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COMM: Communication Studies

105-W01
Communication in Workplace
 
Online
P. Nettleton
Core 
05/29 - 07/11
24/20/0
Lecture
CRN 30304
4 Cr.
Size: 24
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
05/29 - 07/11
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Communication Studies (COMM)

CRN: 30304

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

  Pamela Nettleton

Introduction to basic communication theories and skills as they pertain to the business setting. Text, lecture, class discussion and exercises, and individual and group presentations will better prepare students to become more effective communicators at work. The course will focus on presentational skills, dyadic communication and interviewing, and group communication.

4 Credits

ENGL: English (UG)

201-W01
The American Short Story
 
Online
K. Larson
Core 
05/29 - 07/11
20/17/0
Lecture
CRN 30336
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 17
Waitlisted: 0
05/29 - 07/11
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 30336

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     FYE Cultural, Social Transf
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     FYE Social Justice
     Writing Intensive

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Kelli Larson

Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and speak to our future. In keeping with our diverse American heritage, stories have been chosen from a broad cross-section of literary and cultural traditions. Alongside canonical authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Ernest Hemingway, we read the works of Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Louise Erdrich, Kate Chopin, and others, examining how these diverse voices diverge from, resist, and transform the traditional American short story canon. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement; an Integrations in the Humanities requirement; and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Please note that ENGL 201 is non-repeatable; students wishing to take a second 200-level Texts in Conversation course will need to register for ENGL 202, 203, or 204. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

297-W01
Tpc: Intro to Italian Cinema
 
Online
S. Pane
FilmCore 
05/29 - 07/11
10/7/0
Lecture
CRN 30337
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
05/29 - 07/11
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 30337

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Film Studies History&Analysis
     Writing Intensive

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Literature/Writing

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Salvatore Pane

What is Italian cinema, and what do diverse directors like Fellini, Wertmüller, and Antonioni have to say about topics like fascism, love, and existential despair? Covering everything from neorealism to spaghetti westerns, this course will introduce students to film theory and demonstrate how to close-read movies and analyze them through writing. Potential films include LA DOLCE VITA, ROME OPEN CITY, and ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST. This course counts as an ENGL 200-level elective for English majors/minors, an ENGL 211+ allied course for select business majors, a History/Criticism/Theory course for Film Studies majors and minors, and a WAC Writing Intensive requirement. It also satisfies both the Integration in the Humanities and the Global Studies requirements. Prerequisites: None. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with FILM 297: there are 10 seats on the ENGL 297 side and 10 seats available on the FILM 298 side.

4 Credits

315-W01
Race, Sexuality, & Technology
 
Online
F. Sanchez
FAPXCore 
07/15 - 08/22
15/16/4
Lecture
CRN 30338
4 Cr.
Size: 15
Enrolled: 16
Waitlisted: 4
07/15 - 08/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: English (UG) (ENGL)

CRN: 30338

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Diversity/Soc Just AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Faith and Praxis Minor or Cert
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Fernando Sanchez

Historically, technical and professional writers have been principally responsible for contributing documentation to technological products and processes. Among the primary reasons for needing to create documentation are 1) ensuring that users understand and can work products safely and 2) complying with regulations that help to meet these goals. With that in mind, this course asks students to consider the following questions: How are individuals impacted by technological products and processes? Who is responsible for creating technological processes and products and what responsibilities they have to users who come from marginalized communities? How do marginalized users of technology usurp technological affordances to create, build, and communicate within a community network? Specifically, we will explore how women, LGBT individuals, and BIPOC communities are depicted, represented and affected by technologies when there is a disconnect between technology designers and users. In addition, students will come away with a better understanding of how marginalized communities circumvent constraints to accomplish their own goals through the use of technologies across various contexts (medical, health, communication, political, etc.). Exploring these domains will help students to pay better attention to user needs as they pursue post-graduation opportunities across such disciplines as writing, engineering, health, business, and law. This course satisfies a WAC Writing in to Learn requirement. an Integrations in the Humanities requirement, and the Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 or 190.

4 Credits

FILM: Film Studies

297-W01
Topic: Intro to Italian Cinema
 
Online
S. Pane
FilmCore 
05/29 - 07/11
10/7/0
Lecture
CRN 30453
4 Cr.
Size: 10
Enrolled: 7
Waitlisted: 0
05/29 - 07/11
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 30453

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Film Studies History&Analysis
     Writing Intensive

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Salvatore Pane

What is Italian cinema, and what do diverse directors like Fellini, Wertmüller, and Antonioni have to say about topics like fascism, love, and existential despair? Covering everything from neorealism to spaghetti westerns, this course will introduce students to film theory and demonstrate how to close-read movies and analyze them through writing. Potential films include LA DOLCE VITA, ROME OPEN CITY, and ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST. This course counts as an ENGL 200-level elective for English majors/minors, an ENGL 211+ allied course for select business majors, a History/Criticism/Theory course for Film Studies majors and minors, and a WAC Writing Intensive requirement. It also satisfies both the Integration in the Humanities and the Global Studies requirements. Prerequisites: None. NOTE: This course is cross-listed with ENGL 297: there are 10 seats on the FILM 297 side and 10 seats available on the ENGL 297 side.

4 Credits

300-W01
World Cinema
 
Online
C. Kachian
Core 
05/29 - 07/11
20/18/0
Online: Asynchronous
CRN 30454
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 18
Waitlisted: 0
05/29 - 07/11
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 30454

Online: Asynchronous | Online: Asynchronous

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Writing Intensive

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Christopher Kachian

Exploring cinematic innovation and legacy of some of the greatest directors around the globe. In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film. This course fulfills Global Perspectives, Integrations in the Humanities, and Writing Across the Curriculum requirements.

4 Credits

300-W03
World Cinema
 
Online
J. Snapko
FilmCore 
07/15 - 08/22
20/20/0
Lecture
CRN 30456
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 20
Waitlisted: 0
07/15 - 08/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Film Studies (FILM)

CRN: 30456

Online: Asynchronous | Lecture

Online

Core Requirements Met:
     Global Perspective AND Integ/Humanities
     

Other Requirements Met:
     Film Studies Major Approved
     Film Studies Minor Approved
     Writing Intensive

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Human Diversity

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  James Snapko

Exploring cinematic innovation and legacy of some of the greatest directors around the globe. In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film. This course fulfills Global Perspectives, Integrations in the Humanities, and Writing Across the Curriculum requirements.

4 Credits

MUSC: Music Classes (UG)

216-W01
USA Jazz: From Duke to Drake
 
Online
C. Kachian
AMCDCoreWomen 
07/15 - 08/22
20/11/0
Online: Asynchronous
CRN 30499
4 Cr.
Size: 20
Enrolled: 11
Waitlisted: 0
07/15 - 08/22
M T W Th F Sa Su
             
+ asynchronous coursework

Subject: Music Classes (UG) (MUSC)

CRN: 30499

Online: Asynchronous | Online: Asynchronous

Online

Core Requirements Met:
      Fine Arts

Other Requirements Met:
     Amer Culture & Diff Minor Appr
     FYE Changemaking
     FYE Soci Just&Cultural Transf
     Writing Intensive
     WGSS Major Approved

Old Core (Pre-2020) Requirements Met:
     UG Core Fine Arts
     UG Core Human Diversity

(2021 Core Planning Guide)

  Christopher Kachian

The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester.

4 Credits


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