCGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
30/13/0
Lecture
CRN 26857
4 Cr.
Size: 30
Enrolled: 13
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 454

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 454

 

8:15 am
9:20 am
OEC 454

   

Subject: Sociology (SOCI)

CRN: 26857

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: O'Shaughnessy Education Center 454
     (Common Good capacity: 45 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     School of Ed Transfer Course
     CommGood/Community-Engaged

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Standing

4 Credits

SOWK: Social Work (UG)

240-01
People & Environment: Theories
 
TR 9:55 am - 11:35 am
M. Lundquist
CoreSUST 
01/31 - 05/20
35/26/0
Lecture
CRN 27918
4 Cr.
Size: 35
Enrolled: 26
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 209

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
MHC 209

     

Subject: Social Work (UG) (SOWK)

CRN: 27918

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 209
     (Common Good capacity: 40 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Enviro Sustainability
     FYE Human Well-Being
     Sustainability (SUST)

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Melissa Lundquist

This a theory-driven course focusing on metacognition- training students to think about the way we think. The course takes a multidisciplinary approach to theoretical knowledge, introducing students to many ways of understanding how humans behave in, impact, and are impacted by multiple environments. Students learn to apply theories to understand human behavior in regard to their social and natural environments as well as reciprocal impact of humans and their environments. Theories are examined through a multidimensional framework constituting biological, psychological, spiritual, socio-cultural, political, environmental, and economic factors. Emphasis is on these factors within and between multiple systems: individual, family, small group, organization, community, and society, including political, economic, and natural systems. The course consists of five modules: interpersonal relations and empowerment, social systems, political and economic systems, social and environmental justice, and multiculturalism. The course investigates the multiple dimensions and intersections of diversity including gender, race/ethnicity, age, religion, ability, sexual orientation, nationality, and global and international perspectives. Students leave the class with a holistic understanding of the human experience within the environments that surround them. Recommended prerequisite or concurrent registration: SOWK 181 (or 281 under the old course number); Required Prerequisites: PSYC 202, or consent of the program director. 

4 Credits

THEO: Theology (UG)

226-04
Spirituality:ChristianMarriage
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
M. Spencer
CoreFAST 
01/31 - 05/20
11/11/0
Topics Lecture 3
CRN 28688
4 Cr.
Size: 11
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28688

In Person | Topics Lecture 3

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     Family Studies Approved
     FYE Human Well-Being

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Marguerite Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

4 Credits

423-04
Christian Marriage
 
MWF 10:55 am - 12:00 pm
M. Spencer
CoreFAST 
01/31 - 05/20
19/19/0
Lecture
CRN 28689
4 Cr.
Size: 19
Enrolled: 19
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

 

10:55 am
12:00 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28689

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     Family Studies Major Approved
     Family Studies Minor Approved
     Family Studies Approved
     FYE Human Well-Being

  Marguerite Spencer

This section is designed to acquaint students with the theology of Christian marriage, understood as covenant relationship and as sacrament, that is, an effective sign of God's love in our world. Primary though not exclusive emphasis will be on the Roman Catholic tradition. Students will also examine contemporary cultural attitudes toward sexuality, marriage, and the family in the light of Christian theology.

4 Credits

228-L03
Comparative: InterRel Encounte
 
Online
H. Gustafson
CGoodFAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
3/3/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 28453
4 Cr.
Size: 3
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28453

Online: Asynchronous | Topics Lecture 2

Online

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Hans Gustafson

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.” In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

4 Credits

468-L03
Interreligious Encounter
 
Online
H. Gustafson
CGoodFAPXCore 
01/31 - 05/20
22/22/0
Lecture
CRN 29323
4 Cr.
Size: 22
Enrolled: 22
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29323

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad
     UG Core Human Diversity

Other Requirements Met:
     CommGood/Changemaking
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing to learn

  Hans Gustafson

In the last half century religious diversity in the West has rapidly increased, bringing people from different religious traditions into daily contact. This has resulted in new conflicts, sometimes in violence, but also in new collaborations and friendships. Drawing on several approaches to interreligious conflict and relations, this course will examine the dynamic encounters that take place between and among people of different religious identities and ask students to reflect on their own role in religiously complex situations. Students will consider this interreligious reality and their role in it against the backdrop of their own individual relationship to spirituality, faith, and theology. To foster interreligious understanding beyond the classroom, students in this course will spend significant time outside the classroom directly engaging religious diversity. 

4 Credits

229-L01
Professions: Faith & Law
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. Spencer
CoreLSMRCGood 
01/31 - 05/20
9/7/0
Topics Lecture 2
CRN 28582
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28582

In Person | Topics Lecture 2

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     FYE Social Justice
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Marguerite Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

300-D05
Signature: Faith & Law
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. Spencer
LSMRCGoodCore 
01/31 - 05/20
4/3/0
Lecture
CRN 28674
4 Cr.
Size: 4
Enrolled: 3
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 28674

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
      AND Signature Work

Other Requirements Met:
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing in the Discipline

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Marguerite Spencer

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits

436-L01
Chrstian Fath & Legal Profes
 
MWF 12:15 pm - 1:20 pm
M. Spencer
CoreLSMRCGood 
01/31 - 05/20
12/10/0
Lecture
CRN 27432
4 Cr.
Size: 12
Enrolled: 10
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

 

12:15 pm
1:20 pm
MHC 204

   

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 27432

In Person | Lecture

St Paul: Murray-Herrick Campus Center 204
     (Common Good capacity: 25 participants)

Old Core Requirements Met:
     UG Core Faith/Catholic Trad

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Changemaking
     Legal Studies Minor Approved
     FYE Social Justice
     CommGood/Community-Engaged
     Writing to learn

  Marguerite Spencer

NOTE: This course is for students on the “old core.” Students on the new core should take any THEO 221-229 if they are choosing to take the third required course on philosophical and theological reasoning in Theology. If to work is to share in the creative activity of God, then what specific challenge does this pose for an attorney given the grinding realities of the legal profession? If to be a professional is to live out a tripartite relationship between self, client, and a higher standard, then how does an attorney determine, much less respond to such a standard? Through a close reading of a variety of theological texts, treaties, case studies and rules of professional conduct, this course will address these questions and, in so doing, attempt to fashion a paradigm for the Christian practice of law. Within this paradigm, emphasis will be placed on the meaning of justice, law, rights and responsibilities. An ethic of care that fosters the development of a compassionate world and a common life will be emphasized. Prerequisite: one 200-level or 300-level THEO course

4 Credits

229-03
Professions: Faith & Engineer
 
See Details
M. Naughton
JPMRSMMRCore 
01/31 - 05/20
9/9/0
Topics Lecture 4
CRN 29448
4 Cr.
Size: 9
Enrolled: 9
Waitlisted: 0
01/31 - 05/20
M T W Th F Sa Su
 

9:55 am
11:35 am
FDC 317

 

9:55 am
11:35 am
FDC 317

     

Subject: Theology (UG) (THEO)

CRN: 29448

In Person | Topics Lecture 4

St Paul: Facilities & Design Center 317
     (Common Good capacity: 46 participants)

2020 Core Requirements Met:
      Phil/Theo
          OR
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Justice and Peace Approved
     Sci/Medicine/Soc Minor Approve

(2020 Core Planning Guide)

  Michael Naughton, Deb Besser

Theology courses numbered 221-229+300 are reserved for students on the new core curriculum. If this section of the class appears to have very few seats, it is because the rest of the seats in the classroom will be occupied by students in the equivalent course on the “old core.”

4 Credits


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